ImranB)
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okay so basically I'm studying towards my finance and accounting degree at a UK university. I have always wanted to do law but at the same time I love finance and wanted to learn about mergers and shares etc. Obviously knowing how to audit and book keep is always helpful. Anyway I was wondering if anybody does a law degree after completing their finance and accounting degree. Also is there a job out there that uses both finance and law and I get to be a "lawyer" and do lawyer things lol. I want to be able to have clients and help them make money/grow/merge etc. I know after finishing accounting you have to do many ACA exams to be chartered. Are there any exams after doing law? and how long will all this take lol. Just a guy trying to find his perfect job. (I've tried GOOGLE)
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woody-wood
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Im assuming google has come up with very little and in reality you will get very little from TSR, Lets assume that you finish your degree, then train to be an accountant which takes about two years at least! This equates to five years at uni (I get you're good at maths but it emphasises my point). Now you are qualified you have to choose whether to work in the profession and get a few years of experience to shake that image of being a fresh faced NQ accountant away or ditch it all and go for law. Lets assume you go for law, you must now get the equivalent of a law degree which is the GDL which takes one year and then most likely you will do the LPC instead of the BPTC which takes another year, then you will have to do a Training contract which takes another two years. So this equates to nine years in education, all of which is assuming you do your qualifications full time. Further more you are now dual qualified but without experience in either field with what will essentially be the largest educational debt list known in the banking history (although hopefully you have found some funding for these qualifications). Let us then move on to the fact that you want a job that combines both, now it seems unlikely that you can practice as both at the same time so you will have to pick a career. In reality it means you cannot have your dream job that combines both and that one of your set of qualifications is pointless and at best an addition to your C.V that was worth far too much of your time to put on.
Consider banking law, or white collar crime in the city if you do go into law as this is about as close to the skill set you would have.
Net result regardless of what you do is that you will be thirty and working like hell for a trainees salary or none at all for the entire time...
sounds like a dream to me
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GR3YFOXXX
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#3
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(Original post by woody-wood)
Im assuming google has come up with very little and in reality you will get very little from TSR, Lets assume that you finish your degree, then train to be an accountant which takes about two years at least! This equates to five years at uni (I get you're good at maths but it emphasises my point). Now you are qualified you have to choose whether to work in the profession and get a few years of experience to shake that image of being a fresh faced NQ accountant away or ditch it all and go for law. Lets assume you go for law, you must now get the equivalent of a law degree which is the GDL which takes one year and then most likely you will do the LPC instead of the BPTC which takes another year, then you will have to do a Training contract which takes another two years. So this equates to nine years in education, all of which is assuming you do your qualifications full time. Further more you are now dual qualified but without experience in either field with what will essentially be the largest educational debt list known in the banking history (although hopefully you have found some funding for these qualifications). Let us then move on to the fact that you want a job that combines both, now it seems unlikely that you can practice as both at the same time so you will have to pick a career. In reality it means you cannot have your dream job that combines both and that one of your set of qualifications is pointless and at best an addition to your C.V that was worth far too much of your time to put on.
Consider banking law, or white collar crime in the city if you do go into law as this is about as close to the skill set you would have.
Net result regardless of what you do is that you will be thirty and working like hell for a trainees salary or none at all for the entire time...
sounds like a dream to me
I'm actually in the middle of something similar and it's not as bad as it may sound.

Here's my story;

I read Law at QUB (LL.B), did a masters in Corporate Governance (LL.M), got a job in the Big 4 in Tax, studying for the ACA (Chartered Accountant). The 3 1/2 years of professional training and exams are all paid for by my firm. I'm in the process of switching from Tax to Forensics. I plan to do the LPC and a TC afterwards, that is if I don't get sidetracked into banking!
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Enoxial
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(Original post by woody-wood)
Im assuming google has come up with very little and in reality you will get very little from TSR, Lets assume that you finish your degree, then train to be an accountant which takes about two years at least! This equates to five years at uni (I get you're good at maths but it emphasises my point). Now you are qualified you have to choose whether to work in the profession and get a few years of experience to shake that image of being a fresh faced NQ accountant away or ditch it all and go for law. Lets assume you go for law, you must now get the equivalent of a law degree which is the GDL which takes one year and then most likely you will do the LPC instead of the BPTC which takes another year, then you will have to do a Training contract which takes another two years. So this equates to nine years in education, all of which is assuming you do your qualifications full time. Further more you are now dual qualified but without experience in either field with what will essentially be the largest educational debt list known in the banking history (although hopefully you have found some funding for these qualifications). Let us then move on to the fact that you want a job that combines both, now it seems unlikely that you can practice as both at the same time so you will have to pick a career. In reality it means you cannot have your dream job that combines both and that one of your set of qualifications is pointless and at best an addition to your C.V that was worth far too much of your time to put on.
Consider banking law, or white collar crime in the city if you do go into law as this is about as close to the skill set you would have.
Net result regardless of what you do is that you will be thirty and working like hell for a trainees salary or none at all for the entire time...
sounds like a dream to me
I think the role you would get would involve more Law and less accounting(Like 95% law).
You might hear that ACCA's and ACA's are taught law in their courses but they are only taught 'Civil Law' such as Law of Contacts and Torts of Negligence (and money laundering) and not 'Criminal Law' such as murders and deaths etc.
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woody-wood
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#5
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(Original post by GR3YFOXXX)
I'm actually in the middle of something similar and it's not as bad as it may sound.

Here's my story;

I read Law at QUB (LL.B), did a masters in Corporate Governance (LL.M), got a job in the Big 4 in Tax, studying for the ACA (Chartered Accountant). The 3 1/2 years of professional training and exams are all paid for by my firm. I'm in the process of switching from Tax to Forensics. I plan to do the LPC and a TC afterwards, that is if I don't get sidetracked into banking!
you actually sound like someone who's is probably just going to end up as an accountant, i don't get the point of wanting to switch as soon as you qualify, some people here want to switch after being an accountant for a few years but thats because the job doesn't do it for them...
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GR3YFOXXX
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#6
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(Original post by woody-wood)
you actually sound like someone who's is probably just going to end up as an accountant, i don't get the point of wanting to switch as soon as you qualify, some people here want to switch after being an accountant for a few years but thats because the job doesn't do it for them...
I dunno, I still feel like I wan't to qualify as a lawyer, although I am very happy in my current job. I may end up doing the New York Bar as a hobby though and end up in banking or private equity lol. The forensics role I'm moving into does focus quite a lot on white collar crime, misappropriation of funds and litigation advisory roles.
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Brevity
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#7
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(Original post by GR3YFOXXX)
I dunno, I still feel like I wan't to qualify as a lawyer, although I am very happy in my current job. I may end up doing the New York Bar as a hobby though and end up in banking or private equity lol.
I dunno, I still feel like I wan't to win Wimbledon, although I am very happy in my current job. I may end up becoming an astronaut as a hobby though and end up winning a Nobel Prize or curing cancer lol.
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chalks
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#8
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(Original post by GR3YFOXXX)
I dunno, I still feel like I wan't to qualify as a lawyer, although I am very happy in my current job. I may end up doing the New York Bar as a hobby though and end up in banking or private equity lol. The forensics role I'm moving into does focus quite a lot on white collar crime, misappropriation of funds and litigation advisory roles.
Post of the year so far.


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Bisola123
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#9
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I'm currently going into my second year of a Law degree and I'm thinking of going into accountancy after. I'm trying to secure internships at PS firms for Summer 2014 in order to get a real idea of what I would be getting myself into. However, the feasibility of this happening seems slim to me as although I am fond of numeracy and am adequately skilled, I feel as though my Law degree would prohibit me from being able to break into the Accountancy career as I would be competing with those who have studied Accounting and other finance related topics. Thoughts?
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woody-wood
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#10
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(Original post by Bisola123)
I'm currently going into my second year of a Law degree and I'm thinking of going into accountancy after. I'm trying to secure internships at PS firms for Summer 2014 in order to get a real idea of what I would be getting myself into. However, the feasibility of this happening seems slim to me as although I am fond of numeracy and am adequately skilled, I feel as though my Law degree would prohibit me from being able to break into the Accountancy career as I would be competing with those who have studied Accounting and other finance related topics. Thoughts?
I can't give you exact numbers but a strong number of law grads go into accountancy, its a favourable and useful degree with accountancy firms. In reality just apply and I'm sure you will come up with something somewhere
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GR3YFOXXX
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#11
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(Original post by Brevity)
I dunno, I still feel like I wan't to win Wimbledon, although I am very happy in my current job. I may end up becoming an astronaut as a hobby though and end up winning a Nobel Prize or curing cancer lol.
lol
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coolguy92
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#12
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Yes, this is possible to do! I also want to do the same thing but for different reasons. It will be longer to do achieve, if you wanted to go through the ACA route as you would be forced to study this[ACA] under a training contract. However if you decided that you wanted to do a different form of accounting (under a different accounting professional body), then this is more than possible. I'll be happy to inbox you as to how you achieve what you want to do.
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AW1983
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#13
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Sorry to come into the thread late. Have you thought about the career of company secretary? I recommend you check out ICSA's website as I think this could be a great career for you.
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Berylmy
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#14
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Hey, how did your plan go? I'm actually now in the same situation as you (5 years ago)! I'm doing forensic accounting and still want to be a lawyer, but would certainly love to keep my accounting certificate even when I become a lawyer. Have you achieved what you wanted to do when you wrote this?
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Roojie
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#15
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I did BA(hons) in Accounting and Business and then did ACCA but while studying I was working in law firm for four years as a paralegal and now I wanted to be qualified Lawyer but it takes too much as i spend alot of money and time doing accounts and now switching to Law doing 1 year GDL and 1 year in LPC will be hard and costly and time consuming anyone would suggest what should I do ? I have training in law and get training contract too in law but not in accounts anyone know anyhitng about solicitor accountant ?
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