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How valuable is a top college law degree in other fields of work? watch

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    Fellow students and graduates,

    I will be applying to the UK for 2014 entry this fall, almost certainly for an undergraduate Law degree.

    I have a range of 41-44 IB points predicted, which gives me a fair chance at the top level universities.

    I am thinking of applying to Oxford, LSE, and UCL, all of which are highly competitive and regarded for their law programs.

    I am very interested in working in Business Management later on in life, the likes of Operations manager, CEO, or law-related management positions.

    I have taken Business Management and Economics for my IB diploma, so I already have a solid background of the subjects.

    However, moving on, I cannot apply for a Business or Economics degree in any good college in the UK, as they all require Mathematics at Higher level, which I do not have. Therefore, since I am interested in the field of Law and since I would love to follow its studies, I chose to apply for it.

    That being said, my question is:

    How valuable would an undergraduate law degree from Oxford, LSE, or UCL be in later seeking jobs in fields such as business, finance, economics, and so on?

    I've heard that the rigorous nature and competitiveness of the course gives it a great reputation for employers in any field. However, I keep having doubts.

    Would I really be limited to the fields of working as a Lawyer, or could it truly help me find a career path in any field?

    If so, then what other undergraduate degree could I pursue in order to help me with my ultimate goal? Keeping in mind that higher mathematics is not in my hands.

    Thank you all for your time and kind responses,

    Best wishes


    SC96
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    just remind you that you may work for a very long duration, say 30 yrs/ 40yrs. a top college will reward you with an excellent network and a more competitive edge at the very beginning stage ONLY. I see trainees from top law schools failed to retain in city firms after completion of training contracts. on the other hand, i see many solicitors are being invited to join the partnership of big firms due to their enormous billing and extensive network, which has nothing to do with their law schools at all.

    So, if you focus on hunting jobs, a degree from a top institution is very impressive. but nothing more than that a few years later. i would say experience/ network are so much more important
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    (Original post by SC96)
    Fellow students and graduates,

    I will be applying to the UK for 2014 entry this fall, almost certainly for an undergraduate Law degree.

    I have a range of 41-44 IB points predicted, which gives me a fair chance at the top level universities.

    I am thinking of applying to Oxford, LSE, and UCL, all of which are highly competitive and regarded for their law programs.

    I am very interested in working in Business Management later on in life, the likes of Operations manager, CEO, or law-related management positions.

    I have taken Business Management and Economics for my IB diploma, so I already have a solid background of the subjects.

    However, moving on, I cannot apply for a Business or Economics degree in any good college in the UK, as they all require Mathematics at Higher level, which I do not have. Therefore, since I am interested in the field of Law and since I would love to follow its studies, I chose to apply for it.

    That being said, my question is:

    How valuable would an undergraduate law degree from Oxford, LSE, or UCL be in later seeking jobs in fields such as business, finance, economics, and so on?

    I've heard that the rigorous nature and competitiveness of the course gives it a great reputation for employers in any field. However, I keep having doubts.

    Would I really be limited to the fields of working as a Lawyer, or could it truly help me find a career path in any field?

    If so, then what other undergraduate degree could I pursue in order to help me with my ultimate goal? Keeping in mind that higher mathematics is not in my hands.

    Thank you all for your time and kind responses,

    Best wishes


    SC96
    Okay, a few things. You may be right that you need maths A'level for economics in the UK. But that is not generally the case for management degrees. You need it for Bristol, and LSE and perhaps one or two others, but most other great universities only require maths at GCSE level (which presumably you have).

    Next, I'd recommend you also apply for two other Russell Group universities (you have five choices on your UCAS form, after all) to maximise your chances of getting offers. All of the three universities you have mentioned will have many times more applicants than places, so you need to play the numbers game.

    Finally to answer your question, an undergraduate law degree from Oxford, LSE, UCL or any Russell Group uni will be valuable if you seek jobs later on in management fields. A large number of employers really value law degrees, (a) because they think that people who have them are clever;
    (b) because LLB is very competitive so they know they are getting top level people; and
    (c) because they like the way that graduates are taught to think when they study law.

    No, you would not be limited to legal fields (just as studying history doesn't limit you to a career as a historian). Many many employers just look for people with a degree in any academically rigorous subject and law is certainly that.

    Don't entirely give up on studying management if that is your real love ... take a closer look at universities' requirements for A'level maths. Only a minority require it.
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    (Original post by Crumpet1)
    Okay, a few things. You may be right that you need maths A'level for economics in the UK. But that is not generally the case for management degrees. You need it for Bristol, and LSE and perhaps one or two others, but most other great universities only require maths at GCSE level (which presumably you have).

    Next, I'd recommend you also apply for two other Russell Group universities (you have five choices on your UCAS form, after all) to maximise your chances of getting offers. All of the three universities you have mentioned will have many times more applicants than places, so you need to play the numbers game.

    Finally to answer your question, an undergraduate law degree from Oxford, LSE, UCL or any Russell Group uni will be valuable if you seek jobs later on in management fields. A large number of employers really value law degrees, (a) because they think that people who have them are clever;
    (b) because LLB is very competitive so they know they are getting top level people; and
    (c) because they like the way that graduates are taught to think when they study law.

    No, you would not be limited to legal fields (just as studying history doesn't limit you to a career as a historian). Many many employers just look for people with a degree in any academically rigorous subject and law is certainly that.

    Don't entirely give up on studying management if that is your real love ... take a closer look at universities' requirements for A'level maths. Only a minority require it.
    Thank you, I truly appreciate your answer. I agree with everything you've said, its very helpful for my long-term goals.

    You are right in that I have a passion for management, however I believe that I can complete that through job training and later an MBA. The foundation of a Law degree will be more useful than Management. I was simply worried about being stuck in this "law path" as is the stereotype. However, that is probably more concerned with USA law schools wherein massive debt and an older age group pressures students to work as lawyers.

    Also, when it comes to the IB diploma, which is what I am pursuing at this moment, the pre-requisite for both Economics and Management undergrad are almost always Higher level. So, unfortunately, it is not the same as having the GSCE requirement. But that is not an issue, I do not enjoy mathematics anyways.

    I would love to hear more opinions! Also, good luck to all in finals and exams (if you haven't yet taken them).
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    I agree with you re a law degree, I do think it's a versatile and useful degree and a very worthy alternative to economics / management.

    Just for completeness though, I did do a few spot checks on Management course entry requirements into top 10 management courses though. I don't precisely understand what they're saying (hopefully you'll know yourself) but none of them seem to be saying that higher level maths is required. Here's what they say (this is all from the UCAS site):

    Bath - IB 38, No subject below 5 points, including English and Maths. Subjects and grades may be specified in the offer.

    Cardiff - IB 35, 5 points in Standard Level Mathematics.

    Exeter - IB 34-36 required.

    Kings - IB 38, with 6, 6, 6 at higher level, and 6 in English and Maths at at least standard level.

    LSE - IB 37, 7 6 6 required. 7 in higher level mathematics or another quantitative subject required. Would your higher level economics count?

    Loughborough - IB 36, must include 4 in SL English and SL Maths (or 5 in SL Maths Studies) if GCSE Maths and English Language not offered at Grade B

    Warwick - IB 38, Natural science (Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry or Biology) at higher level and humanities or social science subject at higher level

    NB: Oxford and UCL don't do Management degrees. UCL does Information Management which is similar but has IT leanings. Cambridge does Management but only as a tag-on to a different subject, so you have to apply for a different degree then do a management studies tripos in your 3rd or 4th year.
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    (Original post by Crumpet1)
    I agree with you re a law degree, I do think it's a versatile and useful degree and a very worthy alternative to economics / management.

    Just for completeness though, I did do a few spot checks on Management course entry requirements into top 10 management courses though. I don't precisely understand what they're saying (hopefully you'll know yourself) but none of them seem to be saying that higher level maths is required. Here's what they say (this is all from the UCAS site):

    Bath - IB 38, No subject below 5 points, including English and Maths. Subjects and grades may be specified in the offer.

    Cardiff - IB 35, 5 points in Standard Level Mathematics.

    Exeter - IB 34-36 required.

    Kings - IB 38, with 6, 6, 6 at higher level, and 6 in English and Maths at at least standard level.

    LSE - IB 37, 7 6 6 required. 7 in higher level mathematics or another quantitative subject required. Would your higher level economics count?

    Loughborough - IB 36, must include 4 in SL English and SL Maths (or 5 in SL Maths Studies) if GCSE Maths and English Language not offered at Grade B

    Warwick - IB 38, Natural science (Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry or Biology) at higher level and humanities or social science subject at higher level

    NB: Oxford and UCL don't do Management degrees. UCL does Information Management which is similar but has IT leanings. Cambridge does Management but only as a tag-on to a different subject, so you have to apply for a different degree then do a management studies tripos in your 3rd or 4th year.
    Thanks for the research! Some of those do require Math Higher, but I'll definitely keep all this in mind during applications. I really appreciate it, its nice to see that alternatives are always there!

    I'd love to hear more people's opinions on the initial question too
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    When we are talking about non-law jobs a law degree is no different than English or Geography or something similar. There are not really any law-related management jobs - you would need to get there and gain the experience through work, not through your degree.

    Your degree subject is not really the deciding factor for careers here. You would not be able to use law specifically. You would need to apply to generic graduate schemes which accept people who did a variety of different subjects. So, pick the academic subject you are most interested in. If you have a genuine interest in law then go for it. But if you have little interest in law and are simply trying to use it as a stepping stone to a business job, then the degree would be a miserable 3 years.
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    Yes Law is regarded as a very intellectually stimulating degree. You are definately not limited if you do a degree in Law. I myself want to go into the financial sector and most unis require maths at A Level which i don't have so i'm in the same position as you in a way.
    Most people in the finance sector said literally anyone if any degree can become an accountant or work in finance they told me people with degrees in chemistry, history, ancient history etc have all been transfered in the fields.
    The unis you states would be very impressive to the employers and if u get a 2:1 or first that would be very impressive but what is most important as someone mentioned is WORK EXPERIENCE. Get experience in the field u want to work in employers love someone whos 'been there done that'
 
 
 
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