A* at A level students - how much revision did you do Watch

medicine12
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#21
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#21
(Original post by JPL9457)
did you spend none/some/most/all of your free periods revising

when in the year did you start revising for your june exams

how much would you do each day when you started revising

thanks
I did chemistry, biology and maths for a level and got A,A*, A* respectively and A at physics AS level.
i used my free periods for homework so I didn't have much homework in the evening and could spend the night looking over what I did in class. My exams were in mid may and I started about 2 months before but throughout the year kept up to date with my work. I would do around 3-4 hours a night and then when I got of for study leave I would work around 8-10 hours a day (with breaks!!)
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manic_fuzz
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For sciences I made notes before the lessons on what the lesson would be on, really easy considering we literally just worked through the book - I'd generally reduce a double page spread to at most an A4 side, also used lots of coloured pens to highlight words I should remember. For EngLit for notes I just annotated every poem + play and compiled a list of critical citations. Then I would read these during some free periods in the run up to exams, reading notes is really casual and you can just do it while watching TV or whatever once you've read them a couple of times because you really recognise the content of each page anyway. Also, did lots of past papers (especially helpful for maths). Usually I would do the past paper with the mark scheme so I could instantly review what examiners were specifically looking for - especially helpful for biology long questions where sometimes a stupidly narrow range of answers warrants points. Examiners reports were also really useful to make sure I didn't slip up where others had.

Plus made sure my coursework was up to scratch, if that's not brill then it can be the difference between an A and an A*.
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Dilzo999
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(Original post by mischief-managed)
I did Biology, Chemistry, Maths and German, although I have to say I really didn't like German A2 and I knew there was no way I was going to get my predicted grade (A) so I didn't revise for it except for an hour or two the night before. I'm predicted A* in Biology and Maths and A in Chemistry. Maths revision was mostly just past papers (they took about an hour each and I did one most days during study leave), so it was Bio and Chem that took up most of my revision time.
True it is like a double edged sword that if you rely too much on past papers then you'll be more shocked when something unexpected comes up like in the recent C3 and M1 exams.
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passionate27
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#24
(Original post by Jatz07)
19 hours a day for 5 A*s
For real? :lolwut:

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ermm
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I got 3 A*s and 2 As. I would say the most important thing is to learn what the examiners want to read from past papers. I got an A in chemistry even though many answers were correct, they would be marked wrong as it wasn't word for word what the mark scheme said. So knowing the content is most important but also exam technique is really important. I can only speak for the science subjects though
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passionate27
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(Original post by Jatz07)
Lol no I'm only joking, I've only just finished my GCSEs and started AS next year.

However, regards to the question if you really want 4 or 5 A*s at A level, the amount of revision you do depends on your ability to understand and how quickly you can cover the content.

If you really want straight 4/5 A*s start revising now but only do about 2 or 3 hours a day from now... That way you would have finished a majority of content before school starts and you would have known everything by Christmas in detail. Hence, you can spend the next year just doing hardcore intensive revision with no stress and just doing loads of Past Papers

This year when I start school I am planning to do 4-5 hours revision on a weekday and 11-12 hours on the weekend.
It sounds crazy and I know people do a lot less, but if you really want the high UMS at AS which gives you an advantage
at A2 then the amount of revision you do must be rigorous but not stressful

Jatz
Haha you got me there, I'm in the position as you.
I have started so we seem to also have similar ideas and thanks

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passionate27
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(Original post by Jatz07)
Haha awesome!

Which A levels are you doing next year?
What grades are you aiming for at GCSE?

What do you want to do in Uni?

Jatz
Will be doing biology, chemistry, physics and maths (maybe a 5th one)
I thought out of the 9 GCSEs I'll get 5-6 A* but don't think I'll anymore

I want to do medicine or geology maybe

What about you?

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passionate27
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(Original post by Jatz07)
Wow, that's coincidental

I am doing: Biology, Chemistry, Maths, History and maybe a 5th one to self teach

Haha, I want to do medicine or dentistry
well, what I wanted at GCSE and what I get may be two different stories lol... we'll see how results go!


splendid! ... have you thought of any uni's?

I'm thinking barts as 1st choice

Jatz
We have A LOT in common haha, umm not yet tbh but I did contact Cambridge admissioner not like I will ever get into it

Worried about result day

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PostgradMatt
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#29
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Well I revised for about a week in total and got DDC. Very pleased with the double D.
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username1039383
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ill post in 2 weeks time
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passionate27
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#31
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(Original post by Jatz07)
same

My parents expect like A*s and I don't want to disappoint them

Jatz
Same, idk why but my family and friend's are expecting me to get A*'s :'( even when I have told them all I won't be getting good results
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JPL9457
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(Original post by PostgradMatt)
Well I revised for about a week in total and got DDC. Very pleased with the double D.
you inspire me
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Dilzo999
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#33
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(Original post by Jatz07)
Lol no I'm only joking, I've only just finished my GCSEs and started AS next year.

However, regards to the question if you really want 4 or 5 A*s at A level, the amount of revision you do depends on your ability to understand and how quickly you can cover the content.

If you really want straight 4/5 A*s start revising now but only do about 2 or 3 hours a day from now... That way you would have finished a majority of content before school starts and you would have known everything by Christmas in detail. Hence, you can spend the next year just doing hardcore intensive revision with no stress and just doing loads of Past Papers

This year when I start school I am planning to do 4-5 hours revision on a weekday and 11-12 hours on the weekend.
It sounds crazy and I know people do a lot less, but if you really want the high UMS at AS which gives you an advantage
at A2 then the amount of revision you do must be rigorous but not stressful

Jatz
I'm 100% sure you'll give up in a week or so. That much revision is just too much even for 100 UMS. I could understand if you had that plan if you were failing and had a week before your exam or something but at the start seriously I doubt you'd be able to keep that up for very long. Also realistically if you do want 4/5 A* depending on which subjects they're I'd say around 2-3 hours a day splitting up subjects each day that way you don't over do it and you'll be able to actually remember more and be more calm. I should be 1/3 of the way done for an A* in further maths and I'd say the main thing for you to do is pay attention in class, if you don't understand something make sure you do by the end of the day it's pretty much what I did and past papers until exams.
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xMr_BrightSide
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#34
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Well I'm predicted one A*, but I thought I'd chip in anyway.

My free periods were mainly spent writing essays (normally due in that day), not much outside reading or anything like that.

The key to knowing the topics is to make sure you're paying attention all year round - if you truly 'get' a topic, your revision will be much easier. Speaking of revision, I started in May and did a few hours a day - don't force it by doing a bazillion hours, it really is counterproductive!

But seriously, the number one tip I can give is to put the effort into understanding early on, then your revision will just be a case of refreshing your memory, and all of the necessary links/info will just fall into place.
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Silvermead
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I'm predicted A* A* A* A (in a stunning exaggeration of my ability on my school's part) and although I haven't got my results yet the best advice I would give you is not to panic yourself into doing 20 hours of revision per day because it will probably end up doing more harm than good

One thing I have learnt after doing AS and A Levels for the past two years is that it seems to be more about playing the game than it is knowing a tonne of information. I remember in my politics exam in January I was inserting whacky theories I had read in extraneous books in an attempt to sound more interesting and stick out to the examiner but ended up with a B whereas in my economics exam I laid out my answers exactly as my teacher told me and stuck to everything that was in the textbook and turned out a couple of marks away from an A* (significantly, I thought I had ****ed up economics and done quite well in politics which goes to show that there's more to be said for writing in the exact style examiners desire of you than there is being original or necessarily having facts coming out of your ear).

With hindsight the best advice I can give you, at least for arts subjects like mine, is to learn the key points of your textbooks and read over them a few times but moreover to practice EXAM TECHNIQUE and using mark schemes to ensure you're saying exactly what you need to be saying in the examiner's eyes. Of course it's not ideal (at least in my view) that some textbook writer/examiner's opinion should come above originality and creativity but you've got to play the system!!!!!!

So don't overexert yourself because exam technique, which isn't hugely difficult to master after you've looked through all the mark schemes available and clear patterns have emerged, is probably 75% of the battle in my experience. Make sure you're being efficient in that regard!

Of course I am talking solely about essay subjects so if you're doing sciences this is probably all irrelevant
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TheBigJosh
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(Original post by Silvermead)
I'm predicted A* A* A* A (in a stunning exaggeration of my ability on my school's part) and although I haven't got my results yet the best advice I would give you is not to panic yourself into doing 20 hours of revision per day because it will probably end up doing more harm than good

One thing I have learnt after doing AS and A Levels for the past two years is that it seems to be more about playing the game than it is knowing a tonne of information. I remember in my politics exam in January I was inserting whacky theories I had read in extraneous books in an attempt to sound more interesting and stick out to the examiner but ended up with a B whereas in my economics exam I laid out my answers exactly as my teacher told me and stuck to everything that was in the textbook and turned out a couple of marks away from an A* (significantly, I thought I had ****ed up economics and done quite well in politics which goes to show that there's more to be said for writing in the exact style examiners desire of you than there is being original or necessarily having facts coming out of your ear).

With hindsight the best advice I can give you, at least for arts subjects like mine, is to learn the key points of your textbooks and read over them a few times but moreover to practice EXAM TECHNIQUE and using mark schemes to ensure you're saying exactly what you need to be saying in the examiner's eyes. Of course it's not ideal (at least in my view) that some textbook writer/examiner's opinion should come above originality and creativity but you've got to play the system!!!!!!

So don't overexert yourself because exam technique, which isn't hugely difficult to master after you've looked through all the mark schemes available and clear patterns have emerged, is probably 75% of the battle in my experience. Make sure you're being efficient in that regard!

Of course I am talking solely about essay subjects so if you're doing sciences this is probably all irrelevant
Have a cookie, well done.
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Charlie_Ellie
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(Original post by UnknownError)
So your doing A Levels in P.E media studies and applied business... Nice.


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3mmz
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(Original post by manic_fuzz)
For sciences I made notes before the lessons on what the lesson would be on, really easy considering we literally just worked through the book - I'd generally reduce a double page spread to at most an A4 side, also used lots of coloured pens to highlight words I should remember. For EngLit for notes I just annotated every poem + play and compiled a list of critical citations. Then I would read these during some free periods in the run up to exams, reading notes is really casual and you can just do it while watching TV or whatever once you've read them a couple of times because you really recognise the content of each page anyway. Also, did lots of past papers (especially helpful for maths). Usually I would do the past paper with the mark scheme so I could instantly review what examiners were specifically looking for - especially helpful for biology long questions where sometimes a stupidly narrow range of answers warrants points. Examiners reports were also really useful to make sure I didn't slip up where others had.

Plus made sure my coursework was up to scratch, if that's not brill then it can be the difference between an A and an A*.
did you always get your teacher to mark your past papers?
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3mmz
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#39
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#39
(Original post by Silvermead)
I'm predicted A* A* A* A (in a stunning exaggeration of my ability on my school's part) and although I haven't got my results yet the best advice I would give you is not to panic yourself into doing 20 hours of revision per day because it will probably end up doing more harm than good

One thing I have learnt after doing AS and A Levels for the past two years is that it seems to be more about playing the game than it is knowing a tonne of information. I remember in my politics exam in January I was inserting whacky theories I had read in extraneous books in an attempt to sound more interesting and stick out to the examiner but ended up with a B whereas in my economics exam I laid out my answers exactly as my teacher told me and stuck to everything that was in the textbook and turned out a couple of marks away from an A* (significantly, I thought I had ****ed up economics and done quite well in politics which goes to show that there's more to be said for writing in the exact style examiners desire of you than there is being original or necessarily having facts coming out of your ear).

With hindsight the best advice I can give you, at least for arts subjects like mine, is to learn the key points of your textbooks and read over them a few times but moreover to practice EXAM TECHNIQUE and using mark schemes to ensure you're saying exactly what you need to be saying in the examiner's eyes. Of course it's not ideal (at least in my view) that some textbook writer/examiner's opinion should come above originality and creativity but you've got to play the system!!!!!!

So don't overexert yourself because exam technique, which isn't hugely difficult to master after you've looked through all the mark schemes available and clear patterns have emerged, is probably 75% of the battle in my experience. Make sure you're being efficient in that regard!

Of course I am talking solely about essay subjects so if you're doing sciences this is probably all irrelevant
great advice

i am doing politics on my gap year. any tips you can give? did you do edexcel?
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manic_fuzz
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(Original post by 3mmz)
did you always get your teacher to mark your past papers?
Nope, I could mark the science papers well enough myself. I only did a couple of mocks in EngLit in class so obviously they were both marked. For psychology it would have been helpful to have had them marked but my teacher was ill - admittedly the marking scheme wasn't as ambiguous as for EngLit so it wasn't too bad.
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