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    Whenever the fact I try to practice Stoicism comes up and I try to explain it or aspects of it I sometimes find myself struggling so I thought making a thread about being a Stoic would help me get better at it and maybe help anyone asking and myself learn more about Stoicism.

    Stoic is often used to just mean emotionless but that's quite misleading and there's far more to Stoicism than that! The two main principles of Stoicism that I keep to are the control and overcoming of destructive emotions and the attempt to be a good, moral person. The two are closely linked.

    So if you don't know anything about Stoicism, have a question about Stoicism or how I practice it or have a criticism of Stoicism please share it!

    For those of you who dislike my views on your religion, here is your chance to slam my beliefs!
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    (Original post by The Angry Stoic)
    Whenever the fact I try to practice Stoicism comes up and I try to explain it or aspects of it I sometimes find myself struggling so I thought making a thread about being a Stoic would help me get better at it and maybe help anyone asking and myself learn more about Stoicism.

    Stoic is often used to just mean emotionless but that's quite misleading and there's far more to Stoicism than that! The two main principles of Stoicism that I keep to are the control and overcoming of destructive emotions and the attempt to be a good, moral person. The two are closely linked.

    So if you don't know anything about Stoicism, have a question about Stoicism or how I practice it or have a criticism of Stoicism please share it!

    For those of you who dislike my views on your religion, here is your chance to slam my beliefs!
    So anyone who attempts to be a good, moral person and tries not to let emotions cloud their judgment would be classed as a stoic?
    Also can someone follow a religion and also practice stoicism? Or is that not possible because someone's religious can cloud their judgement.?
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    (Original post by SaFa1237)
    So anyone who attempts to be a good, moral person and tries not to let emotions cloud their judgment would be classed as a stoic?
    Also can someone follow a religion and also practice stoicism? Or is that not possible because someone's religious can cloud their judgement.?
    They certainly are Stoic traits. Anyone can be a Stoic to any degree. You could call yourself Stoic if you wanted. It's not an exclusive club.

    A religious person can also try to practice Stoicism but I'd think it would be very difficult to fully embrace it. One of the main themes of Stoicism is that your drive to be good and happy come from within and that all you need to do so is within you. There isn't much room or need for a god. Religion could also cloud your judgment of what is good, what is important and can encourage destructive emotions. However many religions such as Christianity were greatly influenced by Stoicism.

    Heaven is a real stumbling block for me and I'd imagine most Stoics. Religions say Heavan is a perfect place where everyone is happy. For me happiness comes from within. From your control of destructive emotions. A person who has completely mastered Stoicism would be no more happy intrinsically in Heavan than in Hell. The idea that true happiness comes from a place and not yourself is strange to a Stoic.
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    Does being an "angry" person not prevent one from being a stoic ? Unless your username is an intended oxymoron.
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    (Original post by Voland)
    Does being an "angry" person not prevent one from being a stoic ? Unless your username is an intended oxymoron.
    Yes it is a joke!

    However it's ok to be angry. Sometimes experiencing emotions is an immediate and unavoidable thing especially with sudden, shocking events. We are only human. The stoic part is controlling that emotion; not immediately acting upon it unwisely and then rationally examine the source of the anger and realising if and why the emotional response itself was irrational and destructive. Anger is almost also illogical, destructive and no use so is certainly an emotion that needs a lot of control.

    It makes me so angry!
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    Given that reason is not objective but is dependent on perception, are you not simply subordinating all your passions/desires/etc for the sake of your own perception and consequently achieving nothing but repression of emotion?
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    (Original post by Tufto)
    Given that reason is not objective but is dependent on perception, are you not simply subordinating all your passions/desires/etc for the sake of your own perception and consequently achieving nothing but repression of emotion?
    Why is reason subjective? Surely something is illogical or it is not?

    In each of our own lives isn't it our own perception of our happiness what is ultimately important?

    It's not the repression of emotion but its control. You need not forget your desires or passions and embrace the positive emotions they bring while contemplating the loss of your desire and learning to control the destructive emotions that loss would bring. Which is very difficult I must say!
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    (Original post by The Angry Stoic)
    Why is reason subjective? Surely something is illogical or it is not?

    In each of our own lives isn't it our own perception of our happiness what is ultimately important?

    It's not the repression of emotion but its control. You need not forget your desires or passions and embrace the positive emotions they bring while contemplating the loss of your desire and learning to control the destructive emotions that loss would bring. Which is very difficult I must say!
    I am currently somewhat inebriated, so I shall have to answer you sometime tomorrow.
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    (Original post by Tufto)
    I am currently somewhat inebriated, so I shall have to answer you sometime tomorrow.
    Haha! Ok. I eagerly await your reply.
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    (Original post by The Angry Stoic)
    They certainly are Stoic traits. Anyone can be a Stoic to any degree. You could call yourself Stoic if you wanted. It's not an exclusive club.

    A religious person can also try to practice Stoicism but I'd think it would be very difficult to fully embrace it. One of the main themes of Stoicism is that your drive to be good and happy come from within and that all you need to do so is within you. There isn't much room or need for a god. Religion could also cloud your judgment of what is good, what is important and can encourage destructive emotions. However many religions such as Christianity were greatly influenced by Stoicism.

    Heaven is a real stumbling block for me and I'd imagine most Stoics. Religions say Heavan is a perfect place where everyone is happy. For me happiness comes from within. From your control of destructive emotions. A person who has completely mastered Stoicism would be no more happy intrinsically in Heavan than in Hell. The idea that true happiness comes from a place and not yourself is strange to a Stoic.
    Thanks for that. It was very informative.
    I must admit I'd never heard of Stoicism until I 'met' you. I'm interested to know what led you to practicing it, if that's OK with you.
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    (Original post by SaFa1237)
    Thanks for that. It was very informative.
    I must admit I'd never heard of Stoicism until I 'met' you. I'm interested to know what led you to practicing it, if that's OK with you.
    I've always really liked history and Stoicism was the philosophy of many Greeks and Romans I've learned about, most notable Cato the Younger. He's my avatar. That's how I heard of it. When I first read about it I didn't understand it well so I didn't have much interest in following it but in my gap year I've become more and more interested. I decided to buy some Stoic books and trying to develope some Stoic traits and techniques and I really liked it. Then when one of my family got leukaemia it really helped with that so I decided to continue.
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    (Original post by The Angry Stoic)
    I've always really liked history and Stoicism was the philosophy of many Greeks and Romans I've learned about, most notable Cato the Younger. He's my avatar. That's how I heard of it. When I first read about it I didn't understand it well so I didn't have much interest in following it but in my gap year I've become more and more interested. I decided to buy some Stoic books and trying to develope some Stoic traits and techniques and I really liked it. Then when one of my family got leukaemia it really helped with that so I decided to continue.
    Do you think stoic traits can be developed subconsiously, as barriers and a thick skin to protect oneself from emotional turmoil?

    A bit of background:
    I have a chronic illness with no permanent cure (It's nothing too major). When I first succumbed to it, I had never been so terrified and depressed. Eventually, I accepted my state and after subsequent bouts, I almost completely stopped thinking about it. At around the same period in my life, I noticed I became desensitized to many things including deaths of friends and relatives - which left me feeling indifferent, unlike before.

    ^Are these traits of a stoic? Sometimes I feel I'm just playing hide and seek with the world. (Sorry for making you my shrink)

    I am very ignorant on the philosophy of stoicism but It clearly has quite a lot of benefit.
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    You know too much Number Six.
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    (Original post by lcddvd)
    Do you think stoic traits can be developed subconsiously, as barriers and a thick skin to protect oneself from emotional turmoil?

    A bit of background:
    I have a chronic illness with no permanent cure (It's nothing too major). When I first succumbed to it, I had never been so terrified and depressed. Eventually, I accepted my state and after subsequent bouts, I almost completely stopped thinking about it. At around the same period in my life, I noticed I became desensitized to many things including deaths of friends and relatives - which left me feeling indifferent, unlike before.

    ^Are these traits of a stoic? Sometimes I feel I'm just playing hide and seek with the world. (Sorry for making you my shrink)

    I am very ignorant on the philosophy of stoicism but It clearly has quite a lot of benefit.
    It's not Stoic to not feal emotions. It's Stoic to feal the emotions, control them and then overcome them all through rational thinking.

    Take a long term illness. You may feal sad or angry that you have it but a Stoic would examine these emotions and see that they are ultimately irrational. You cannot control the fact you have become ill and although there may be actions you can take to help with the illness it is ultimately out of your control whether you have the illness or not. A main principle of Stoicism is not to worry about things beyond your control. You cannot control the fact you have become ill but you can control your reaction to it. Sadness and anger won't make you any less sick and will usually just make you feal worse.

    That is one of the most useful tools is Stoicism for controlling emotion.recognising what you can and cannot control and not worrying about what you cannot as it is ultimately futile to do so. What you should concentrate on is your own emotions, ideas and actions as they are the only things you can truly control.

    Don't become numb to your feelings or ignore them. Examine them, control them and focus on your actions.
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    (Original post by The Angry Stoic)
    It's not Stoic to not feal emotions. It's Stoic to feal the emotions, control them and then overcome them all through rational thinking.

    Take a long term illness. You may feal sad or angry that you have it but a Stoic would examine these emotions and see that they are ultimately irrational. You cannot control the fact you have become ill and although there may be actions you can take to help with the illness it is ultimately out of your control whether you have the illness or not. A main principle of Stoicism is not to worry about things beyond your control. You cannot control the fact you have become ill but you can control your reaction to it. Sadness and anger won't make you any less sick and will usually just make you feal worse.

    That is one of the most useful tools is Stoicism for controlling emotion.recognising what you can and cannot control and not worrying about what you cannot as it is ultimately futile to do so. What you should concentrate on is your own emotions, ideas and actions as they are the only things you can truly control.

    Don't become numb to your feelings or ignore them. Examine them, control them and focus on your actions.
    I will try and put work into your advice. This baloney TSR is not letting me pos rep you, but I'll be stoic about it and just say thanks.
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    (Original post by lcddvd)
    I will try and put work into your advice. This baloney TSR is not letting me pos rep you, but I'll be stoic about it and just say thanks.
    Your welcome! I've only touched on it here so I'd suggest reading more on the subject if you are interested.
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    Are you a Vulcan? Is Spock one of your role models?
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    (Original post by Some random guy)
    Are you a Vulcan? Is Spock one of your role models?
    No I've never really watched Star Trek. TheVulcans are probably based on Stoic ideas though.
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    (Original post by The Angry Stoic)
    Haha! Ok. I eagerly await your reply.
    Right, I'm fully sober, so let's do this.

    It's not the repression of emotion but its control. You need not forget your desires or passions and embrace the positive emotions they bring while contemplating the loss of your desire and learning to control the destructive emotions that loss would bring. Which is very difficult I must say!
    Hmm, fair enough. I actually agree with you there. I think the alcohol in my system was making me unduly provocative.

    However, I do have some objection to this part:

    (Original post by The Angry Stoic)
    Why is reason subjective? Surely something is illogical or it is not?
    Not necessarily. Something is logical or is not, but we can never be totally accurate ourselves. Every person's perception of reason and logic is inevitable different; otherwise, all the philosophical and religious problems of the world would already have been totally solved, which they clearly haven't been. This is my main gripe with stoicism; without a perfect reason free of our own perceptions, then it becomes another ideology based on a somewhat arbitrary value.

    In each of our own lives isn't it our own perception of our happiness what is ultimately important?
    Are you, Jacob, the most vocal antitheist on this forum, saying that people should live and let live according to their own perception of happiness?
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    (Original post by Tufto)
    Right, I'm fully sober, so let's do this.



    Hmm, fair enough. I actually agree with you there. I think the alcohol in my system was making me unduly provocative.

    However, I do have some objection to this part:



    Not necessarily. Something is logical or is not, but we can never be totally accurate ourselves. Every person's perception of reason and logic is inevitable different; otherwise, all the philosophical and religious problems of the world would already have been totally solved, which they clearly haven't been. This is my main gripe with stoicism; without a perfect reason free of our own perceptions, then it becomes another ideology based on a somewhat arbitrary value.



    Are you, Jacob, the most vocal antitheist on this forum, saying that people should live and let live according to their own perception of happiness?
    You think I'm the most prominent Antitheist on TSR? I'm touched

    And yes everyone should live to meet their own idea of happiness. If people wish to percieve the world in a way that contradicts facts that's fine. What I do have a problem with is people who try to force their beliefs on others either through law, culture or through imposition of a false morality. I find people's beliefs, that may make them happy, particularly repugnant when they deride and promise punishment to anyone who does not believe or obey. I wouldn't mind religions if they kept it to themselves and that includes not preaching to their children!

    As for logically finding what is good it is true it is difficult. Stoic ethics are usually based on intent. If you are trying to good you are doing a good act. The problem is you could be trying to do good and actually be doing evil. That's why it's important for a Stoic to spend as much time as possible contemplating what is good, what effect his actions will have and whether his intentions are really are in the targets best intentions. Discussion is also good. Sometimes talking with others can change your own view point if you are open minded.

    I'm not saying its perfect but it's better than nothing. And much better than a religious moral system of absolute, arbitrary morals.
 
 
 
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