R-Radeon
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Hello everyone,

I'm going into year 12 and was hoping if anyone could recommend some books related
to chemical engineering specifically. I have searched high and low and not found as many
as are available for other engineering fields such as civil. I have seen Cambridge's list for chemical but it only has two (that I will read).

Thanks
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Voland
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All of Coulson &Richardson's volumes and Perry's Handbook for general info.
Heat Transfer - Kern, Lienhard&Lienhard.
Reaction Engineering - Octave Levenspiel.
Process Control - Corripio - Principles and Practice of Automated Process Control.
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x-Sophie-x
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(Original post by R-Radeon)
Hello everyone,

I'm going into year 12 and was hoping if anyone could recommend some books related
to chemical engineering specifically. I have searched high and low and not found as many
as are available for other engineering fields such as civil. I have seen Cambridge's list for chemical but it only has two (that I will read).

Thanks
I've seen the Cambridge one too; I'd advise to only read the first one, the second one is just

Where are you thinking of applying? (:

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R-Radeon
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(Original post by x-Sophie-x)
I've seen the Cambridge one too; I'd advise to only read the first one, the second one is just

Where are you thinking of applying? (:

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Well im not fully sure yet, but it certainly is annoyying how so few uni's offer chemical engineering compared to say.. mechanical.

what about you ?
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R-Radeon
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(Original post by Voland)
All of Coulson &Richardson's volumes and Perry's Handbook for general info.
Heat Transfer - Kern, Lienhard&Lienhard.
Reaction Engineering - Octave Levenspiel.
Process Control - Corripio - Principles and Practice of Automated Process Control.
some of these are very expensive, i'll see if there are any in the library.

have you read any, they look very complex
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x-Sophie-x
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(Original post by R-Radeon)
Well im not fully sure yet, but it certainly is annoyying how so few uni's offer chemical engineering compared to say.. mechanical.

what about you ?
I know, but at least it'll help narrow down our options; we don't want too many choices!

Not certain yet but Manchester, Nottingham, Imperial, Cambridge, Birmingham, Bath, Loughborough and Leeds.
Obviously I need to rethink everything but I haven't visited all of them yet.
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R-Radeon
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(Original post by x-Sophie-x)
I know, but at least it'll help narrow down our options; we don't want too many choices!

Not certain yet but Manchester, Nottingham, Imperial, Cambridge, Birmingham, Bath, Loughborough and Leeds.
Obviously I need to rethink everything but I haven't visited all of them yet.

Yeah, that is true! haha.

Just to be sure that we've seen the same Cambridge list, is this the book you said
was better?

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Introduction...ref=pd_sim_b_1


So what made you chose chemical engineering over the others ?
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x-Sophie-x
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(Original post by R-Radeon)
Yeah, that is true! haha.

Just to be sure that we've seen the same Cambridge list, is this the book you said
was better?

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Introduction...ref=pd_sim_b_1


So what made you chose chemical engineering over the others ?
Yes that was the one. They're quite similar but the second book is just a bit more difficult to get to grips with (personally).

Well I only ever considered aerospace engineering apart from chemical so it wasn't too tough a decision.

I like the kinds of jobs that I would be doing in chemical though, especially jobs in pharmaceuticals, energy and the oil and gas sector You?
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R-Radeon
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(Original post by x-Sophie-x)

I like the kinds of jobs that I would be doing in chemical though, especially jobs in pharmaceuticals, energy and the oil and gas sector You?
Similar reason, I also like the jobs available to you from studying chemical engineering, as that is what has always interested me. Stuff like fractional distillation columns for crude oil etc..
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multani008
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An invaluable book I have used during my chem eng course at Leeds is Elementary Principles of Chemical Processes by Richard Felder and Ronald Rousseau, 3rd edition. This will tell you how to perform all mass and energy balance calculations that chemical engineers need and provides many worked examples in an easy to understand language. I picked this copy up on ebay for around £15 so hunt around

Perry's Handbook is the bible of chem eng and almost everything is in there (hence the size of it!)

For reaction engineering use:
Octave Levenspiele (rammed full of equations, some explanations)
Elements of reaction engineering, Fogler (big yellow book, very good explanations)

For process control use any really that gives you an understanding of measured, controlled and distrurbance variables, feedforward and feedback loops, transfer functions.

For chemical thermodynamics use Schaum's Outlines, thermodynamics with chemical applications, 2nd edition.

Those should give you an idea of the theroetical side of chemical engineering and the things you can apply it to.
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x-Sophie-x
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(Original post by multani008)
An invaluable book I have used during my chem eng course at Leeds is Elementary Principles of Chemical Processes by Richard Felder and Ronald Rousseau, 3rd edition. This will tell you how to perform all mass and energy balance calculations that chemical engineers need and provides many worked examples in an easy to understand language. I picked this copy up on ebay for around £15 so hunt around

Perry's Handbook is the bible of chem eng and almost everything is in there (hence the size of it!)

For reaction engineering use:
Octave Levenspiele (rammed full of equations, some explanations)
Elements of reaction engineering, Fogler (big yellow book, very good explanations)

For process control use any really that gives you an understanding of measured, controlled and distrurbance variables, feedforward and feedback loops, transfer functions.

For chemical thermodynamics use Schaum's Outlines, thermodynamics with chemical applications, 2nd edition.

Those should give you an idea of the theroetical side of chemical engineering and the things you can apply it to.
Can I just ask, where did you get most of your books from?

I'm considering chemical engineering at university but it's dependant on my AS grades so I don't want to spend loads on a book and then end up not doing it, and the book being useless.

Related books were £50+ the last time I checked, and I'd rather not spend that kind of money on a book I'd hardly understand.

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multani008
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(Original post by x-Sophie-x)
Can I just ask, where did you get most of your books from?

I'm considering chemical engineering at university but it's dependant on my AS grades so I don't want to spend loads on a book and then end up not doing it, and the book being useless.

Related books were £50+ the last time I checked, and I'd rather not spend that kind of money on a book I'd hardly understand.

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I have only purchased 3 books and they were second hand from either ebay/amazon/friends or the university. The rest I simply borrow/renew from Edward Boyle library at Leeds.
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x-Sophie-x
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(Original post by multani008)
I have only purchased 3 books and they were second hand from either ebay/amazon/friends or the university. The rest I simply borrow/renew from Edward Boyle library at Leeds.
Ah okay thanks

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multani008
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(Original post by x-Sophie-x)
Ah okay thanks

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Tbh when you start you can borrow all the books you need and just use those! I only got the ones that I overused
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x-Sophie-x
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(Original post by multani008)
Tbh when you start you can borrow all the books you need and just use those! I only got the ones that I overused
I shall do, this is just for extra reading, I'm in year 12 at the moment (:

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x-Sophie-x
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(Original post by Voland)
All of Coulson &Richardson's volumes and Perry's Handbook for general info.
Heat Transfer - Kern, Lienhard&Lienhard.
Reaction Engineering - Octave Levenspiel.
Process Control - Corripio - Principles and Practice of Automated Process Control.
Is the Heat Transfer easily understood or is it a jumble of complex maths?

I'm asking because I'm thinking of buying it but I don't want do spend loads of something I won't understand.

Thank you (:
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Smack
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(Original post by x-Sophie-x)
Is the Heat Transfer easily understood or is it a jumble of complex maths?
I've used the Lienhard & Lienhard book shown and it's not particularly light reading.

Like almost every subject in engineering, the amount of maths involved depends on the level you are using it at and the application. You could be taught to solve many common industrial heat transfer problems without having to use anything more complicated than multiplication and exponents. The maths used in a lot of textbooks can get very complicated.
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x-Sophie-x
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(Original post by Smack)
I've used the Lienhard & Lienhard book shown and it's not particularly light reading.

Like almost every subject in engineering, the amount of maths involved depends on the level you are using it at and the application. You could be taught to solve many common industrial heat transfer problems without having to use anything more complicated than multiplication and exponents. The maths used in a lot of textbooks can get very complicated.
Ah okay, thanks for that.
At least you share the opinion that its not light reading. I read through a couple of pages a few weeks ago and it scared the hell out of me
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multani008
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(Original post by x-Sophie-x)
I shall do, this is just for extra reading, I'm in year 12 at the moment (:

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Sure sounds good to me and I wish I did some extra reading before I started the course although after 3 fun years you get plenty of opportunities to read up on material that is tricky so really no need to worry

Any more questions please fire away.
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x-Sophie-x
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(Original post by multani008)
Sure sounds good to me and I wish I did some extra reading before I started the course although after 3 fun years you get plenty of opportunities to read up on material that is tricky so really no need to worry

Any more questions please fire away.
I wouldn't be so keen if it wasn't for my personal statement haha.

Thank you
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