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UKIP ''allience'' with Conservatives? Watch

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    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/poli...at-Labour.html

    What are your thoughts on this?

    To me, it seems rather hypocritical. I've seen a good handful of UKIP supporters to bash the Conservative Party enough to suggest they don't want some form of allience/coalition. Then again, i'm sure many supports, on both sides, may like policies from parties.

    What do you think?
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    There will be no UKIP-Tory alliance while Cameron is leader. Farage has made this very clear and he is completely right to hold this stance, as Cameron simply cannot be trusted.
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    I don't think there will ever be one, even when Cameron has gone.
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    That's a bit hypocritical of both sides, considering what they've said about eachother.
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    No idea how likely it is, but it's probably the only way either of them will be in Downing Street after 2015, and that has a lot to do with the Coalition and very little to do with Labour.
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    There'll never be an allience between them. There may some day be an alliance between the two when Cameron's political career ends.
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    UKIP are never realistically going to get a majority, or even a plurality, in parliament. The best hope they have of making any difference, assuming they get any seats at all at the next general election, is to go into a coalition with the Conservatives who might by then have abandoned Cameron and the centre-right.
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    It would be in UKIP's advantage but Farage wouldn't do it with Cameron. The only Tory calling for it is that MEP. It's not going to happen and I hope it doesn't.
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    (Original post by Super Cicero)
    There will be no UKIP-Tory alliance while Cameron is leader. Farage has made this very clear and he is completely right to hold this stance, as Cameron simply cannot be trusted.
    I'm not sure the Conservative party can be trusted even without Cameron. So no, I can't see myself supporting an alliance.
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    So, what chances is there that Cameron may step down? Would we only be likely to see an ''allience'' after the 2015 election? (Presuming Cameron stays for the upcoming one)
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    (Original post by Tamora)
    I'm not sure the Conservative party can be trusted even without Cameron. So no, I can't see myself supporting an alliance.
    I currently support UKIP, but I think in the long-term, the best hope for Britain would be if the Tories and UKIP merged into a New Conservative Party (similar to what happened with the Tories and Reform party in Canada) and the new party was a proper conservative party and had most of UKIP's current policies.
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    (Original post by Super Cicero)
    I currently support UKIP, but I think in the long-term, the best hope for Britain would be if the Tories and UKIP merged into a New Conservative Party (similar to what happened with the Tories and Reform party in Canada) and the new party was a proper conservative party and had most of UKIP's current policies.
    I agree, but I can't see it happening.
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    Giving the recent actions of many ministers including Michael Gove, Theresa May and Phillip Hammond I think a tory leadership election in 2014 is inevitable.
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    It's ironic to think that if the conservative had let the Lib Dems propose Proportional Representation instead of AV, and pushed it hard, they would have no real problems securing a majority next term. Conservatives and UKIP combined dominate the popular vote. But Labour will have a majority next term purely because under FPTP Labour only need about 35% of the vote to get a majority.
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    I'd find it hard to believe that their would be an Alliance. I get the idea of coalitions in government, but there's too much commonality between UKIP beliefs of it's supporters and Tory grass roots. UKIP has come up from nothing, so they'd be crazy to dilute their success with aparty that they're in competition with.
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    (Original post by The Mad Dog)
    Giving the recent actions of many ministers including Michael Gove, Theresa May and Phillip Hammond I think a tory leadership election in 2014 is inevitable.
    I'm prepared to say you will be proved wrong.
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    (Original post by meenu89)
    I'm prepared to say you will be proved wrong.
    We'll find out.
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    (Original post by MatureStudent36)
    I'd find it hard to believe that their would be an Alliance. I get the idea of coalitions in government, but there's too much commonality between UKIP beliefs of it's supporters and Tory grass roots. UKIP has come up from nothing, so they'd be crazy to dilute their success with a party that they're in competition with.
    I agree with the bold bit - the phrase 'swivel-eyed loons' could be applied to both.
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    I think there is a good chance it could happen. Noone ever sets out to be in a coalition but if it made the difference between a right-wing government and a left-wing government I think both parties would go for it.
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    (Original post by Observatory)
    It's ironic to think that if the conservative had let the Lib Dems propose Proportional Representation instead of AV, and pushed it hard, they would have no real problems securing a majority next term. Conservatives and UKIP combined dominate the popular vote. But Labour will have a majority next term purely because under FPTP Labour only need about 35% of the vote to get a majority.
    This is simply not true.

    At the last election 36.1% voted Conservative, 29% Labour and 23% Lib Dem and 3.1% UKIP. Even in the 1983 election, the best Conservative performance in recent memory with a huge Thatcher majority, it was 42.4% Conservative, 27.6% Labour and 25.4% Liberal.

    The UK consistently votes as a centre-left country. Throughout the last century this was not reflected in the outcome of general elections because, since the inter-war years, there have been two parties splitting the centre-left vote and one party taking the centre-right vote. I think it is about time someone came along and split the centre-right vote too.
 
 
 
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