shybrowngirl
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Sorry I don't know which section to put this question. I was wondering what would happen if I start an undergraduate open uni course for psychology and transfer myself to different uni for my masters and phd. Would they reject me if I don 't have any a levels? I'm not going to rely on my alevels atm. Thanks
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emmakh123
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the courses after your psychology degree to become a clinical psychologist are very competitive. therefore they will choose the best students - i.e. best degree class, best uni, best a-levels, best gcses etc, to narrow down the applications. you will have a better chance with a-levels.
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iammichealjackson
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Im pretty sure no graduate job asks for a levels- they're just needed to get onto a degree! As the person above says, you would need to do well in your degree. Also, have you done anything equivalent to a levels? A levels can be useful to get skills/knowledge that will be useful for actually doing well in a degree (which will matter).
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punctuation
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(Original post by shybrowngirl)
Sorry I don't know which section to put this question. I was wondering what would happen if I start an undergraduate open uni course for psychology and transfer myself to different uni for my masters and phd. Would they reject me if I don 't have any a levels? I'm not going to rely on my alevels atm. Thanks
If you have a degree at the open uni with good marks (First) then you should be able to go on. Not certain though.
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*Elizabeth*
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(Original post by shybrowngirl)
Sorry I don't know which section to put this question. I was wondering what would happen if I start an undergraduate open uni course for psychology and transfer myself to different uni for my masters and phd. Would they reject me if I don 't have any a levels? I'm not going to rely on my alevels atm. Thanks
Hey

Depends on specific applications, positions and postgraduate courses.

I had to put my A-level grades in each of my doctoral applications (PhD and Professional Doctorate in Health Psychology). The current application for the clinical psychology doctorate includes a question on A-levels (and I think there's space for an A-level equivalent). But further up the academic ladder, university marks/classifications become more important.

Clinical Psychology is only one option for psychology graduates. But, yes, clinical psychology is very competitive and some universities look at A-level grades to select candidates. However, people with poor A-levels or no A-levels (ie access to university courses) have got onto clinical psychology doctorates with excellent university marks and relevant experience.

For clinical psychology doctorates, some universities (such as UCL and Bath) look at A-level grades and factor in good A-level grades whilst selecting the top performing applicants for interview. Other universities place more emphasis on experience and good marks at universities. Also, consider that some universities implement selection tests before interview and they interview the top % scores in these selection tests. So applicants performing well in the selection tests could be invited to interview, despite any lower marks. Although, in the cases of applicants with tied and similar scores, I think they select applicants with the strongest academic marks and experience.

Other psychology doctorates are less competitive though.

Friends of mine have got onto the clinical psychology doctorate with good A-levels, good university marks (2.1 at undergraduate level), master qualifications and excellent relevant experience. One friend got on with a First at undergradaute level, an MSc a PhD and relevant experience. If you've got good university marks, relevant experience, strong references and interview well, then you maybe in with a chance, but it also depends on competition from other applicants.

Best of luck
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shybrowngirl
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(Original post by *Elizabeth*)
Hey

Depends on specific applications, positions and postgraduate courses.

I had to put my A-level grades in each of my doctoral applications (PhD and Professional Doctorate in Health Psychology). The current application for the clinical psychology doctorate includes a question on A-levels (and I think there's space for an A-level equivalent). But further up the academic ladder, university marks/classifications become more important.

Clinical Psychology is only one option for psychology graduates. But, yes, clinical psychology is very competitive and some universities look at A-level grades to select candidates. However, people with poor A-levels or no A-levels (ie access to university courses) have got onto clinical psychology doctorates with excellent university marks and relevant experience.

For clinical psychology doctorates, some universities (such as UCL and Bath) look at A-level grades and factor in good A-level grades whilst selecting the top performing applicants for interview. Other universities place more emphasis on experience and good marks at universities. Also, consider that some universities implement selection tests before interview and they interview the top % scores in these selection tests. So applicants performing well in the selection tests could be invited to interview, despite any lower marks. Although, in the cases of applicants with tied and similar scores, I think they select applicants with the strongest academic marks and experience.

Other psychology doctorates are less competitive though.

Friends of mine have got onto the clinical psychology doctorate with good A-levels, good university marks (2.1 at undergraduate level), master qualifications and excellent relevant experience. One friend got on with a First at undergradaute level, an MSc a PhD and relevant experience. If you've got good university marks, relevant experience, strong references and interview well, then you maybe in with a chance, but it also depends on competition from other applicants.

Best of luck
Wow thank your for reply, that helped a lot. I'll try with work experiences and uni marks. If that does not work out then I will figure something else
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BenTheBlue
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(Original post by emmakh123)
the courses after your psychology degree to become a clinical psychologist are very competitive. therefore they will choose the best students - i.e. best degree class, best uni, best a-levels, best gcses etc, to narrow down the applications. you will have a better chance with a-levels.
Late late response! To be fair, your views may have changed by now, but this isn't strictly true. They choose candidates based on various factors. The degree class being one (the best uni is useful for making it easier to do well at uni), but they don't look at A Levels or GCSEs as this would be unfair on various other students. For example, students who improve significantly who had poor or no GCSEs. Once you're qualified, you're qualified and it's all down to experience at that point and accomplishments in roles.
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