M2 need some explaining in circular motion question Watch

swagadon
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question 12
ive manage to get that the acceleration towards earth of the object on the equator was about 0.03 but,on the second part,the answer was the object at the north pole accelerates faster by 0.03, im trying to visualise this and its pretty hard to see why, can someone please explain?
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ghostwalker
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(Original post by swagadon)
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question 12
ive manage to get that the acceleration towards earth of the object on the equator was about 0.03 but,on the second part,the answer was the object at the north pole accelerates faster by 0.03, im trying to visualise this and its pretty hard to see why, can someone please explain?
At the poles, gravity is pulling the object down.

At the equator, the force of gravity is moving the object in a circular path AND pulling the object down.
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swagadon
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(Original post by ghostwalker)
At the poles, gravity is pulling the object down.

At the equator, the force of gravity is moving the object in a circular path AND pulling the object down.
i dont see why the acceleration on the equator would be slower by 0.03 tho? there is no force pushing it upwards?
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ghostwalker
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(Original post by swagadon)
i dont see why the acceleration on the equator would be slower by 0.03 tho? there is no force pushing it upwards?
At the Equator, the force required to move in a circle is 0.03m. This force comes from gravity. So what's left is available to accelerate the object downwards, i.e. the gravitational acceleration as experienced.
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swagadon
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(Original post by ghostwalker)
At the Equator, the force required to move in a circle is 0.03m. This force comes from gravity. So what's left is available to accelerate the object downwards, i.e. the gravitational acceleration as experienced.
I see! what would I ever do without you ghostwalker haha, i had a feeling youd answer my question.

Are you a teacher?
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ghostwalker
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(Original post by swagadon)
Are you a teacher?
No, just someone who enjoys maths.
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swagadon
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same, what do you do if your not a teacher?
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ghostwalker
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(Original post by swagadon)
same, what do you do if your not a teacher?
Look for a job :p:

Used to work on mainframes, assembler programming, and automation. [/personal]
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swagadon
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(Original post by ghostwalker)
Look for a job :p:

Used to work on mainframes, assembler programming, and automation. [/personal]
cool, im about to make a new question on a new thread :P
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