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    I have no idea what to revise for the exam next tuesday! The aqa design text book seems as though it is full of useless information that I am wasting my time making notes from. Any help would be appreciated, and I would also like to see any model answers anyone has to offer? CHEERSSSS
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    I have the same problem except my exam board is edexcel...
    I think i have revised every topic very well but when it come to past papers i keep getting the wrong answer i really need the right strategy to tackle questions
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    Same! And my teacher was useless so that hasn't helped either :'(
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    I Have the same problems here. My exam boards AQA so right now im just focusing on the second half of the textbook for revision. On the exam itself maybe if you (or anyone who stumbles on this thread) posts a specific question their having trouble on we can all pitch in and help each other out. Since right now being the only one of 2 Product design students in my school what would really be helpful for me is to have someone to bounce ideas/information off of =)
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    (Original post by MissNix)
    I Have the same problems here. My exam boards AQA so right now im just focusing on the second half of the textbook for revision. On the exam itself maybe if you (or anyone who stumbles on this thread) posts a specific question their having trouble on we can all pitch in and help each other out. Since right now being the only one of 2 Product design students in my school what would really be helpful for me is to have someone to bounce ideas/information off of =)
    Yeah that's a good idea! I think i might struggle doing this question:
    Modern manufacturing relies heavily upon Information Communication Technology (ICT)
    to improve production and satisfy consumer demand.
    With reference to a specific industry, explain in detail why computers are vital to
    - manufacturing
    - marketing and supply.

    I was thinking CAD/CAM and talking about how its a quick high quality method to batch produce products but i have no idea:confused:

    and i was wondering if you have any ideas what could come up on the exam?
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    and alsooo the pages 178 - 190 in the aqa textbook, is that even relevant? it all seems more science than product design
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    (Original post by susiesalmon)
    Yeah that's a good idea! I think i might struggle doing this question:
    Modern manufacturing relies heavily upon Information Communication Technology (ICT)
    to improve production and satisfy consumer demand.
    With reference to a specific industry, explain in detail why computers are vital to
    - manufacturing
    - marketing and supply.

    I was thinking CAD/CAM and talking about how its a quick high quality method to batch produce products but i have no idea:confused:

    and i was wondering if you have any ideas what could come up on the exam?

    Reading the question the points to focus on the most would be CAD/CAM in:

    • Manufacture (self explanatory)
    • Marketing and supply (clients wants/needs as well as product promotion/advertisement)
    • How CAD/CAM has improved production (compare older relevant manufacturing methods to ones using ICT)
    • How does using CAD/CAM aid in satisfying consumer demand. (I think that just relates to the speed and which things are being produced, and the quality.)

    Speed, high consistent quality are probably the main advantages of ICT in design, advancements in communication is also a good point (your designers are in the UK but your factory is in china? No problem you can just email the specs to them )
    But first and foremost you have to pick a specific industry/product to base your answer on. The specific industry you pick to demonstrate these points don’t particularly matter I don’t think. As long as you can compare the old methods used to manufacture these items to the new methods involving CAD/CAM. So you’d need to pick a product that can be batch produced before you get into batch production =)
    How I would set it out is to give a brief description of what CAM/CAD is, the industry you will be referencing, and if relevant batch production within that industry. Then think of your products manufacturing life and work from the beginning (initial research into supply and demand collecting orders etc, initial designs) to the middle (modelling, manufacture) to the end (testing, marketing/promotion)


    Within each of these sections you would need to compare and contrast the current process that uses ICT with a relevant process that does not use ICT.
    For example the decorative carvings in furniture can be produced using CAM/CAD. CAD can be used to produce the design of the carving onto the computer, this can them be imposed onto a model of the furniture using editing software. This can then be sent to the client (also via ICT ie email) Once the design is approved it can be modelled using 3D rendering software. This design is then sent to the appropriate machine (say a CNC router) and cut. The CNC router ensures consistent accurate carving at low labour costs, whereas before these would need to be carved by hand which is expensive, labour intensive and does not guarantee consistency or accuracy.


    This is or course a very brief example and wouldn’t get many marks =/ But you get the idea. With a question like this just remember to compare and contrast the processes using ICT against those that do not (and of course how ICT has improved it!) and also make references to the uses outside the manufacturing stage. How has ICT giving product designer a better insight into consumers wants? How is it used in communication (either to your client, or even other designers/engineers/marketers working in the industry?)
    I might try this question out later on so maybe I can gve a more detailed example then, but I hoped I helped XD I can’t give high detail as I’m still learning this stuff myself so I just say refer to the textbook for help

    As for what Might come up in the exam? you guess is as good as mine XD. There tends to be a product dissection question (in the insert theres a picture of Idk A bottle of water, describe why it was produced this way, type question) But besides that there doesn’t seem to be a consistent formulae to it.

    (Original post by susiesalmon)
    and alsooo the pages 178 - 190 in the aqa textbook, is that even relevant? it all seems more science than product design

    Oh definitely! If there’s a question on technological developments TVs, Music players, Phones and vehicles are always good products to pick as there is so much you can right about them in a historical, social, economical, environmental etc sense, you won’t need all of them I don’t think, but I’d pick 2 of the products to revise on. And you won’t need the vast amount of detail that’s present but putting a little mention of how for example advancements in battery technology have directly influenced the decreasing sizes of phones, (technology advances, you now have tiny rechargeable lithium batteries that reduce the space needed for mobile phones allowing them to be only a few inches thick) will give you some extra marks
    ANYWAY I hoped this little ramble helped some and I didn't just miss whole the point of what you were asking XD
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    I'm finding it hard to revise too and since its the first and last chance to do the paper i am nervous. Here's what i'm gonna do in the rest of half term;

    >Do all the past papers and go through them with the marking scheme when i go back to school on monday (because were still allowed to come in to school).

    > Go through the back half of my AQA book

    > Learn at least four iconic designers and their products

    > Lastly look at things i'm not tooconfident with, like obsolescence, how a design includes disability needs etc.

    > recap AS basics

    * I Also want to practise writing the exam in 2 hours on the weekend because I'm not used to writing fast, and i feel like this is one fast writing exams.

    I'm not sure if there's anything else i could do, given the short period of time given to the exam!!!! so anything else to help/suggest would be grateful

    Also i dont have my AQA book with me because we were rushed out of school on the last day and i left it there!!!!
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    (Original post by Josiep)
    Also i dont have my AQA book with me because we were rushed out of school on the last day and i left it there!!!!
    I have a PDF of the AQA textbook, if you're ok giving me your email I can send it to you?
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    (Original post by MissNix)
    Reading the question the points to focus on the most would be CAD/CAM in:

    • Manufacture (self explanatory)
    • Marketing and supply (clients wants/needs as well as product promotion/advertisement)
    • How CAD/CAM has improved production (compare older relevant manufacturing methods to ones using ICT)
    • How does using CAD/CAM aid in satisfying consumer demand. (I think that just relates to the speed and which things are being produced, and the quality.)

    Speed, high consistent quality are probably the main advantages of ICT in design, advancements in communication is also a good point (your designers are in the UK but your factory is in china? No problem you can just email the specs to them )
    But first and foremost you have to pick a specific industry/product to base your answer on. The specific industry you pick to demonstrate these points don’t particularly matter I don’t think. As long as you can compare the old methods used to manufacture these items to the new methods involving CAD/CAM. So you’d need to pick a product that can be batch produced before you get into batch production =)
    How I would set it out is to give a brief description of what CAM/CAD is, the industry you will be referencing, and if relevant batch production within that industry. Then think of your products manufacturing life and work from the beginning (initial research into supply and demand collecting orders etc, initial designs) to the middle (modelling, manufacture) to the end (testing, marketing/promotion)


    Within each of these sections you would need to compare and contrast the current process that uses ICT with a relevant process that does not use ICT.
    For example the decorative carvings in furniture can be produced using CAM/CAD. CAD can be used to produce the design of the carving onto the computer, this can them be imposed onto a model of the furniture using editing software. This can then be sent to the client (also via ICT ie email) Once the design is approved it can be modelled using 3D rendering software. This design is then sent to the appropriate machine (say a CNC router) and cut. The CNC router ensures consistent accurate carving at low labour costs, whereas before these would need to be carved by hand which is expensive, labour intensive and does not guarantee consistency or accuracy.


    This is or course a very brief example and wouldn’t get many marks =/ But you get the idea. With a question like this just remember to compare and contrast the processes using ICT against those that do not (and of course how ICT has improved it!) and also make references to the uses outside the manufacturing stage. How has ICT giving product designer a better insight into consumers wants? How is it used in communication (either to your client, or even other designers/engineers/marketers working in the industry?)
    I might try this question out later on so maybe I can gve a more detailed example then, but I hoped I helped XD I can’t give high detail as I’m still learning this stuff myself so I just say refer to the textbook for help

    As for what Might come up in the exam? you guess is as good as mine XD. There tends to be a product dissection question (in the insert theres a picture of Idk A bottle of water, describe why it was produced this way, type question) But besides that there doesn’t seem to be a consistent formulae to it.




    Oh definitely! If there’s a question on technological developments TVs, Music players, Phones and vehicles are always good products to pick as there is so much you can right about them in a historical, social, economical, environmental etc sense, you won’t need all of them I don’t think, but I’d pick 2 of the products to revise on. And you won’t need the vast amount of detail that’s present but putting a little mention of how for example advancements in battery technology have directly influenced the decreasing sizes of phones, (technology advances, you now have tiny rechargeable lithium batteries that reduce the space needed for mobile phones allowing them to be only a few inches thick) will give you some extra marks
    ANYWAY I hoped this little ramble helped some and I didn't just miss whole the point of what you were asking XD
    Ah that's so good thankyou! Even with the help of the textbook I wouldn't be able to suggest all of those points haha! I'm gunna have a go at the question without the textbook but just with your notes, i'll probably chose to reference the furniture industry but specify on one product which I hope should be ok. There's just so much to say for one question and i can never remember it all!

    another question i was unsure of was the June 2012 one about two food colanders and how they were manufactured. I've never been good on deciding what processes applies to what product!

    thanks again for your help!
    anything i could possibly help you on then just ask
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    (Original post by MissNix)
    Reading the question the points to focus on the most would be CAD/CAM in:

    • Manufacture (self explanatory)
    • Marketing and supply (clients wants/needs as well as product promotion/advertisement)
    • How CAD/CAM has improved production (compare older relevant manufacturing methods to ones using ICT)
    • How does using CAD/CAM aid in satisfying consumer demand. (I think that just relates to the speed and which things are being produced, and the quality.)

    Speed, high consistent quality are probably the main advantages of ICT in design, advancements in communication is also a good point (your designers are in the UK but your factory is in china? No problem you can just email the specs to them )
    But first and foremost you have to pick a specific industry/product to base your answer on. The specific industry you pick to demonstrate these points don’t particularly matter I don’t think. As long as you can compare the old methods used to manufacture these items to the new methods involving CAD/CAM. So you’d need to pick a product that can be batch produced before you get into batch production =)
    How I would set it out is to give a brief description of what CAM/CAD is, the industry you will be referencing, and if relevant batch production within that industry. Then think of your products manufacturing life and work from the beginning (initial research into supply and demand collecting orders etc, initial designs) to the middle (modelling, manufacture) to the end (testing, marketing/promotion)


    Within each of these sections you would need to compare and contrast the current process that uses ICT with a relevant process that does not use ICT.
    For example the decorative carvings in furniture can be produced using CAM/CAD. CAD can be used to produce the design of the carving onto the computer, this can them be imposed onto a model of the furniture using editing software. This can then be sent to the client (also via ICT ie email) Once the design is approved it can be modelled using 3D rendering software. This design is then sent to the appropriate machine (say a CNC router) and cut. The CNC router ensures consistent accurate carving at low labour costs, whereas before these would need to be carved by hand which is expensive, labour intensive and does not guarantee consistency or accuracy.


    This is or course a very brief example and wouldn’t get many marks =/ But you get the idea. With a question like this just remember to compare and contrast the processes using ICT against those that do not (and of course how ICT has improved it!) and also make references to the uses outside the manufacturing stage. How has ICT giving product designer a better insight into consumers wants? How is it used in communication (either to your client, or even other designers/engineers/marketers working in the industry?)
    I might try this question out later on so maybe I can gve a more detailed example then, but I hoped I helped XD I can’t give high detail as I’m still learning this stuff myself so I just say refer to the textbook for help

    As for what Might come up in the exam? you guess is as good as mine XD. There tends to be a product dissection question (in the insert theres a picture of Idk A bottle of water, describe why it was produced this way, type question) But besides that there doesn’t seem to be a consistent formulae to it.




    Oh definitely! If there’s a question on technological developments TVs, Music players, Phones and vehicles are always good products to pick as there is so much you can right about them in a historical, social, economical, environmental etc sense, you won’t need all of them I don’t think, but I’d pick 2 of the products to revise on. And you won’t need the vast amount of detail that’s present but putting a little mention of how for example advancements in battery technology have directly influenced the decreasing sizes of phones, (technology advances, you now have tiny rechargeable lithium batteries that reduce the space needed for mobile phones allowing them to be only a few inches thick) will give you some extra marks
    ANYWAY I hoped this little ramble helped some and I didn't just miss whole the point of what you were asking XD
    okay now i'm completely lost, how does the use of ict help marketing and supply? can this include batch production?
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    (Original post by susiesalmon)
    okay now i'm completely lost, how does the use of ict help marketing and supply? can this include batch production?
    Had to look at the marks for this one, apparently its related to pages 207-209 in the text book with QRM,JIT,EPOS etc. I have no idea what these things are so I can't help much with this.

    (Original post by susiesalmon)
    Ah that's so good thankyou! Even with the help of the textbook I wouldn't be able to suggest all of those points haha! I'm gunna have a go at the question without the textbook but just with your notes, i'll probably chose to reference the furniture industry but specify on one product which I hope should be ok. There's just so much to say for one question and i can never remember it all!

    another question i was unsure of was the June 2012 one about two food colanders and how they were manufactured. I've never been good on deciding what processes applies to what product!

    thanks again for your help!
    anything i could possibly help you on then just ask

    With the two colenders it seems that the metal one is made from stainless steel or aluminum (They both look exactly the same so I can't tell XD) and could have been press formed (page 41 in the text book) for the body, then the holes would have to be punched in (not sure of the exact manufacturing method on that) The base of the collander might have be welded to the body? I can't tell if it's one peice of not from the picture. The plastic colland would have been injection moulded. I need to revise manufacturing methods also but I'm pretty ok with plastc manufacturing methods so I'll give some tips on that.

    Mostplastic products are either blow moulded, injection moulded, vacuum formed, or rotaion moulded calandering might come up aswell. When it comes to indentifying which product matches the manufacturing method:

    Blow moulding: used to produce hollow object with hollow neck ie.Plastic bottles.

    Vaccum forming: used to produce hollow objects, but cannot produce a fully enclosed hollw object (ie it cn produce a hollow semi circle but not a hollw sphere) Two halves of a vaccum formed product mayy be joined together, if so there would be a noticeable seam.

    Injection moulding: generally used for s filled (not hollw) complex 3D shapes. If the product has a joint mechanism built in (the flat packed collander had some) Then its injection moulded. Also if you've ever noticed some plasitc objects like containers have a small circular indent on the bottom of them, I cant remember exactly what part of the machine causes that but its another sign of it.

    Rotaion moulding: Used to produce hollow, fully enclosed shapes (common ones being storage tanks and bins)

    Calendering: used for things like film and shopping bags.


    I'm going to need help with a June 2010 question:

    "Explain what you understand by the term iconic design In your answer you should refer to at least four criteria that could be used to define a product as being an iconic design."
    .
    (14 marks)

    I have no idea how to approach this one XD
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    (Original post by MissNix)
    I have a PDF of the AQA textbook, if you're ok giving me your email I can send it to you?
    Thank you for sending it to me, I feel a less stressed now....ah
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    Iconic design – iPod/Mini/Dyson

    Acronym S – symbolic P – provenance U – unique R – resonance

    Key words: Set Bench mark to follow, fashion Icon, Longevity (links to sustainability), Sets a trend, changed the way the consumer interacted with the product. Stands the test of time, originality, excellence and utility. Innovation, technological push, market pull.

    Symbolic – The design represented a movement in time (iPod could be the move from CD to MP3)

    Provenance – It has a rich history that affects the user. Mini had huge technological advancements that are still used today. iPod has the innovative scroll wheel.

    Unique – iPod has contemporary curves and a timeless design, it is seen as the genesis of MP3 players, and it has become a fashion icon. iTunes was the first way of buying music online legally.

    Resonance – The iPod is remembered it evokes passion and is still used today.

    "Explain what you understand by the term iconic design In your answer you should refer to at least four criteria that could be used to define a product as being an iconic design."

    Jonathan Ive was the designer behind the iconic iPod.

    The iPod has the four criteria that I believe make a design Iconic. It is symbolic, has provenance, it is unique and resonates with the consumer.

    (Symbolic) The iPod was the first multi media format device that allowed a large amount of storage in a relatively small device. Previous ways of storing music such as CD became obsolete. The design was the first of its kind and has since become a fashion icon that is desired.


    (Provenance) The iPod changed the way people interact with music, iTunes was created and music became easily downloadable online. Users were able to own a huge library of music digitally without the need to carry around CD’s, it changed the way the user listens to music.

    (Unique) The iPod created a technological push that made the iPod unique and created a market pull. One of these features is the navigation scroll wheel. This allowed the user to easily navigate and gave a contemporary look with minimal buttons.

    (Resonance) The white iPod set a bench mark for other designers to follow it has since been copied but it is seen as the original. The iPod is a timeless design; the old version does not look outdated in a modern environment. The iPod has stood the test of time. The form of the iPod is one of the reasons why it is so desirable, smooth contours and anodised aluminium.
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    This is how I would answer the ICT systems question:

    Flexible Manufacturing Systems in particular, robot arms can be used in the car production industry, the same machine can be used to spot weld and then it can be changed to do the spray painting of the car. This allows the manufacturer to meet demand efficiently by using the same machine for multiple uses.
    CNC machines are used to accurately cut out things such as the chassis; this would be done using a CNC laser and could be modified easily using software to make different designs. The demand from the consumer will mean that new designs will need to be different from old ones.
    Robotics- Spray painting a car could be done using a robotic arm that has good degree of freedom (movement), this has allowed cars to be produced with higher quality and consistency.
    Computer aided engineering will allow components for cars to be tested before manufacturing, this is particularly important because the car will need to be safe for the consumer.

    Electronic point of sale refers to the technology of using barcodes in products. The sale is registered with the distributor who in turn reorders stock from the manufacturer. This helps to make sure that the components are supplied to meet the demand. Epos enables JIT which is an essential part of QRM.
    JIT is a system devised to control the level of stock. Materials and components are arranged to arrive when they are needed. It stops the assembly line from becoming cluttered and avoids costly storage.
    Kanbans allows stock levels to be controlled and it monitors the flow of products and components through a system.
    Telematics is a system used to electronically track a product as it passes through the assembly line. For example customer’s specification for the order is processed using data that is programmed into a black box which is placed on the car, this ensures that get the correct modifications such as stereo/wheels/interior etc.
    Master production schedule controls the quantity of each product to be made in a given time schedule in the car industry this is done using order-based scheduling because cars have to be made to individual order. Material requirements planning are used to get the correct materials and options for each car.
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    (Original post by MissNix)
    Had to look at the marks for this one, apparently its related to pages 207-209 in the text book with QRM,JIT,EPOS etc. I have no idea what these things are so I can't help much with this.




    With the two colenders it seems that the metal one is made from stainless steel or aluminum (They both look exactly the same so I can't tell XD) and could have been press formed (page 41 in the text book) for the body, then the holes would have to be punched in (not sure of the exact manufacturing method on that) The base of the collander might have be welded to the body? I can't tell if it's one peice of not from the picture. The plastic colland would have been injection moulded. I need to revise manufacturing methods also but I'm pretty ok with plastc manufacturing methods so I'll give some tips on that.

    Mostplastic products are either blow moulded, injection moulded, vacuum formed, or rotaion moulded calandering might come up aswell. When it comes to indentifying which product matches the manufacturing method:

    Blow moulding: used to produce hollow object with hollow neck ie.Plastic bottles.

    Vaccum forming: used to produce hollow objects, but cannot produce a fully enclosed hollw object (ie it cn produce a hollow semi circle but not a hollw sphere) Two halves of a vaccum formed product mayy be joined together, if so there would be a noticeable seam.

    Injection moulding: generally used for s filled (not hollw) complex 3D shapes. If the product has a joint mechanism built in (the flat packed collander had some) Then its injection moulded. Also if you've ever noticed some plasitc objects like containers have a small circular indent on the bottom of them, I cant remember exactly what part of the machine causes that but its another sign of it.

    Rotaion moulding: Used to produce hollow, fully enclosed shapes (common ones being storage tanks and bins)

    Calendering: used for things like film and shopping bags.


    I'm going to need help with a June 2010 question:

    "Explain what you understand by the term iconic design In your answer you should refer to at least four criteria that could be used to define a product as being an iconic design."
    .
    (14 marks)

    I have no idea how to approach this one XD
    ah fab thankyou! really need to go over metal processes i'm terrible!

    and about iconic design, well i think that guy above has pretty much said it all really haha
    i mentioned how iconic designs are considered 'ground breaking' and how they set new heights for design standards in that particular product field. For example the iphone or ipod has pretty much made other manufacturers up their game to rival them, in turn setting a trend.
    it's a design that improves an existing product
    aesthetically pleasing and will stand 'the test of time'
    one that is recognised immediately by customers
    a product that is the result of technological advancements

    sorry cant think of much more!
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    Sustainability and the effects of manufacture, use and disposal of a product are important.

    For a named product of your choice, carry out a life cycle assessment.
    Give full consideration to the following issues in order to justify your answers:
    • the extraction and processing of raw materials,
    • the manufacture, distribution and the use and final disposal of the product.



    Life cycle assessment for a polymer kettle

    During the extraction of crude oil to make the polymer for the kettle a lot of energy is consumed, this is damaging to the environment because oil is not a renewable source and will soon run out. Using plastic is not very sustainable. Mining the metal ore for the cabling and components inside the kettle will produce toxic chemicals and gases to the surrounding environment possibly endangering wildlife. The effect could be reduced through effective design; this could be by reducing the amount of material used for the kettle. Making the product timeless will ensure that it has good longevity and will not need to be replaced after 6 months.
    Manufacturing the kettle would be done using injection moulding. Efficient mould designs will reduce the amount of waste. Ultra sonic welding to connect some of the interior components will be more sustainable that using toxic adhesives. Using smart metal actuators will help to remove components. This will be beneficial later during the end of use disposal. A lot of energy is consumed during the production of the kettle. Using materials that are easily melted and moulded at low temperature will save costs. Limiting the amount of steps in the manufacture will also reduce the environmental impact. Does the kettle need to have a chrome handle or is it purely for aesthetics? Finding the balance between form and function is important when designing a sustainable product.

    The distribution of the kettle could be made more sustainable by having efficient packing design. This would fit more to the pallet and reduce the amount of trucks or container ships needed to transport the kettle to the consumer. This will reduce the amount of fuel used and lead to a more sustainable product. Bio additives could be used in the LDPE film to help it degrade when it goes to the landfill.

    The use of the Kettle consumes a high amount of energy it can be easily designed to be more efficient to aid in reducing this consumption. For example a thermo chromic pigment could be used that changes colour when the kettle is at the correct temperature. This will prevent the kettle from being boiled if it is already hot. A water measuring system will ensure that only enough water for the drinks being made is boiled. This could be in the form of a reservoir or a simple ML measure. LED’s could be used to show when the kettle has finished boiling to prevent it boiling too long. It could also have a cut out switch that turns the heating element off at the right temperature. The kettle should have good insulation to retain heat this will be useful when multiple drinks are being made.

    Disposing of the product will be damaging to the environment, polymers take a long time to degrade. By using materials that can be recycled easily the product will become more sustainable. Making sure the components can be easily disassembled from the kettle is important. The waste electronic and electrical equipment directive states that products should be disposed of at designated WEEE points. This will help to reduce the effect of disposing the kettle.
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    Another product with quite alot to write of being an iconic design is Robin Day's polyprop chair (1964). My teacher gave us a essay plan for a question related to an iconic product, hope this helps

    Criteria:
    groundbreaking and sets new standards in its field
    innotive in terms of new technologies, materials or manufacturing techniques
    sets a benchmark for others to follow or copied/inspires other designers
    timeless, doesnt date and remains popular
    memorable and recogniseable
    difficult to better (ie. no one has improved on it)
    is an improvement on past designs

    Robin Day's polyprop chair utilized a new material and a fairly new production process in its design which had never been used in furniture design before. - Made of polypropelene which had only been developed as a material 9 years prior to the design of the chair. - Day realized using polyprop (thermoplastic with elastic properties) he would be able to injection mould a single ergonomically designed seat. This method was low cost, which meant the chair could be mass produced and sold cheaply to the consumer. He developed a rim around the seat which added strength and flex as well as comfort to the user. Both the material and process were new, groundbreaking technologies and had never been used in seating design until this point, which is one of the reasons it is an iconic design. (can draw diagram of chair showing properties)

    The design is timeless and widely used in the world today. Many companies have copied the design, but none have ever bettered it. It is one of few chairs still in production after over 40 years. It is made in 40 countires worldwide and over 40million have been sold. Tom Dixon, habitat designer, comments that it is the 'most widely recognjiseable chair in the world and it is unlikely that anyone in the UK exists who has never at one point sat on one.' The chair is uniquely functional but is also low cost to buy and produce. It is hardwearing and comfortable. Available in in mini versions used in nurserys or adult size in classrooms and hospitals (etc...) The chair stacks well and the hole in the back is an ingenious addition to conserve materials and to give a lifting point for carrying. (diagram perhaps showing stacking feature)

    The design improves vastly on what came before it. Prior to the polyprop chair other mass produced 'classroom chairs' were often made of beach or oak or similar to marcel breuer's tubular steel chair, both types were less comfortable and more expensive to produce and buy. They were also heavier and not possible to stack.

    The polyprop chair sets a benchmark for new chair desingn and the use of plastics in manufacture, furniture and seating. Single moulded thermoplastic garden seating is now common today but this is a direct development of Robin Day's idea of a single injection moulded seat. (diagram of plastic seat) Many of the chairs we use in everyday life rely on thermoplastics to provice the back aspects or the seat, including office chairs.

    The chair was chosen of 1 of 8 design classics and is an influential design and can be considered iconic in every sense.
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    (Original post by susiesalmon)
    I have no idea what to revise for the exam next tuesday! The aqa design text book seems as though it is full of useless information that I am wasting my time making notes from. Any help would be appreciated, and I would also like to see any model answers anyone has to offer? CHEERSSSS
    I took this exam last year and am now studying design - feel free to fire any questions my way - just quote me

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    Consumer safety is a vital consideration in product design.
    For one of the following, explain what issues must be considered to ensure safe use of
    the product.
    ! Electric drill
    ! Hair straighteners
    ! Kettle
    ! Desk lamp
    ! Iron

    CAN ANYONE HELP WITH THIS ONE?! THANKYOU
 
 
 
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