Arsenal121
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I want to do a mathematics degree in university, is it possible to do a maths degree and then become an actuary? Do i need to take a course or something?
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Magnesium
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#2
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It is possible to take a maths degree and then progress on to becoming an actuary. Gain work experience from other firms to do with maths/finance etc. To be able to officially become an actuary you must pass the examinations also

http://www.actuaries.org.uk/becoming...become-actuary
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Arsenal121
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What if i do acturial sciences? Do i still need to do a examination to become and actuary?
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qno2
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#4
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(Original post by Arsenal121)
What if i do acturial sciences? Do i still need to do a examination to become an actuary?
What Actuarial Science degree actually give you will vary a fair bit from one university to the next. To become an actuary, you need to pass a minimum of 15 exams (9 CT's, 3 CA's, 2 ST's and 1 SA.) The actuaries website will give all the information you should need on this. Some Maths degrees might give you an option in later years to take a module or 2 that can lead to individual exemptions from a CT exam. Most accredited Actuarial Science degrees will give exemptions from CT1 - CT8 (CT9 is based on a residencial course or something.) There are a few MSc's available which can lead to CA1, CA3 and a few ST subjects. To qualify as an actuary, you need to have a certain amount of work experience as a trainee actuary (I can't remember who long it is.) I'd suggest reading a bit more about it before making any real decisions. It's also worth noting that actuarial science uses more statistics than mathematics in the work that it does.
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Slumpy
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(Original post by qno2)
What Actuarial Science degree actually give you will vary a fair bit from one university to the next. To become an actuary, you need to pass a minimum of 15 exams (9 CT's, 3 CA's, 2 ST's and 1 SA.) The actuaries website will give all the information you should need on this. Some Maths degrees might give you an option in later years to take a module or 2 that can lead to individual exemptions from a CT exam. Most accredited Actuarial Science degrees will give exemptions from CT1 - CT8 (CT9 is based on a residencial course or something.) There are a few MSc's available which can lead to CA1, CA3 and a few ST subjects. To qualify as an actuary, you need to have a certain amount of work experience as a trainee actuary (I can't remember who long it is.) I'd suggest reading a bit more about it before making any real decisions. It's also worth noting that actuarial science uses more statistics than mathematics in the work that it does.
3 years work experience, plus some requirements on training+work based skills questions.
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qno2
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(Original post by Slumpy)
3 years work experience, plus some requirements on training+work based skills questions.
Ahh cool. Also just noticed the typo in my post
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Arsenal121
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(Original post by qno2)
What Actuarial Science degree actually give you will vary a fair bit from one university to the next. To become an actuary, you need to pass a minimum of 15 exams (9 CT's, 3 CA's, 2 ST's and 1 SA.) The actuaries website will give all the information you should need on this. Some Maths degrees might give you an option in later years to take a module or 2 that can lead to individual exemptions from a CT exam. Most accredited Actuarial Science degrees will give exemptions from CT1 - CT8 (CT9 is based on a residencial course or something.) There are a few MSc's available which can lead to CA1, CA3 and a few ST subjects. To qualify as an actuary, you need to have a certain amount of work experience as a trainee actuary (I can't remember who long it is.) I'd suggest reading a bit more about it before making any real decisions. It's also worth noting that actuarial science uses more statistics than mathematics in the work that it does.
Thanks for replying,
The 15 exams that needs to be completed to become an actuary, are you able to do some of them with a maths degree?
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qno2
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As I said, it's totally dependant on the university but it's very unlikely that a standard maths degree will entitle you to any more than 2 exemptions. I also like to point out that at Heriot Watt there is a degree entitled Mathematical, Statistical and Actuarial Science(normally abbreviated to MSAS) which allows you to combine aspects of their maths degree with modules in actuarial science. I think, depending on what options you take, that you can graduate from this with up to 7 of the CT exemptions.


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Slumpy
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(Original post by Arsenal121)
Thanks for replying,
The 15 exams that needs to be completed to become an actuary, are you able to do some of them with a maths degree?
As above. I believe MORSE at Warwick offers a few, and there are various masters courses too, but most maths degrees would be unlikely to get you off more then CT3, CT6 (and I guess potentially CT8...maybe CT4, but I think this is more unlikely).
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Arsenal121
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What about if I do acturial sciences degree, will i cover every exams? Or will i need to take extra exams after i graduate?
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Slumpy
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#11
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(Original post by Arsenal121)
What about if I do acturial sciences degree, will i cover every exams? Or will i need to take extra exams after i graduate?
qno2's post appears to answer this.
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#Unknown
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#12
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Would I have an advantage if I took a masters degree at Manchester university and will it exempt more exams.
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