Choosing a 'doss' subject at university? Watch

Jespy
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Hello,

To be honest I am just looking for some opinions from my fellow TSR members, basically what is the logic in choosing a degree that will not get you any further in life progression?

My argument is this, I am enrolled on a chemistry based course with a 99% graduate employment rate after 6 months, however I have friends and flatmates on courses which, at my university, have employment rates of about 10% or lower.

I realise that people say you should go to university to study something you enjoy, however in this climate, where we are going to accumulate around £40-50k debt over our degrees, I don't understand how someone could set themselves into a degree which has no real career progression possibilities. for me, I would be too scared to even consider a low employment course, it would worry me constantly throughout my studies!

I myself work as a photographer 4 days a week, as well as working as a freelance graphic designer. although these jobs are to pay my living expenses (student finance doesn't even cover my rent) I know that I would never take either of these subjects at uni, as the knowledge I have gained from working and practicing far outweighs the knowledge most people get from a full 3 year degree.

Any input would be greatly appreciated!


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TenOfThem
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(Original post by Jespy)
Hello,

To be honest I am just looking for some opinions from my fellow TSR members, basically what is the logic in choosing a degree that will not get you any further in life progression?

My argument is this, I am enrolled on a chemistry based course with a 99% graduate employment rate after 6 months, however I have friends and flatmates on courses which, at my university, have employment rates of about 10% or lower.

I realise that people say you should go to university to study something you enjoy, however in this climate, where we are going to accumulate around £40-50k debt over our degrees, I don't understand how someone could set themselves into a degree which has no real career progression possibilities. for me, I would be too scared to even consider a low employment course, it would worry me constantly throughout my studies!

I myself work as a photographer 4 days a week, as well as working as a freelance graphic designer. although these jobs are to pay my living expenses (student finance doesn't even cover my rent) I know that I would never take either of these subjects at uni, as the knowledge I have gained from working and practicing far outweighs the knowledge most people get from a full 3 year degree.

Any input would be greatly appreciated!


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Even with the debt university is about far more than the employment opportunities

I think the first priority should be reading a subject that interests you

Then the second priority should be attending a university that you will enjoy for 3 years

Then worry about employment



The debt is an irrelevance really as the monthly payments are relatively so small anyway


(Original post by Alex_Jones)
...
I guess that you disagree?
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Economi
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A university rep once told us during an open day that just spending the time at uni was worth the debt. The degree was just a bonus.

Not the best advice for a room of sixth formers, but it goes to show some people just want to "go to uni".
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Jespy
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(Original post by TenOfThem)
Even with the debt university is about far more than the employment opportunities

I think the first priority should be reading a subject that interests you

Then the second priority should be attending a university that you will enjoy for 3 years

Then worry about employment



The debt is an irrelevance really as the monthly payments are relatively so small anyway
I would disagree with the debt is small quote, my brother is a pharmacist and is paying around £200 a month in student loan debt, which only goes to pay off the interest that has accumulated.

And why, for example, would people choose to take a subject like philosophy, where the work is difficult throughout the degree, but it doesn't give you any increase in opportunities?


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bertstare
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Because YOLO that's why
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Alex-Torres
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What is the subject with 10% employment opportunities?
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TenOfThem
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(Original post by Jespy)
I would disagree with the debt is small quote, my brother is a pharmacist and is paying around £200 a month in student loan debt, which only goes to pay off the interest that has accumulated.
from a salary of ... ...

And why, for example, would people choose to take a subject like philosophy, where the work is difficult throughout the degree,
For interest
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Zetharus
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(Original post by Alex-Torres)
What is the subject with 10% employment opportunities?
Probably Art, football coaching and religion studies


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Disen
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(Original post by Alex-Torres)
What is the subject with 10% employment opportunities?
**** if I know. Anyone with functioning eyes should be able to see that this thread has been created solely for the purpose of stroking the OP's ego.
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anonymouspie227
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I think it's good that people study what they want to and what they love. However, I think people should perhaps study things with decent employment rates/ where they'll get a job also, as you don't want to leave uni and not have a job for ages. But that's just my two cents.
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Jespy
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(Original post by Kirboz)
**** if I know. Anyone with functioning eyes should be able to see that this thread has been created solely for the purpose of stroking the OP's ego.
wow, how rude. I was asking for other people's opinions on a topic that came up in conversation the other day. I thought TSR would be the right place to do it, seeing as we are all students after all.

and how does ego come into this? although my course has a HIGH employment rate, the entry grades are low, it's not particularly academic, it is almost the equivalent of an apprenticeship...so it's not like I'm boasting about my intelligence.


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Jespy
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(Original post by Zetharus)
Probably Art, football coaching and religion studies


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yep not far off there, I believe Dance and childhood studies is there too...although with the latter many go onto study a pgce, so the employment stats don't really count.


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slightly
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(Original post by Zetharus)
Probably Art, football coaching and religion studies


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To be fair though, low employment statistics for Fine Art courses are irrelevant.

Art students want to be artists, not secure a graduate job at Goldman Sachs. The purpose of studying art is different to basically every other course. Having said that, I do think some people going down this road need to have a long think about it first.
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Jespy
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(Original post by slightly)
To be fair though, low employment statistics for Fine Art courses are irrelevant.

Art students want to be artists, not secure a graduate job at Goldman Sachs. The purpose of studying art is different to basically every other course. Having said that, I do think some people going down this road need to have a long think about it first.
Yep good point, never thought about that
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Disen
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(Original post by slightly)
To be fair though, low employment statistics for Fine Art courses are irrelevant.

Art students want to be artists, not secure a graduate job at Goldman Sachs. The purpose of studying art is different to basically every other course. Having said that, I do think some people going down this road need to have a long think about it first.
Or a BMus, perhaps. Quite a few of my friends went into freelancing classical events. Although, most of them went and secured jobs at music schools/ conservatoires; got jobs as peripatetics; got a PGCE and taught theory, as well as a mixture of the lattermost two. They all seem to be pretty happy.
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River85
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(Original post by Jespy)
I would disagree with the debt is small quote, my brother is a pharmacist and is paying around £200 a month in student loan debt, which only goes to pay off the interest that has accumulated.
In that case he must have more than the "typical" student debt (ie. government student loan).

He won't be charged real interest on the government loan. If he is a graduate then any interest charged will be set at the rate of inflation.

And why, for example, would people choose to take a subject like philosophy, where the work is difficult throughout the degree, but it doesn't give you any increase in opportunities?
It can improve opportunities. They will still have a degree at the end so therefore able to apply for graduate jobs? They are also able to improve transferable skills. Not to mention get involved in university activities, which can lead to a new career.

Also, for interest. Just because it's hard doesn't mean to say that people don't find it interesting.
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SpicyStrawberry
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People look at the cost of university as though it's going to massively impact their lives post-graduation. It isn't. The amount you pay back is tiny in comparison to your income - nothing at all if you earn under £21k - and you don't even see that money go into and leave your account. What's important is that you study a subject you have an aptitude for and have an interest in, after all there are no guarantees you will get a well paid job easily after graduation and if you hated the university experience doing a subject you hated it's a massive waste of time and government money.

What I'm basically trying to say is, a degree is better than no degree (many grad jobs don't specify particular degree subjects) and if you choose a course because you think it's easy and not for the right reasons you'll likely live to regret it.
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Alex_Jones
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(Original post by TenOfThem)
Even with the debt university is about far more than the employment opportunities

I think the first priority should be reading a subject that interests you

Then the second priority should be attending a university that you will enjoy for 3 years

Then worry about employment



The debt is an irrelevance really as the monthly payments are relatively so small anyway




I guess that you disagree?
I do. Employment shouldn't be last on the list of priorities this whole university culture that seems to promote not caring and 'living it large' for 3 years is why so many people are struggling to get a decent job or any job at all for that matter. I don't understand why there can't be a balance between enjoyment and job prospects
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TenOfThem
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(Original post by Alex_Jones)
I do. Employment shouldn't be last on the list of priorities this whole university culture that seems to promote not caring and 'living it large' for 3 years is why so many people are struggling to get a decent job or any job at all for that matter. I don't understand why there can't be a balance between enjoyment and job prospects
Thank you for responding

It would have been nice to have seen your comments at the time that you negged my post



I am not talking about "living it large"

I am talking about spending 3 years studying a subject that interests you in a city and a university that you would enjoy



If employment were the only priority then people should choose vocational degrees or, even better, work at an apprenticeship
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OedipusTheKing
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(Original post by Jespy)
Hello,

To be honest I am just looking for some opinions from my fellow TSR members, basically what is the logic in choosing a degree that will not get you any further in life progression?

My argument is this, I am enrolled on a chemistry based course with a 99% graduate employment rate after 6 months, however I have friends and flatmates on courses which, at my university, have employment rates of about 10% or lower.

I realise that people say you should go to university to study something you enjoy, however in this climate, where we are going to accumulate around £40-50k debt over our degrees, I don't understand how someone could set themselves into a degree which has no real career progression possibilities. for me, I would be too scared to even consider a low employment course, it would worry me constantly throughout my studies!

I myself work as a photographer 4 days a week, as well as working as a freelance graphic designer. although these jobs are to pay my living expenses (student finance doesn't even cover my rent) I know that I would never take either of these subjects at uni, as the knowledge I have gained from working and practicing far outweighs the knowledge most people get from a full 3 year degree.

Any input would be greatly appreciated!


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Because they enjoy the subject and want to educate themselves further? Since when did education cease to become an intrinsic good?
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