Measuring mass in space Watch

queenfatso
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Okay, so I've got this A2 coursework but I need help on a few things
I've got my force/extension and T2/mass graphs.
Then the prompt sheet told me to use a "calibration graph" and to use an unknown mass to test the calibration graph.

1) What is a calibration graph in this situation? What does it look like? How do I use it?

2) How would I use the unknown mass?

3) What's the gradient I get from T2/mass graph? & how do I use/link the gradient with my spring constant from force/extension?

If you can answer any of these questions, it would be major help!
Thanks.
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uberteknik
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(Original post by queenfatso)
Okay, so I've got this A2 coursework but I need help on a few things
I've got my force/extension and T2/mass graphs.
Then the prompt sheet told me to use a "calibration graph" and to use an unknown mass to test the calibration graph.

1) What is a calibration graph in this situation? What does it look like? How do I use it?

2) How would I use the unknown mass?

3) What's the gradient I get from T2/mass graph? & how do I use/link the gradient with my spring constant from force/extension?

If you can answer any of these questions, it would be major help!
Thanks.
Calibration graphs are a record of the experiment using a known (calibration) mass. The graphs are produced by successively adding multiples of the same known mass and repeating the measurements. The experiment is first executed using these masses and both force/extension and t2/MASS graphs are produced in this way.

You could use say, the same size bolts/nuts or coins if you do not have access to accurate laboratory masses. But these will need to be measured using an accurate set of scales.

Once you have the calibration graphs, the experiment is executed again with unknown masses.

You can now return to the calibration graphs and using your unknown mass results for extension and oscillation period, look up the measurement on the appropriate scale and then read off the associated force and mass.
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