Duffinator
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Don't know what to think about this exam. I'm confused about what they actually want from the exam.

Any help?
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lornarose
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They want you to compare the two texts in their places in history, and use relevant wider reading links, and explain their context.
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Rasceta
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I would be interested to learn how other people are revising for this exam. I took a look through all my wider reading and selected a few extracts for each category (poetry, prose, drama) out of the ones that have been most useful this year, which I am now reading carefully and annotating. Last year I made a quotes grid, but I did badly last year so I wanted to try a different approach.

Any advice on how to revise for this exam would be appreciated.

(Original post by Duffinator)
Don't know what to think about this exam. I'm confused about what they actually want from the exam.

Any help?
They mark you on four assessment objectives:
AO1 - this is fluidity of writing. They mark you on how well-structured and well-written your answer is, as well as your terminology. So if you say "cyclical structure" or "assonance" or another literary term, you pick up AO1 marks. You also get AO1 marks for giving your personal response, e.g. "In my opinion..."
AO2 - this is how well you analyse form, structure and language. It's not enough to point out language devices - you need to explain their purpose in the text and use them to make your argument.
AO3 - this is alternative interpretations and also comparisons between texts. You can set up comparisons and alternative interpretations in your answer by using key phrases such as "which can be contrasted with", "is extended within" and "which is further developed".
AO4 - this is context. You need to demonstrate a good understanding of the historical contexts of the works and how context affects the work. My teacher advises that you be tentative, but specific, in context. So, for example, instead of saying, "Elizabeth's hesitation to interrupt Mr Collins' proposal may be a reflection of the way women in nineteenth century England were expected to be quiet and submissive", you should argue more along the lines of, "Elizabeth's hesitation to interrupt Mr Collins' proposal may have been motivated by the concern that if she remained unmarried, then as she had no brothers, her family estate would be inherited by a distant male relative due to the English legal system at the time Austen wrote, and may also reflect pressures that unmarried women such as Austen herself faced to marry."
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kaz95
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thank you! that is a really useful tip!

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JackJack
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Right, my school literally bombed this exam last year, mainly due to the unexpectedness of two drama extracts, but we've been given some advice based on studied evidence of what has got near to full marks in the past. I'm sitting this on Thursday and really nervous.

First thing to do is not to memorise and know the AOs like the back of your hand. By this, I mean examiners do not want a robotic response to an answer, whereby you're literally trying to hit the AOs, they want them really well streamed into your response. Obviously know and understand them, but don't try and force things if you get me.

Have an understanding of each period and know some things about them, try and wieve this in well.

People have got full marks in the past writing just 2 and a half sides, it's quality not quantity.

Don't stress over loads of wider reading. They're not interested in you forming a dozen links and regurgitating ninety quotes. They want to see how well the wider reading fits with the extracts. Better to have the bare minimum than have one that's great and another that's shoddy.

With drama, comment on the AUDIENCE, to show you know the difference between dramas and other texts, and make sure you get in stage directions somewhere as well, that's crucial.

@Rasceta wieves in the AO4 well.
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Stylisticienne
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Hello! Old thread I know, but I wanted to leave a link to some Open Educational Resources created for students who would like to explore some late medieval and early Tudor love poetry as part of their preparation for AQA's Love through the Ages Reading for Meaning exam. Each poem has a Modern English translation, some notes on different sorts of writing about love, and some questions to help you think about the content of the poem, as well as how to relate form, structure and language to meaning. I hope they are useful: I'm a university tutor interested in getting students interested in medieval poetry.

http://stylisticienne.com/?page_id=250
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