Worried i may not become a doctor! Watch

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Unregistered
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#1
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#1
Hi i'm sittinfg my GCSEs at this moment and these are my predicted grades,

English C
Maths B
Science A
A
French C
Geography A
Graphics A
P.E B
I.T A

I do not think these grades are good enough to become a doctor. Can anyone help?
mrmarsupial
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#2
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you could fail them all and still become a doctor, as long as u got onto all the courses you needed for after ur gcses
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Memento
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#3
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Originally posted by mrmarsupial
you could fail them all and still become a doctor, as long as u got onto all the courses you needed for after ur gcses
Yeah what marsupial said, your grades are looking good, and noone cares about GCSEs, really, except your college application. Don't listen to the GCSE teachers that tell you you need grade B GCSE English etc. to do such a thing, it's all lies, lol.
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Leekey
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#4
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Don't worry about things that you have no control over. If you are meant to become a doctor it will happen for you. I'm not saying don't try and become what you want to be. Just chill out and enjoy the ride a bit more. Alternatively work yourself silly until you cant spell the words "General Certificate Of Secondary Education".

Good Luck Whichever One You Choose
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Sorry bucky, but i am a medical student and GCSEs are very important to your application. they give an indication to overall ability as a student, and how you cope juggling lots of subjects and concepts all at one time, and at a stressful time.
It is a mistake to believe that all you need is to do the right A levels - you also need to do them well and have a very solid base of GCSEs on which to carry on your further education.
Applying to do medicine is also about lots of revelant work experience, commiment, inspiration and determination. Sadly, it is not as simple as "if its want you wnat to do, it will work out for you." You need to work at very hard. Some sobering thoughts - it costs £18000 to educatie a single medical student, and for every medical student in the country there are 11 unsuccessful applicants. Why should they pick you over straight A* students?
By all means, keep working very hard but keep your expectations real...
mrmarsupial
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I disagree, if you did mediocre on GCSE's but then came out with utter brilliant a levels, that shows u have got your head down, got some dedication and you can really work hard and be dedicated. the bad GCSE's work for your advantage ebcuase they show how much you have matured and improved.

Besides ur GCSE' predictions arnt even bad so I dunno what u on about. In fact they are excellent and much less results would still yeild high possibilty for ppl who wanted to go into medicine, lots of getting there is about commitment, not just some results on a sheet
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Leekey
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#7
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That was the most condecending piece of **** i have ever heard !!!!!

Please remove your head from your anus and look around.

The boy aint even got his GCSE results in yet so please refrain from crushing his hopes for the future you pathetic, ignorant moron.
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#8
GCSEs count for ****, they're merely a stepping stone to help you think and choose what you want to take at A-level. As long as you have above a C in Mathematics and English, (this is quoted from cam) you'll be fine.
Leekey
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#9
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#9
I would just like to suggest to the Med. student with the serious "god complex" that he may want to look into acheiving qualifications in the following:

-Humility
-Not sounding like a condecending moron
-Dealing with people (particularly important for a doctor)
-Not annoying / offending / irritating those those around you
Computergeek
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#10
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i found gcses ok, but i think that they are important. For one thing if u didnt do AS levels and above then gcses would be the only qualifications u had,
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Computergeek
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#11
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Originally posted by Unregistered
Hi i'm sittinfg my GCSEs at this moment and these are my predicted grades,

English C
Maths B
Science A
A
French C
Geography A
Graphics A
P.E B
I.T A

I do not think these grades are good enough to become a doctor. Can anyone help?
i think that u know that they are brilliant predictions, so stop showing off u snob!!!!
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mrmarsupial
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Also when I was being really evil to my spanish teacher and getting myself sent out of class, and purposely refusing to do work (on the oral exam I just said "i dont know" even when she asked my name in spanish and I actually knew that would but still said "i dont know") Also I admitted to them i cheated on my coursework and they ignored me lol. Anyway she said u need a lanuage gcse higher than a c to get into uni.

So being the clever little ******* I was I emailed Oxford and asked them, they told me its entirely based on A Levels (as they ask for A's anyway) And all you need is a grade C in the primary areas (which to do a levels u have to have anyway)
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Memento
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#13
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Getting a very high competition place on a course like medicine isn't going to be easy. That is true. There are many unsuccessful high quality applicants, this is true. You could do everything right, and not get the place you wanted, this is also true.

However, both the fact you need to ace your GCSEs in order to get a place, and the fact 11 out of 12 applicants don't get places, is poppycock. You show us the statistics for that, cause it isn't true by any stretch of the imagination.

There was a student that went to college with my sister, and he applied to be a medical student, and his GCSEs were all Cs, and his A levels 3Cs and a D. He got a place in Imperial College (a very good university). They don't just want 15,000 students who all got As, that's too common, they want people who stand out, people who are motivated, assertive, special. Out of college activities/Duke of Edinburgh can get you into the best universities around with very low grades. It's true there is strong competition for courses, it's you vs everyone else. But no way was that post true, and no way are 11 applicants rejected - to every successful candidate.
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Unregistered
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#14
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GCSE's are very important for a sustainable application for medicine. Do not listen to some of the bad advice offered.
The guy who answered "whatever will be will be" (to that effect.....) offers the best response.
Your predicted grades are reasonable anyway, work hard, ask for help when needed, and try to push a couple up a little

good luck
Goku_ssj4
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#15
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#15
lol at this thread. How one ignorant Med student F's it all up! I too wanna do medicine:

GCSE's

History- A
Maths- A
Science- A*A*
R.E- A*
Business .Studies- B
I.T- B
English- C
Geography- C


And unlike some on this thread including Mr. Med student I have done a lot of reserach into my future desired career. GCSE's ARE IMPORTANT ! BUT NO WAY IN THE CONTEXT that Med student is saying. Leeky and marsupial are partially correct.

Basically anything over 5 A's is definatly acceptable for Medicine! Infact you dont need to worry about GCSE's after that. AS-Levels i have no experience on so I cant comment on them.

And if u dont get 5 A's still a good chance of getting in, infact a very good chance; as long as A-Levels are OK of course.

My very close cousin got a only 3 A's and rest B's and C's. He then put his head down and went on 4th gear and pulled of ABB. He got accepted at Southhampton University!

So dont stress out, keep the dream alive.

[email protected] Leaky, he totally had that coming to him. Cant believe he would crush that poor guys dreams already including some of mines. But as you guys showed he was wrong
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Unregistered
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#16
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GCSE grades are important. They may say its only for college applications, but its the first thing that admission tutors will have to look at. They want students with consistancy in their work. In other words, they don't think highly of people who got poor GCSE results and good A level results. However grades only play a limited part of getting into medical school.

Don't believe your predicted grades, understand that these predicted grades are the lowest you can get. But most of the time, people get better than their predicted grades. For example, I was predicted to get 3 As, 6Bs and 3 Cs. Guess what I got in the end... 8A*s and 4As (not trying to boast, just trying to boost your confidence).

Applying for a medical school is very different to applying to a physics school for example. Because the people who want to do physics at good universities works very hard and reads a lot to gain their knowledge and the interviewers usually look for amount of knowledge, ability...etc. However for medical students, they assess you in 3 parts. Communication, Motivation and Well-roundness. Communication involves understanding the ethics and problems in medicine such as Euthanasia, Blood transfusions, HIV, current NHS problems, Private medicine. Even SARS will be a hot topic for interviewers this year. Motivation is where your grades and consistancy comes in, why you want to be a doctor, what are you particularly interested in medicine, and why you are interested in that part. Well-roundness, this is where they look at you overall including your extra-curricular activities, clubs, positions of responsibility e.g. working at care homes. Work experience, sports, music, arts, drama...etc. Each of those three parts are given a score out of 5.

So basically, having poor PREDICTED grades isn't the end of the world. If you are really serious about doing medicine as a potential career, then work hard during your A levels, push yourself to the extreme. In the end, your hard work will pay off.

Out of interest, why do you want to be a doctor?
Leekey
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#17
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#17
Just a thought people, but the idea is to NOT stress out the soon to be taking GCSE's person. I suggested that he should relax and not worry in order that he would not be taking his GCSE's under the impression that one incorrect answer could screw up his dream (this is not true). You people want to think about what you are posting and who you are talking to before you mount your high horses and claim that you know what is the best route to a choosen goal. That very idea is laughable as I am personally connected to medical graduates with less than perfect test results at both GCSE and A-level. However I am aware that grade can play an important part in this profession.

We should all lighten up and wish they guy good luck in his exams rather than suggesting that less then perfect grades would royally screw him as this is utter twadle.
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#18
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Well actually, isn't it better to think that one mistake could screw up your dream? Some people work harder when they think that
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#19
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#19
One thing that might at least give you a peace of mind. If you cannot become a doctor in this country... you could always go to another country. I hear that there is a medical school in prague which would be happy to take students that are able to speak good English. Also it is a lot easier to get in medical schools in other countries than it is here. You get more money in America too. :P
Computergeek
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#20
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u can get into southapton uni with about 3 Cs, my sis is a lecturer there
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