PhD funding for EU (non UK) grad students Watch

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ohlookdonuts
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Hi guys,
So I plan on coming to the UK this September to do a masters degree in Computer Science (self-funded). One of the biggest reasons for choosing the UK was this particular programme offers great teaching on a subject of high interest to me (Machine Learning) and that the instructors are well-known in the field, and so, upon completion of my masters degree I wish on staying at the university to do a PhD starting next year
However, I seem to have read today that , contrary to the US, PhD funding in the UK is not necesarilly guaranteed, and it seems that for non-UK people it is actually nonnexistent. Which is kind of disturbing, as I do not know how can it be expected of one to successfully complete and perhaps even obtain groundbreaking results during a PhD , and at the same time pay their own fees/living costs etc. This sort of puts me in a pickle, as I really expected to be similar to the US (stipends/teaching duties/some other form of funding available for a wide range/all people enrolled in a PhD). So, is it true that non-UK people have no funding (not taking here into consideration ridiculously competitive/ or conditioned on minority status/stellar previous research) during their PhD's?. Thanks.
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jdh7
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Depending on where you go, the lab may have funding. I'm an EU citizen (but don't meet the residency requirements for cheap tuition as I spent the last 2 years in the US doing a Master's), and my PhD funding is coming from the research group I'm joining (also machine learning, but robotics focussed). They're quite well funded compared to most groups I looked at though.

I believe you can also get EPSRC studentships as an EU/international student, so that's a possibility. They may only provide tuition though, rather than living costs. There usually are departmental studentships, and if you're a Master's student there I'd say you'd have a good shot if your adviser backed you.
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Nichrome
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(Original post by ohlookdonuts)
Hi guys,
So I plan on coming to the UK this September to do a masters degree in Computer Science (self-funded). One of the biggest reasons for choosing the UK was this particular programme offers great teaching on a subject of high interest to me (Machine Learning) and that the instructors are well-known in the field, and so, upon completion of my masters degree I wish on staying at the university to do a PhD starting next year
However, I seem to have read today that , contrary to the US, PhD funding in the UK is not necesarilly guaranteed, and it seems that for non-UK people it is actually nonnexistent. Which is kind of disturbing, as I do not know how can it be expected of one to successfully complete and perhaps even obtain groundbreaking results during a PhD , and at the same time pay their own fees/living costs etc. This sort of puts me in a pickle, as I really expected to be similar to the US (stipends/teaching duties/some other form of funding available for a wide range/all people enrolled in a PhD). So, is it true that non-UK people have no funding (not taking here into consideration ridiculously competitive/ or conditioned on minority status/stellar previous research) during their PhD's?. Thanks.
In general, no. International students are generally funded in two ways; either by their home government or by extremely competitive central university studentships. Though if you're very lucky your department might have some funding that has no nationality conditions attached to it, but this is very rare.
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Klix88
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(Original post by ohlookdonuts)
stipends/teaching duties
Just to add to the above, graduate teaching experience is very much less emphasised in the UK by comparison to the US. I can only comment on my field in the Humantiies, but there are no equivalents of Teaching Assistants which would bring in a steady wage. We get odd bits of teaching - maybe one or two lectures in a semester in our second and third years of research - but little more than that. I think the opportinuties for earning in the Sciences are slightly greater as some of my office colleague pick up casual work as lab assistants, setting up equipment for lecturers. but again, this is irregular work. Other types of casual work offered to us are coursework marking, helping with fieldwork, short courses and taking seminar sessions. But again, this isn't a reliable source of income and more graduates apply for the work, than there is work to go around.

I certainly wouldn't rely on it as anything other than a top-up as it can be stopped or withdrawn at short notice. My current uni has just cancelled all spending until the end of the financial year, which means that no grad work will be offered or paid between now and the start of August. This is going to impact those of us already booked to help with fieldwork and public-facing short courses.
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Ellim
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(Original post by Nichrome)
In general, no. International students are generally funded in two ways; either by their home government or by extremely competitive central university studentships. Though if you're very lucky your department might have some funding that has no nationality conditions attached to it, but this is very rare.
This.

And, sorry to burst your bubble but doing a PhD is not just about doing 'groundbreaking research' and if you can't handle your studies and funding (either through winning it or earning it) and conferences, and papers and all the other bits and pieces that go along with it, then you are probably not cut out for the process. There are five people behind you who will successfully do all of that and not complain about it, plus support their department administratively and perhaps teach too. (cue negative rep...)
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Moondancer26
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I'm an EU student and have been given full funding by my relevant research council. However, in order to be eligible for that you need to have lived in the UK for the last 3 years prior to starting the PhD. So if you can't get funding straight away from another source, you can always try to find a job here and then apply in a few years time?

The other alternative is to apply to the research council for a fees-only award. The research council will pay your tuition, and then you may be able to look for some additional grant from your home country or another organisation that can help you cover your living costs.
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Rupinder dhamoon
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I had a question regarding PhD funding scenario in Scotland. I will be starting in January 2019 at a Scottish University for PhD in Pharmacy. Since, the project is of extreme interest to me, I agreed to be a self- funded student. As part of self funded PhD, I was asked to provide funds for a year only which I provided. But due to sudden financial issues, I feel like I will be unable to provide funds for second year. Is it possible to receive funding for PhD as an international student for second year? Any kind of funding will be helpful.
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