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    Hi there.

    I have an informal interview with a web design company next week and I just wondered if there are any tips or pointers for things to prepare for? How different is an informal interview than a formal one? I understand the dress code is smart / casual so I have trousers, smart shoes and a nice shirt.

    Is there any advice anyone could give me, no matter how basic. Things to bring, shirt tucked in / out, bring CV etc.

    Any help would be great.

    PS. I am applying to be a junior web developer at the company so I have no employment experience in that field.

    Thanks.
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    (Original post by deadmau5fan)
    Hi there.

    I have an informal interview with a web design company next week and I just wondered if there are any tips or pointers for things to prepare for? How different is an informal interview than a formal one? I understand the dress code is smart / casual so I have trousers, smart shoes and a nice shirt.

    Is there any advice anyone could give me, no matter how basic. Things to bring, shirt tucked in / out, bring CV etc.

    Any help would be great.

    PS. I am applying to be a junior web developer at the company so I have no employment experience in that field.

    Thanks.
    I work for a web development agency and I frequently interview people for our place.

    Wear something styleish, don't go in standard black trousers, shirt and blazer.

    Maybe a nice pair of trousers (grey), a shirt and a pull over?

    Or just go with grey trousers and a shirt. Just look well presented but not to stuffy, after all they are a creative company. And shirt absolutely must be tucked in. If you turned up for an interview without your shirt tucked in I would immediately have a negative impression about you.


    • Take your CV, and any examples of work you have done. Take your Ipad you have one to present if you wish.
    • Research the company. Shows you really want to work there.


    Good luck!
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    I suppose it depends on the company. I had an informal interview, well it was a 'chat' and walked away with the position. I went in my regular clothes which I was a little worried about, as I didn't want to seem too scruffy or that I was unable to make the effort.

    Anyway, I did some research on the company, found the guy I was meeting on LinkedIn, looked around to see what they said. Found Twitter images of the offices and what they were wearing, in this case it was very casual with pizza lying about. This was also a games company founded by under 30's, although my position was a junior web developer.

    I'd say if it is a bit pretentious and flashy, you're going to want to dress smartly just not in your Dad's suit.
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    Informal or formal, it doesnt matter, general chit chat or assessment centre, it's an opportunity for two to meet and identify relevance.

    First Impressions count - make a negative one and it takes a lot longer to salvage, if at all. So visual impressions count, dress is important but not at important as a smile, confident handshake and "Hello, nice to meet you, thanks for seeing me" with eye contact. Don't be nervous, the interviewer wants to meet you and wants you to be good.

    Understand why you are there and why you want to be there. Know about the company, who they are, what they do, who they do it for, etc. Have questions ready about the company, the role, the technology, their future. Show interest. Companies simply want people who want to work for them and can offer them the ability.

    Listen to their questions - breath and think about the questions - answer with relevance - give detail and examples - don't waffle or lose track of the point behind the question. Sell yourself - you may not have experience but they will know that. Tell them what you have done at home, school, Uni / College etc that shows an interest in Web design or other related tech. Demonstrate that you can learn through a natural interest in what they do.

    Finish the meeting with a display of interest, thank them for their time and your desire to work with them. Ask how long they intend to make a decision and inform them of anything else you have in the pipeline. If you're not interested, don't be afraid to say so, politely and honestly. It's better to end the interview process on high ground than wait for a rejection letter/call.

    Good Luck.
 
 
 
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