A* at A level students - how much revision did you do Watch

JPL9457
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did you spend none/some/most/all of your free periods revising

when in the year did you start revising for your june exams

how much would you do each day when you started revising

thanks
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Joseph Joestar
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Tutorful says that 1 in 4 students get some help. Might be worth looking into some form of private tutoring?

MyTutor also has some good reviews.
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mischief-managed
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I'm still waiting on my A-Level results but I'm predicted two A*s and since you don't have any other answers I thought I'd weigh in a little

I spent the vast majority of my free periods sleeping, if I'm honest. Those that I didn't spend sleeping I spent catching up on missed work or hunting down teachers to ask them about work I didn't understand. I only had three free periods a week, though.

I started making revision notes for my exams around the start of April, but I didn't start properly revising until May. When I was still at Sixth Form, I'd use my evenings to revise for maybe 2 or 3 hours a day, and then when we went on study leave I'd usually get up at around 10 and revise until 12, then have lunch and watch a bit of TV, then revise from 2ish until 6ish, have dinner and watch more TV, then revise 9ish until I got too tired to read my notes, and then I'd go to bed and stay up until 1am, which in hindsight wasn't the best idea for a "ready mind" but hey-ho.

I think the reason I got away with being so lazy with my revision schedule was because I had worked quite hard throughout the year during lessons and I made sure I understood everything at the time that we learnt it so that when it came to revision I knew what was going on. If I was revising something that I found complicated I'd spend a lot longer on it, and if I was revising something that I found simple, I'd spend like an hour on it and then give myself the rest of the day off. I knew people who spent literally every waking hour revising when it came to exams, and I don't think it ever really did them any good- they tended to be much more tired and stressed out on the exam day.

Anyway the moral of the story is, if you put a lot of work and effort in during the entire year, then the revision period becomes much easier and you don't have to push yourself as hard

Also, with regards to the A*, past papers are vital to getting high marks- the same questions come up over and over again so you can basically learn where the marks are, it makes it much easier to get over 90%!
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TheBigJosh
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Not much,
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Clare726
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I used my free periods for doing homework really. I didn't start studying until mid-may, and i know that i should have and could have done much more revision than i did. I would spend a few hours each day revising and writing notes. Apart from English, i think i crammed two hours before! As for french, i only really learnt for the writing part. So yeah... dreading results.
I got 100% in my geography module in January and i spent 12 days revising for that one subject for about 3-4 hours a day
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Dilzo999
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(Original post by mischief-managed)
I'm still waiting on my A-Level results but I'm predicted two A*s and since you don't have any other answers I thought I'd weigh in a little

I spent the vast majority of my free periods sleeping, if I'm honest. Those that I didn't spend sleeping I spent catching up on missed work or hunting down teachers to ask them about work I didn't understand. I only had three free periods a week, though.

I started making revision notes for my exams around the start of April, but I didn't start properly revising until May. When I was still at Sixth Form, I'd use my evenings to revise for maybe 2 or 3 hours a day, and then when we went on study leave I'd usually get up at around 10 and revise until 12, then have lunch and watch a bit of TV, then revise from 2ish until 6ish, have dinner and watch more TV, then revise 9ish until I got too tired to read my notes, and then I'd go to bed and stay up until 1am, which in hindsight wasn't the best idea for a "ready mind" but hey-ho.

I think the reason I got away with being so lazy with my revision schedule was because I had worked quite hard throughout the year during lessons and I made sure I understood everything at the time that we learnt it so that when it came to revision I knew what was going on. If I was revising something that I found complicated I'd spend a lot longer on it, and if I was revising something that I found simple, I'd spend like an hour on it and then give myself the rest of the day off. I knew people who spent literally every waking hour revising when it came to exams, and I don't think it ever really did them any good- they tended to be much more tired and stressed out on the exam day.

Anyway the moral of the story is, if you put a lot of work and effort in during the entire year, then the revision period becomes much easier and you don't have to push yourself as hard

Also, with regards to the A*, past papers are vital to getting high marks- the same questions come up over and over again so you can basically learn where the marks are, it makes it much easier to get over 90%!
May I ask what subjects you are doing?
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UnknownError
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(Original post by TheBigJosh)
Not much, I'm naturally intelligent and with a bit of luck and common sense, A*'s are easy to crack.
So your doing A Levels in P.E media studies and applied business... Nice.


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JPL9457
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(Original post by UnknownError)
So your doing A Levels in P.E media studies and applied business... Nice.


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haha true
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TheBigJosh
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No I did Geography, French and Combined English and A* A* A
Think maybe you should get your head out your ass, because you've just offended anyone who does those subject.
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UnknownError
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(Original post by TheBigJosh)
No I did Geography, French and Combined English and A* A* A
Think maybe you should get your head out your ass, because you've just offended anyone who does those subject.
Oh well, they'll get over it.


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mischief-managed
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(Original post by Dilzo999)
May I ask what subjects you are doing?
I did Biology, Chemistry, Maths and German, although I have to say I really didn't like German A2 and I knew there was no way I was going to get my predicted grade (A) so I didn't revise for it except for an hour or two the night before. I'm predicted A* in Biology and Maths and A in Chemistry. Maths revision was mostly just past papers (they took about an hour each and I did one most days during study leave), so it was Bio and Chem that took up most of my revision time.
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alow
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(Original post by JPL9457)
did you spend none/some/most/all of your free periods revising

when in the year did you start revising for your june exams

how much would you do each day when you started revising

thanks
Haven't got my A Level results yet, but I will be getting them on the 15th.

Should be getting 3-4 A*s and the only revision I did was all the past papers for each subject, never looked at my notes or any revision guides/textbooks.
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JPL9457
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people on TSR are so clever
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PythianLegume
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(Original post by alow)
Haven't got my A Level results yet, but I will be getting them on the 15th.

Should be getting 3-4 A*s and the only revision I did was all the past papers for each subject, never looked at my notes or any revision guides/textbooks.
Pretty much this for the sciences/maths. The most important part of getting good grades is not the revision. Revising is pointless if you didn't know the stuff in the first place. You have to work at it throughout the year, making sure you understand everything (not just being able to recite the answer, but actually understanding it). If you do that, then the exams aren't much of a hassle. But it's also about doing the correct amount of revision - be honest with your self-assessment. For me, and the guy I quoted, just the past papers worked. If you need to do more, then of course do. But also don't overwork yourself. If you don't need A*s, then don't waste time revising 10 hours a day to get them, because once you have a degree, no-one will care whether you got As or A*s.

(This is different for some subjects with less understanding and more rote learning - for example, research and case studies in psychology/geography).
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JPL9457
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(Original post by PythianLegume)
Pretty much this for the sciences/maths. The most important part of getting good grades is not the revision. Revising is pointless if you didn't know the stuff in the first place. You have to work at it throughout the year, making sure you understand everything (not just being able to recite the answer, but actually understanding it). If you do that, then the exams aren't much of a hassle. But it's also about doing the correct amount of revision - be honest with your self-assessment. For me, and the guy I quoted, just the past papers worked. If you need to do more, then of course do. But also don't overwork yourself. If you don't need A*s, then don't waste time revising 10 hours a day to get them, because once you have a degree, no-one will care whether you got As or A*s.

(This is different for some subjects with less understanding and more rote learning - for example, research and case studies in psychology/geography).
so would i be correct in thinking you mean do a little bit of revision (in the sense of revising until you understand the particular topic) for every subject from day one?
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PythianLegume
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(Original post by JPL9457)
so would i be correct in thinking you mean do a little bit of revision (in the sense of revising until you understand the particular topic) for every subject from day one?
Do enough to make sure you understand the content. Revising is the least effective way to do this - you have to be hands-on in the lesson - if you don't completely get it, ask the teacher to help you set it straight. Never leave a lesson thinking 'what was that about' or 'but what about this' - ask those questions in the lesson. If you need to revise after then do, but I found that paying attention in the lessons worked, and completing the homework was the best revision.

The general rule is little and often - you can get an A* by revising 10 hours a day in the months/weeks before exams, but that's a stupid way to learn.
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JPL9457
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(Original post by PythianLegume)
Do enough to make sure you understand the content. Revising is the least effective way to do this - you have to be hands-on in the lesson - if you don't completely get it, ask the teacher to help you set it straight. Never leave a lesson thinking 'what was that about' or 'but what about this' - ask those questions in the lesson. If you need to revise after then do, but I found that paying attention in the lessons worked, and completing the homework was the best revision.

The general rule is little and often - you can get an A* by revising 10 hours a day in the months/weeks before exams, but that's a stupid way to learn.
little and often from day one, or little and often from like study leave?
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PythianLegume
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(Original post by JPL9457)
little and often from day one, or little and often from like study leave?
From day one - it requires very little effort to engage properly in a lesson, rather than receiving it passively.
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Luketreherne
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(Original post by JPL9457)
haha true
Applied Business is mostly coursework , though it is easy to get the high marks. it is very time consuming when 15-20 pages for each piece of coursework is what is normally expected.
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Homeboy Hotel
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(Original post by JPL9457)
did you spend none/some/most/all of your free periods revising

when in the year did you start revising for your june exams

how much would you do each day when you started revising

thanks
I hated doing 'revision' in my free periods, I used them more as getting tedious homework out of the way earlier during the year and then used them as getting my notes prepared/printed etc from February onwards. I could never do past papers in my free periods.

When in the year? March I got all my notes prepared, then ready to 'learn' and do past papers

How much? On school days...4-7, Weekends 12-6. Hours slowly increased slower to exams, then dropped off during exam season
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