MissNix
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(Original post by susiesalmon)
haha yeah anything about a kettle or an iphone then i'm sorted!
Yeah =) Right now i just need to stay focused though, I haven't completely finished the textbook yet =/ *on page 180 atm*
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Nic Nac
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Hi everyone,

I've got the exam tomorrow too, good luck!!

Anyway, I did a past paper question (June 2012) and emailed it my teacher but haven't got any reply regarding marks. Would I be okay to post my answers on here to see what people think/for feedback? Struggling with this exam as we spent most of year on coursework and not on theory
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MissNix
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(Original post by Nic Nac)
Hi everyone,

I've got the exam tomorrow too, good luck!!

Anyway, I did a past paper question (June 2012) and emailed it my teacher but haven't got any reply regarding marks. Would I be okay to post my answers on here to see what people think/for feedback? Struggling with this exam as we spent most of year on coursework and not on theory
Go for it =) Not sure if I can be much help in terms of marking but I'll try.

and it seems to be a common thing for techers to neglect the theroy -__- I was only taught therory in the last week of school when it was supposed to be a year round thing.
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Supertod
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Could someone do me a quick summary of a kettle?
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Nic Nac
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Sorry for my delay in reply but here goes

QUESTION 1
Describe simple workshop tests which could be carried out to a range of materials inorder to investigate two of the mechanical properties from the list below.
  • Hardness
  • Tensile strength
  • Toughness
  • Ductility and malleability (2 x 6 marks)






[0|1] Hardness: The Rockwell, Brinell and Vickers tests are all tests that can be carried out to investigate the hardness of a material. The Rockwell test is mainly done on finished products to check its quality and the hardness value is shown on a dial. The Brinell test is when an indent is made into a test piece using a small circular hammer and the size of the indent is then measured. The Vickers test is when a diamond shape is forced into the test piece and then the size of the indent is then measured with help from a microscope.
Tensile Strength: To test for tensile strength the test piece is held between two grips or chucks, one grip/chuck is stationary whilst the other one can move on a vertical slide and is powered by a motor or gearbox. The test piece is then stretched either until it beaks or until the limits of the equipment is reached.

Sometimes it is necessary to combine two or more materials in order that the enhanced properties can be utilised.
For two of the following, name a specific composite material, stating its constituent parts. In each case explain why the composite material is suitable for a specific application.

  • Fibre-reinforced composite
  • Particle-based composite
  • Sheet-based composite


[0|2] Fibre-reinforced composite: Carbon fibre is a fibre reinforced composite and is used both in motor sports and cycling. Carbon fibre is lightweight so helps with the speed of a formula one car and bicycles as well as making bicycles easier to carry. As it is a thin material it can make a bicycle faster due to the reduced amount of material needed to make the bike.
Sheet based composite: MDF (Medium Density Fibreboard) is a sheet-based composite that is used for furniture. It is a cheap but relatively sturdy material making it affordable whilst also making a functional and durable product. It is often thin and lightweight making it useful for products were the user has to build the furniture themselves as if made out of MDF each part would be easy to carry and lift.


  1. The selection of materials and processes for the manufacture of products variesaccording to the quantity of the product required.
    For two of the following scales of production explain what materials and processescould have been used in the manufacture of a product you have named.

    • One-off production
    • Batch production of 100 units
    • Mass production of 10000 units (2 x 14 marks)




QUESTION 3
[0|4] ONE OFF PRODUCTION One off production is often for higher quality products so higher quality material such as hardwoods (e.g. mahogany) would be used to create furniture such as a dining room table. The product would be very expensive but of high quality with each one made having different grain patterns so individual to the user. The processes would most likely be done by one person or a small group and in a workshop using hand tools which would take time though the product would be expected to last a long time.
MASS PRODUCTION Mass Production is often used for an everyday product so a quick and effective process is used. A product that would be made as part of mass production is a toothbrush. A toothbrush is a complex 3D shape so would be made out of plastic (acrylic) and injection moulded. It would be made out of plastic as plastic is strong, resistant to water and can be coloured to be aesthetically pleasing. Injection moulding would become cost effective, it has high set up costs, for making a low cost item such as a toothbrush as multi cavity moulds would be used to produce multiple items per machine cycle. Nylon brushes would be used for the toothbrushes bristles as nylon is strong and can withstand force being applied. The nylon would be moulded around during the injection moulding process. During mass production to save money and time a CNC (computer numerical controlled) may be used for accurate repetitive production of the same item though regular quality control checks would have to take place.



QUESTION 5

Answer all parts of this question.
Figures 5–7 on the Insert Sheet show examples of street furniture.
Explain the main criteria that you believe should be used in the design of such items.

(8 marks)
Using the criteria you have given in part [07] critically evaluate the design of the benchshown in Figures 5–6 and the bin shown in Figure 7.



[0|7] One of the main criteria of street furniture should be that it fits within its environment of either rural or urban/inner city. The materials used should also reflect the environments too and as seen in figure 5 the metal and wood used for the bench suit the park environment whilst the more modern plastic suits the bin in figure 8 as it is in a city/urban environment. All street furniture products should be weather proof as they are outside with some materials being protected by varnish, paint etc. Protecting metal with paint stops it being heated up by the sun and stops it from rusting due to rain. Furniture can be made weatherproof by being fixed to the floor, as both the bench and bin are, to stop heavy winds being able to move them. Street Furniture should be made to reduce vandalism with the products being cemented down to stop them being moved, lids of bins being locked down to prevent their removable and anti graffiti paint being used. The products would have to be functional and easy to use by a wide variety of people as they are in a public environment so anthropometrics would have to used to get the 5th and 95th percentile to base the products on.


[0|8]
The bench’s main function is to hold people’s weight and although the maximum weight it can hold isn’t known, we can see the bench has metal supports or ‘legs’ holding at either side showing it can handle weight and is designed to support a large load. An additional support or ‘leg’ could be added in the centre of the bench to help the bench hold more weight and prevent it from braking/collapsing. The wooden planks that hold the bench together are thick so would be strong and durable and wouldn’t snap when weight was applied.
The bench has the additional functions to be comfortable and easy to use. The product’s shape makes it comfortable to sit on due to its curved shape that replicates the human body when sitting down. The wood is smooth so prevents people getting injured by splinters and similarly the bolts are flat on the side of the bench people sit on so people don’t get injured or hurt by them sticking into their leg. Also as the bolts can be sat on, it maximizes the width of the bench that can be used.
The handles and backrest of the bench make it easier to use and more ergonomic as the backrest offers support and both the backrest and handles prevent people, especially young children, falling off the bench. The handles may also help the disabled, elderly or children get on or off the bench easily as they can push or pull themselves up using them.
The bin’s function is to hold rubbish, which it does with a large gap allowing people to put rubbish into the bin. The lid helps the product hold rubbish as the lid prevents the wind blowing the rubbish out of the bin, this also shows the bin is weather resistant. The bin also has to be easy to empty, which it is due to the lid being removable so the bin bag can be fully accessed. The bin lid being removable makes it prone to being taken or stolen leading the perhaps costly and continuous replacements needed so a lock and key system for removing the lid may be better. As the lid is plastic it will be lightweight so will be easy to lift off when removing the bin bag.
The bin is weather resistant as it is plastic so cannot rot or rust and rain will easily run down the sides. As the product has a lid wind is prevented from blowing rubbish out and rain cannot fill/flood the bin, which would make is unusable as there is no visible signs of how water could drain out of the bin.
The bench, which is made out of materials to fit in with its rural, park environment, is painted on the metal handles and metal legs so the paint protects the metal from rust. Yet if the paint is removed over time and the metal is ferrous then it may rust or corrode being potentially dangerous or in need of replacement, which again would cost money. The paint also stops the metal from overheating in summer.
Both products are concreted down preventing them from moving either due to wind or being moved by people/vandals. The bench being concreted down or on concrete means there is a solid surface for people to stand on if the surrounding grass or soil is wet or muddy.
The bin’s overall size is of a good height so can be accessed by adults but may be to big for smaller children, though the product does fit in with the urban environment. The overall size of the gap for hands is large so allows several hands to use the bin at once.
This is compared to the bench which similarly may be to o high for young, small children.


This is the insert if anyone wants it (the bench and bin) http://filestore.aqa.org.uk/subjects...-INS-JUN12.PDF

A MASSIVE MASSIVE THANK YOU TO ANYONE WHO REPLIES, I APPRECIATE IT BEYOND BELIEVE!!! THANK YOU!!!

And to anyone doing the exam tomorrow, the best of luck guys
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Nic Nac
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(Original post by Supertod)
Could someone do me a quick summary of a kettle?
What aspects?
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Supertod
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(Original post by Nic Nac)
What aspects?
Any that are relevant I guess, sorry for being so vague! I've studied some other products but I didn't get around to doing a kettle.
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Nic Nac
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I'll have a quick look in the textbook and get back to you shortly if you want I think I saw someone mention a kettle on this thread but no sure if it's relevant/helpful
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sbtrkt1
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[QUOTE=Nic Nac;42947318]Sorry for my delay in reply but here goes

QUESTION 1
Describe simple workshop tests which could be carried out to a range of materials inorder to investigate two of the mechanical properties from the list below.
  • Hardness
  • Tensile strength
  • Toughness
  • Ductility and malleability (2 x 6 marks)



[0|1] Hardness: The Rockwell, Brinell and Vickers tests are all tests that can be carried out to investigate the hardness of a material. 1 The Rockwell test is mainly done on finished products to check its quality and the hardness value is shown on a dial. The Brinell test is when an indent is made into a test piece using a small circular hammer and the size of the indent is then measured. The Vickers test is when a diamond shape is forced into the test piece and then the size of the indent is then measured with help from a microscope.

This shows good knowledge of the tests but does not go into enough detail about why they are carried out eg, hardness is tested to ensure that the product is fit for its application such as a car door. I would focus on one of the test and try to link it to the key word of "workshop". Not all work shops will have a microscope for testing and it is not necessarily simple. Hardness can be tested in a work shop using a simple dot punch, hammer and a piece of sample material. You also have not mentioned anything about consistency in the testing. Such as apply the same force to all materials, use the same thickness material etc.
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Nic Nac
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Do you have the AQA A2 textbook at all? Kettles are mentioned for environment on page 163 and for safety on page 174/175
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Supertod
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(Original post by Nic Nac)
Do you have the AQA A2 textbook at all? Kettles are mentioned for environment on page 163 and for safety on page 174/175
Ah yes I do, thanks mate. How are you feeling for this exam?
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Nic Nac
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[QUOTE=sbtrkt1;42948062]
(Original post by Nic Nac)
Sorry for my delay in reply but here goes

QUESTION 1
Describe simple workshop tests which could be carried out to a range of materials inorder to investigate two of the mechanical properties from the list below.
  • Hardness
  • Tensile strength
  • Toughness
  • Ductility and malleability (2 x 6 marks)



[0|1] Hardness: The Rockwell, Brinell and Vickers tests are all tests that can be carried out to investigate the hardness of a material. 1 The Rockwell test is mainly done on finished products to check its quality and the hardness value is shown on a dial. The Brinell test is when an indent is made into a test piece using a small circular hammer and the size of the indent is then measured. The Vickers test is when a diamond shape is forced into the test piece and then the size of the indent is then measured with help from a microscope.

This shows good knowledge of the tests but does not go into enough detail about why they are carried out eg, hardness is tested to ensure that the product is fit for its application such as a car door. I would focus on one of the test and try to link it to the key word of "workshop". Not all work shops will have a microscope for testing and it is not necessarily simple. Hardness can be tested in a work shop using a simple dot punch, hammer and a piece of sample material. You also have not mentioned anything about consistency in the testing. Such as apply the same force to all materials, use the same thickness material etc.
THANK YOU SO MUCH!! Will try and rewrite a better answer
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sbtrkt1
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Kettles for safety:

Iron -

Cut off switch: an iron could include an auto-off function that turns the iron off after it has been upright for more than 5 minutes.

Thick insulated cord: Cannot be burned easily and will be durable enough for its life time. Retractable cord to prevent tripping. Cable grommet.

Ergonomic handle: makes the product easy to hold, helps prevent it from being dropped.

Center of gravity: The product is weighted at the bottom to stop it from falling over when placed. Can be used with an ironing board that may have a holder.

Heating plate is protected by thermoset polymer which is resistant to heat.

Fuse in plug prevents the iron causing electric shock to the user.

Safety instructions included with product.

BSI kitemark ensures the product is safe and has been and will be regularly tested.


Polymer Kettles for ergonomics:

Large chunky handle, easy to grip. Side mounted handle for comfortable wrist position, stops the steam from going over hand.

Lid is positioned on the top of the kettle with textured grips to aid opening/removal.

Spout is large enough for water to be poured in, this means lid does not have to be removed

Detachable base allows safer use when filling over a sink.

Polymer body is an insulator, touching side will be hot but not burn the user.

Slim design allows one cup boiling reducing the weight of the kettle making it easier to life.

Life cycle assessment of a kettle is on page 163.

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susiesalmon
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#54
(Original post by Supertod)
Any that are relevant I guess, sorry for being so vague! I've studied some other products but I didn't get around to doing a kettle.

kettle
safety: polymer instead of metal so wont burn consumer, because plastic is a heat insulator. Has detachable base, separating the kettle from the wire, so when filling at a sink there is no risk of electrocution.
ergonomics: big chunky handle on the side for a good grip, with finger space. The handle on the side makes pouring easier. Lid on top of the kettle with finger grip to aid opening. Some kettles can have a thermochromic patch which will change colour when kettle is boiled. This is ideal for saving energy as it indicates whether it is necessary to be reboiled :-)
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Nic Nac
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(Original post by Supertod)
Ah yes I do, thanks mate. How are you feeling for this exam?
So-so, there are parts I know really well then parts I don't know at all. it's the specialist vocal and stuff I struggle on. need to recap AS too
Think it could be okay though looking at past grade boundaries and mark schemes.

How about you?
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susiesalmon
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(Original post by MissNix)
Yeah =) Right now i just need to stay focused though, I haven't completely finished the textbook yet =/ *on page 180 atm*
not far to go though! i've been revising media cause i have that aswell tomorrow so i've literally forgotten all my product design!
good luck tomorrow!
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awhitewood
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It might be abit late but there is an amazing app on the App Store for apple... It's called Product Design and its yellow with product design in white writing! It's so good and has everything broken down into smaller categories... It also has a quiz to test yourself and its saves the score.. It costs just over £1 but is totally worth it!

Also does anyone have any idea or clues on what topics are going to come up??


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Supertod
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(Original post by sbtrkt1)
Kettles for safety:

Iron -

Cut off switch: an iron could include an auto-off function that turns the iron off after it has been upright for more than 5 minutes.

Thick insulated cord: Cannot be burned easily and will be durable enough for its life time. Retractable cord to prevent tripping. Cable grommet.

Ergonomic handle: makes the product easy to hold, helps prevent it from being dropped.

Center of gravity: The product is weighted at the bottom to stop it from falling over when placed. Can be used with an ironing board that may have a holder.

Heating plate is protected by thermoset polymer which is resistant to heat.

Fuse in plug prevents the iron causing electric shock to the user.

Safety instructions included with product.

BSI kitemark ensures the product is safe and has been and will be regularly tested.


Polymer Kettles for ergonomics:

Large chunky handle, easy to grip. Side mounted handle for comfortable wrist position, stops the steam from going over hand.

Lid is positioned on the top of the kettle with textured grips to aid opening/removal.

Spout is large enough for water to be poured in, this means lid does not have to be removed

Detachable base allows safer use when filling over a sink.

Polymer body is an insulator, touching side will be hot but not burn the user.

Slim design allows one cup boiling reducing the weight of the kettle making it easier to life.

Life cycle assessment of a kettle is on page 163.


(Original post by susiesalmon)
kettle
safety: polymer instead of metal so wont burn consumer, because plastic is a heat insulator. Has detachable base, separating the kettle from the wire, so when filling at a sink there is no risk of electrocution.
ergonomics: big chunky handle on the side for a good grip, with finger space. The handle on the side makes pouring easier. Lid on top of the kettle with finger grip to aid opening. Some kettles can have a thermochromic patch which will change colour when kettle is boiled. This is ideal for saving energy as it indicates whether it is necessary to be reboiled :-)
Thanks guys!

(Original post by Nic Nac)
So-so, there are parts I know really well then parts I don't know at all. it's the specialist vocal and stuff I struggle on. need to recap AS too
Think it could be okay though looking at past grade boundaries and mark schemes.

How about you?
It's very dependent on what questions come up. Some I could absolutely nail and others I wouldn't have a clue. I don't usually leave things this down to luck but it's not my main focus. Have you just been using the text book to revise?
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sbtrkt1
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[QUOTE=Nic Nac;42948243]
(Original post by sbtrkt1)

THANK YOU SO MUCH!! Will try and rewrite a better answer

This is my answer that I wrote a while back:

A range of tests can be carried out to test the hardness and tensile strength of a material. The mechanical properties will vary depending on the material.

Tensile strength is tested in a workshop by applying a constant force to a section of the material. This could be concrete, wood or steel. A newton meter or similar device could be used to test the load being applied. Thin materials that are ductile may 'neck' under load causing deformation. The Young's modulus of metals can be found. Tensile testing can also be tested using a more accurate device such as a tensile testing machine. This uses a motor and a load cell to accurately plot a graph which can be used for a range of applications. Testing rubber tires can be done this way.

Hardness can be tested in a workshop by using a Hammer, dot punch and a section of material. The amount of force applied to the material using the hammer needs to be consistent throughout the testing of multiple materials. This can be difficult so alternative methods such as the brinell test may produce a more accurate result. This involves dropping a hardened steel ball of a consistent mass from the same height towards a section of material. A dent will be formed and the area can be measured using a microscope. This type of testing may be carried out in the car industry to test the strength of certain metals in car body work.
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Nic Nac
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[QUOTE=sbtrkt1;42948561]
(Original post by Nic Nac)


This is my answer that I wrote a while back:

A range of tests can be carried out to test the hardness and tensile strength of a material. The mechanical properties will vary depending on the material.

Tensile strength is tested in a workshop by applying a constant force to a section of the material. This could be concrete, wood or steel. A newton meter or similar device could be used to test the load being applied. Thin materials that are ductile may 'neck' under load causing deformation. The Young's modulus of metals can be found. Tensile testing can also be tested using a more accurate device such as a tensile testing machine. This uses a motor and a load cell to accurately plot a graph which can be used for a range of applications. Testing rubber tires can be done this way.

Hardness can be tested in a workshop by using a Hammer, dot punch and a section of material. The amount of force applied to the material using the hammer needs to be consistent throughout the testing of multiple materials. This can be difficult so alternative methods such as the brinell test may produce a more accurate result. This involves dropping a hardened steel ball of a consistent mass from the same height towards a section of material. A dent will be formed and the area can be measured using a microscope. This type of testing may be carried out in the car industry to test the strength of certain metals in car body work.
Thank you!! Do you know what grade/mark your answer got out of curiosity??
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