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Anybody know anything about silent violins? watch

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    I'm thinking of taking up violin again after dropping it about 5 years ago. I first heard of electric violins after that quartet on Britain's Got Talent (they're amazing btw :eek:). Are electric violins and silent violins the same? How does it work, do you just plug the headphones into the violin when you practise? And can you also play them acoustically, or do they need an amp?

    If anyone can help I'd be really grateful
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    I have an electric violin personally never heard of a silent one though I'd imagine is getting at the same thing. My electric has one input and two outputs. The outputs are a normal jack lead (ie for an amplifier or PA system) and the other is a mini-jack that you can plug headphones into. With the headphones in you obviously still make a little bit of noise because the strings are still vibrating, but is a very faint scratch really, because there's no violin body to amplify it. in your headphones though, you can hear it fine.

    You have a choice really - you can have an acoustic violin with additions (such as a mic made for the bridge) meaning you can play it acoustically, you can have an acoustic-electric (like the guitar), or you can have a full electric. Only the full electric can be played silently; the others will all make sound without being plugged in; but the other side of this is that you *have* to plug an electric into something to hear it.

    The one thing I would say is that electric violins are a VERY big investment. You'll be paying thousands for one that actually sounds half decent, and the cheaper ones (generally) do really sound awful. Also, it's quite hard to get used to the new distribution of how the violin is made - you need to be good at holding the violin correctly before using electrics, because the battery pack is REALLY heavy and sits awkwardly on your shoulder. There's no equal weight distribution like in standard violins, so it's a bit tricky at first.

    Totally not trying to put you off it though, I love mine to pieces and I know it'll be useful at uni because you can practise silently in your room without paying to use music rooms or annoying your flat mates
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    (Original post by ccm.blake95)
    I have an electric violin personally never heard of a silent one though I'd imagine is getting at the same thing. My electric has one input and two outputs. The outputs are a normal jack lead (ie for an amplifier or PA system) and the other is a mini-jack that you can plug headphones into. With the headphones in you obviously still make a little bit of noise because the strings are still vibrating, but is a very faint scratch really, because there's no violin body to amplify it. in your headphones though, you can hear it fine.

    You have a choice really - you can have an acoustic violin with additions (such as a mic made for the bridge) meaning you can play it acoustically, you can have an acoustic-electric (like the guitar), or you can have a full electric. Only the full electric can be played silently; the others will all make sound without being plugged in; but the other side of this is that you *have* to plug an electric into something to hear it.

    The one thing I would say is that electric violins are a VERY big investment. You'll be paying thousands for one that actually sounds half decent, and the cheaper ones (generally) do really sound awful. Also, it's quite hard to get used to the new distribution of how the violin is made - you need to be good at holding the violin correctly before using electrics, because the battery pack is REALLY heavy and sits awkwardly on your shoulder. There's no equal weight distribution like in standard violins, so it's a bit tricky at first.

    Totally not trying to put you off it though, I love mine to pieces and I know it'll be useful at uni because you can practise silently in your room without paying to use music rooms or annoying your flat mates
    Thanks so much for your reply! I would rep you but I've run out :sad:

    I do also have an acoustic violin and so would use the electric/silent one for practising, so as not to disturb the neighbours, but then if I wanted to play in front of people I would have the choice of using either, which is pretty good!

    I'm most likely going to be buying a second-hand one, because I can't afford thousands. I've found a second-hand Yamaha on ebay for a very decent price. And yamaha is very trustworthy. I still need to do a lot of research. Mind me asking how much you paid for yours?

    Thanks again! Was half expecting nobody to answer haha, it's not a very common thing to have as far as I know.
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    Yep, sounds like a good plan don't forget to get it insured!

    I don't honestly know really because it was a present but I think it was about two and a half grand? (It was a very big present! ) Yamaha is a good brand to go with I think, they tend to do good class ones. If possible, try to find a music store that sells them and see if you could try one or two out - it's only the same as buying a normal violin, you need to be sure it feels and sounds right for you!

    That's totally fine, I'm glad to help (it's not often I get asked about this kinda stuff on TSR!)
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    If your not up for buying an electric you can practice almost silently on your acoustic violin using a proper practice mute.

    http://www.thestringzone.co.uk/heavy...-practice-mute

    I bought one for practicing without annoying my flat mates and it was the best £20 I spent

    Some small details like dynamics you obviously can't perfect with the mute but for general practice it's really good !


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    (Original post by Hellz_Bellz!)
    I'm thinking of taking up violin again after dropping it about 5 years ago. I first heard of electric violins after that quartet on Britain's Got Talent (they're amazing btw :eek:). Are electric violins and silent violins the same? How does it work, do you just plug the headphones into the violin when you practise? And can you also play them acoustically, or do they need an amp?

    If anyone can help I'd be really grateful
    NOOOO, not an electric violin!! Each to their own I suppose. I don't think there is such thing as a silent violin, however you can buy mutes that work four all four strings and dramtically reduce the sound for about £6.
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    (Original post by Lord Harold)
    NOOOO, not an electric violin!! Each to their own I suppose. I don't think there is such thing as a silent violin, however you can buy mutes that work four all four strings and dramtically reduce the sound for about £6.
    Why not an electric one? I still have my brother's old acoustic full-size violin so I'd have both of them?
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    (Original post by Hellz_Bellz!)
    Why not an electric one? I still have my brother's old acoustic full-size violin so I'd have both of them?
    I'm just a bit of a traditionist when it comes to music!
 
 
 
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