A*/A students - From when do you start revision until your exam?

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SexiestNameEver
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#1
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For both GCSE and A-Level.

How many months/weeks or even days ago do you start revision???
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J_W-x
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From looking at friends who are A*/A students their revision doesn't stop (a-level)
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Chlorophile
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I can only speak for GCSE. For most of my subjects, I started serious revision about a week before my exam, partially because of terrible time management and partially because I knew from experience that I could probably get away with it. Having said that, for French, German and History I started revising more than a month in advance and I started revising the Sciences several weeks before.
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Anon9
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like the week before my first exam. (A levels).
Which is why I am a borderline a/* student rather than a straight * student, don't recommend leaving it as late as I do.


GCSE's the same but could get away with it and get *s.

I do however mean proper full on revision when I start though, 6 hours a day.
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acecahill39
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It does not matter how many weeks they take to revise, it just whether they revise smartly or not. I usually take an hour a day to revise for about 3 subjects everyday even if the exams are 6 months away. That way, you could always be prepared & not confuse yourself or panic before the exam in time to come.
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eggfriedrice
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In AS I started a few weeks before, didn't really work out so for A2 I started about a month before.
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kate113855
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At AS about 3 or 4 weeks before. At A2 you kinda have no choice but to start at least 2 months before if you want to cover the entire syllabus and remember it well. I did bits of revision throughout the year before my A2 exams and then proper constant revision started about a month and a half before exams began.

Although (!) I highly recommend cramming. Obviously do your long-term revision, but definitely cram info in a day before and before you leave for the exam. It works really well for me, but probs 'cause it's combined with revision from months before.
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bertstare
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GCSEs - Average of around 3 days per subject

A Levels - Month and a half overall

Usually around 4-5 hrs of revision per day
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username1129244
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GCSE: Couple of weeks before first exam. I did two weeks for RE and got an A, 2 ums of A* whereas I spent 3 days on History and got 100 UMS. I'm not showing off but I'm saying it doesn't matter how early you start. What matters is how well you use the time. For most GCSE's 1 week of smart revision (many hours a day) should get you A/A* but you could do less if you have the desire to cram.

A-Level: More important, so for essay subjects give yourself a month and for maths based ones 2 weeks can do. This is of course for smart revision and not staring at a wall for hours to say I've done 4 hours a day. But we all know the exam timetable can be annoying. I had 2.5 days to learn a physics module and I crammed 18 hours straight a day. All the extra detail is just to stress so no one makes the mistake of thinking they'd do we'll if they start early. If you do revision the right way then you can do well even if you leave it late.
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IShootLikeAGirl
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for GCSE depending on the subject ranging from a week before to a day before as i was stupid and lazy then.

for AS, about a month before each exam for serious revision but ive been reading my notes etc. all year long.
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cookie99
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Gcse - couple of weeks before exam 2-3
a level - couple of months before exam 2-3
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Cluck
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For GCSEs, two days before the exam for about 4 hours, and then up to 6 hours the day before. This has served me perfectly so far, though I know I'll have to do more next year.
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Theflyingbarney
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I'm going to be playing devil's advocate here, I suspect, but personally I never found it all that useful to revise early (at least until I got to uni, where the difficulty and sheer amount of content necessitated longer-term plans). At GCSE in particular though, but also at A-level, I personally reckon it's a lot better to just be as efficient and thorough as possible when you're learning stuff the first time round in class, right from the start of the year. Someone above said it's all about revising smart - I'd go one step further than that and say it's learning smart in the first place that will get you furthest.

Make sure you really try and take everything in, rather than just copying it down, and ask questions if you're the remotest bit unsure about everything. That way the amount that you're able to commit to long-term memory the first time round is greatly increased, hence less revision. Then once that's done, you can legitimately get away with just cramming for the stubborn bits that won't stick to get them in your short-term memory just for the exam. And similarly there's no need to slave away for long hours if you're properly prepared - there's no point wearing yourself out and getting more and more stressed; I find myself that I gain far more from a few hours off meaning I'm completely relaxed for the exam, than from extra cramming that maybe gains me a couple more facts.
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Luke7456
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This will sound bizarre and nonsense but try revising After the exam as well as before it. Consciousness does not directly follow linear time.
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