jessica_anne_clu
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I've just been reading through my notes on Energy supply for muscle contraction and I understand everything apart from one section.

My notes say that slow-twitch fibres rely largely on ATP generated by aerobic respiration, whereas fast-twitch fibres rely mainly on existing supplies of ATP, phosophocreatine and ATP generated by anaerobic respiration.
When distinguishing differents between the two types of muscle fibre, my notes say:

Slow-twitch fibres have a large store of myoglobin (which is an oxygen store). This makes sense as oxygen is required for respiration. However, it then says that they have little glycogen present (which is a glucose store). Surely the slow-twitch fibres should have high numbers of glycogen to provide all of the glucose required for aerobic respiration?

So confused! :confused::confused:
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Fiona93
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Slow twich fibres do have a source if glycogen to provide glucose for respiration!
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jessica_anne_clu
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(Original post by Fiona93)
Slow twich fibres do have a source if glycogen to provide glucose for respiration!
Yes but it says that slow-twitch fibres have little store of glycogen whereas fast-twitch fibres have a large store of glycogen, which is what I don't understand
Surely slow-twitch fibres should have large stores of myoglobin and glycogen? :confused:
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Fiona93
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(Original post by jessica_anne_clu)
Yes but it says that slow-twitch fibres have little store of glycogen whereas fast-twitch fibres have a large store of glycogen, which is what I don't understand
Surely slow-twitch fibres should have large stores of myoglobin and glycogen? :confused:
Hmm odd. Well I've just had a check in my book as well to make sure and it says that for slow twitch fibres there is a large store of myoglobin and a supply of glycogen(large or small amount, I don't know!). For the fast twitch it says there is a large store of phosphocreatine but doesn't mention glycogen! If the notes you have made are confusing you I would recommend going back through your exercise book and have a look!
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Otaku101
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That's strange, my notes say that slow twitch fibres have lots of glycogen storage! ^^
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Fiona93
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(Original post by Otaku101)
That's strange, my notes say that slow twitch fibres have lots of glycogen storage! ^^
That's really weird then. Maybe it's just to do with the exam boards we're on!
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jessica_anne_clu
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(Original post by Fiona93)
Hmm odd. Well I've just had a check in my book as well to make sure and it says that for slow twitch fibres there is a large store of myoglobin and a supply of glycogen(large or small amount, I don't know!). For the fast twitch it says there is a large store of phosphocreatine but doesn't mention glycogen! If the notes you have made are confusing you I would recommend going back through your exercise book and have a look!
Ahh okay, thanks for clearing that up! I'll look in two of my biology books and see what is says in there! Are you doing AQA?
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jessica_anne_clu
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(Original post by Otaku101)
That's strange, my notes say that slow twitch fibres have lots of glycogen storage! ^^
Hmm I'm not sure why this is what exam board are you doing? Mine's AQA but it may be different across boards!
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Fiona93
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(Original post by jessica_anne_clu)
Ahh okay, thanks for clearing that up! I'll look in two of my biology books and see what is says in there! Are you doing AQA?
yeah I am doing AQA!
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jessica_anne_clu
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(Original post by Fiona93)
yeah I am doing AQA!
Ahh okay, good luck for the exam tomorrow if you are doing Unit 5!

Do you happen to know about DNA Sequencing: the Sanger Method by any chance? I just can't get my head around it

Thanks
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Fiona93
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(Original post by jessica_anne_clu)
Ahh okay, good luck for the exam tomorrow if you are doing Unit 5!

Do you happen to know about DNA Sequencing: the Sanger Method by any chance? I just can't get my head around it

Thanks
And good luck to you!
Umm it's a bit confusing to explain but basically you have 4 test tubes, each with all the different nucleotides in and the single strands of DNA to be sequenced(like a template) And in each different test tube you have either an A,T,C or G terminator nucleotide. These modified so that they join onto the complementary base but don't allow anything to join next to it, so it's basically cutting the sequence short. Using primers and DNA polymerase you get the bases to join on to the single strand you want to sequence. Then using gel electrophoresis on each terminator test tube you would be able to determine the first base in the sequence. The one that has travelled the furthest is the lightest DNA fragment and so must have terminated at the beginning. If this is say from the terminator A test tube, you know that the first base was complementary to adenine. If The second lightest fragment was from the terminator C test tube you know that the second base in the sequence Is complementary to cytosine. And so on...

I'm not sure if this helps at all! But this is just the way my brain works haha
Good luck in the exam!!
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jessica_anne_clu
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(Original post by Fiona93)
And good luck to you!
Umm it's a bit confusing to explain but basically you have 4 test tubes, each with all the different nucleotides in and the single strands of DNA to be sequenced(like a template) And in each different test tube you have either an A,T,C or G terminator nucleotide. These modified so that they join onto the complementary base but don't allow anything to join next to it, so it's basically cutting the sequence short. Using primers and DNA polymerase you get the bases to join on to the single strand you want to sequence. Then using gel electrophoresis on each terminator test tube you would be able to determine the first base in the sequence. The one that has travelled the furthest is the lightest DNA fragment and so must have terminated at the beginning. If this is say from the terminator A test tube, you know that the first base was complementary to adenine. If The second lightest fragment was from the terminator C test tube you know that the second base in the sequence Is complementary to cytosine. And so on...

I'm not sure if this helps at all! But this is just the way my brain works haha
Good luck in the exam!!
Thank you! Certainly clears up some of the questions I was having, good luck for your exam tomorrow too!!! xx
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Machares
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Ayyy lad,

Both types of Muscle fibres have a store of Glycogen. The key difference is that Fast-Twitch Muscle Fibres have a higher number of Glycolytic Enzymes in order to break down Glycogen into usable Glucose quicker.

Much love
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GayleO
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Both types of fibres contain glycogen stores, though the slow-twitch contains a smaller glycogen store. Yes, it needs this as a supply of glucose for aerobic respiration, but these fibres are also well-supplied with blood, so it has an external source of glucose that it can rely on for respiration, rather than being exclusively dependent on intracellular stores of glucose. The fast-twitch fibres are not well supplied with blood, so need to have a larger storage of glycogen from which to hydrolyse glucose units for anaerobic respiration (glycolysis).

Hope that's helpful!
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