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    Hello, I want to be an engineer but my schools science department don't do A-Level Physics and not enough people picked Maths (no one is qualified to teach FM)I was wondering if their are any qualifications that are equivalent to A Level Physics but don't require loads of exams and piratical work?

    In my area the schools are all mainly vocational I am having to self teach maths and fm. My current options are Biology, Chemistry, Psychology, General Studies (Compulsory). So an other A Level on top of that would be to much.

    Year 12 I Will Have 15 exams. With A Level Physics it would be 17

    I want to do two degrees one a BSc of Science (specialising in BioChemistry) at NUI Galway and BEng Honours from the Open University. Then for post grad I want to do PhD Chemistry and MSc Physics
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    (Original post by JosephSF)
    Hello, I want to be an engineer but my schools science department don't do A-Level Physics. I was wondering if their are any qualifications that are equivalent to A Level Physics but don't require loads of exams and piratical work?
    A-level Physics and Maths are pretty much essential for an Engineering degree. There's no substitute really. You could try and do a BTEC, but you may be limiting where you can apply to for an Engineering degree, but these are much more practically-based than A-levels. The best people to ask are any universities that appeal to you.

    If it is at all possible for you to do A-level Physics, though, you absolutely should. Doing mechanics modules and/or Further Maths would help too.
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    (Original post by -G-a-v-)
    A-level Physics and Maths are pretty much essential for an Engineering degree. There's no substitute really. You could try and do a BTEC, but you may be limiting where you can apply to for an Engineering degree, but these are much more practically-based than A-levels. The best people to ask are any universities that appeal to you.

    If it is at all possible for you to do A-level Physics, though, you absolutely should. Doing mechanics modules and/or Further Maths would help too.
    Hey, Thanks. I have just updated it so if you can take a look it goes into more detail about the course i want to do and suff
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    (Original post by JosephSF)
    Hello, I want to be an engineer but my schools science department don't do A-Level Physics and not enough people picked Maths (no one is qualified to teach FM)I was wondering if their are any qualifications that are equivalent to A Level Physics but don't require loads of exams and piratical work?

    In my area the schools are all mainly vocational I am having to self teach maths and fm. My current options are Biology, Chemistry, Psychology, General Studies (Compulsory). So an other A Level on top of that would be to much.

    Year 12 I Will Have 15 exams. With A Level Physics it would be 17

    I want to do two degrees one a BSc of Science (specialising in BioChemistry) at NUI Galway and BEng Honours from the Open University. Then for post grad I want to do PhD Chemistry and MSc Physics
    Two degrees is not impossible (unless you're trying to do them at the same time!), but: you will only get funded for the first one, especially now the OU's funding system has changed so that it is closer to 'normal' unis. (I'm doing undergrad maths courses with the OU, but the only reason this is financially viable is that up until recently, OU degrees were much much cheaper than their brick and mortar counterparts and I'm still on the old system).

    It's worth nothing that you wouldn't need A-level Physics to start a BEng with the OU as they don't really have any entry requirements, their entry level modules would get you up and running with the physics (and maths) you need.

    If you want to be an engineer, you should be doing an Engineering degree not Biochemistry or a PhD in Chemistry.

    An MSc in Physics would presuppose an Undergraduate background in Physics (and Engineering alone would probably not help you here as there's a lot of Physics that Engineering wouldn't cover).

    You could look into integrated Masters MEng degrees in Engineering at brick unis (though these usually specify a particular branch of Engineering e.g. mechanical, electrical, chemical etc. (Chemical might be of interest given that you sound like you're quite into chemistry.

    Some unis will offer Engineering degrees with a 'Foundation Year' to allow you to transfer into Engineering without A-level Physics. This would add an extra year to your time at uni but if engineering is what you want to do, it's probably the best way to go about it if you can't get access to A-level Physics anywhere. I don't think any admissions tutors could mark you down for not doing A-level Physics given that it's not possible for you to take it because your school don't offer it and it's not really something you can entirely self-teach as there'd be practical work involved. Some unis will also have work placements in your third year which (as far as I know) the OU don't offer.

    You've mentioned Biochemistry, Chemistry, Physics and Engineering all in one post though, how sure are you that you want to be an 'engineer'? (It's fine if you're not sure, but if you know that you want to become an Engineer, doing an Engineering degree is the best (possibly only) way to go.
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    (Original post by -G-a-v-)
    Two degrees is not impossible (unless you're trying to do them at the same time!), but: you will only get funded for the first one, especially now the OU's funding system has changed so that it is closer to 'normal' unis. (I'm doing undergrad maths courses with the OU, but the only reason this is financially viable is that up until recently, OU degrees were much much cheaper than their brick and mortar counterparts and I'm still on the old system).

    It's worth nothing that you wouldn't need A-level Physics to start a BEng with the OU as they don't really have any entry requirements, their entry level modules would get you up and running with the physics (and maths) you need.

    If you want to be an engineer, you should be doing an Engineering degree not Biochemistry or a PhD in Chemistry.

    An MSc in Physics would presuppose an Undergraduate background in Physics (and Engineering alone would probably not help you here as there's a lot of Physics that Engineering wouldn't cover).

    You could look into integrated Masters MEng degrees in Engineering at brick unis (though these usually specify a particular branch of Engineering e.g. mechanical, electrical, chemical etc. (Chemical might be of interest given that you sound like you're quite into chemistry.

    Some unis will offer Engineering degrees with a 'Foundation Year' to allow you to transfer into Engineering without A-level Physics. This would add an extra year to your time at uni but if engineering is what you want to do, it's probably the best way to go about it if you can't get access to A-level Physics anywhere. I don't think any admissions tutors could mark you down for not doing A-level Physics given that it's not possible for you to take it because your school don't offer it and it's not really something you can entirely self-teach as there'd be practical work involved. Some unis will also have work placements in your third year which (as far as I know) the OU don't offer.

    You've mentioned Biochemistry, Chemistry, Physics and Engineering all in one post though, how sure are you that you want to be an 'engineer'? (It's fine if you're not sure, but if you know that you want to become an Engineer, doing an Engineering degree is the best (possibly only) way to go.
    Yes, I see what you are saying, the reason i want to do all that is I love all the subjects but when like chem engineering its not proper chemistry. I want to be a sort of closet engineer. I could do the the exam board marked ISA not the center marked one but i don't know. I figured out that if i was to do my BSc In Ireland it is a heck of a lot cheaper then i can get funding for my BEng. My parents said they would pay for the BSc.
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    (Original post by JosephSF)
    Yes, I see what you are saying, the reason i want to do all that is I love all the subjects but when like chem engineering its not proper chemistry. I want to be a sort of closet engineer. I could do the the exam board marked ISA not the center marked one but i don't know. I figured out that if i was to do my BSc In Ireland it is a heck of a lot cheaper then i can get funding for my BEng. My parents said they would pay for the BSc.
    I've no idea about how funding works for Irish unis. What I meant by the physics thing is that you wouldn't have the benefit of a physics teacher to help you improve at doing physics practicals.

    It's probably worth talking to your physics teachers at school to see if they could give you any help with self-teaching A-level Physics.

    If you can fund doing two degrees, then I can't see anything really stopping you - just bear in mind that you'll be studying for a long time if you do two degrees, a Masters and then a PhD. Doing all of them full time means 10 years of Uni before you complete all your qualifications. (Don't try and do the two undergrad degrees at the same time, it most likely will not end well :p: )
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    (Original post by -G-a-v-)
    I've no idea about how funding works for Irish unis. What I meant by the physics thing is that you wouldn't have the benefit of a physics teacher to help you improve at doing physics practicals.

    It's probably worth talking to your physics teachers at school to see if they could give you any help with self-teaching A-level Physics.

    If you can fund doing two degrees, then I can't see anything really stopping you - just bear in mind that you'll be studying for a long time if you do two degrees, a Masters and then a PhD. Doing all of them full time means 10 years of Uni before you complete all your qualifications. (Don't try and do the two undergrad degrees at the same time, it most likely will not end well :p: )
    The tuition fees are very low 2,500 p.a. euros, Yah i like studying ahaha. Thanks ahaha. I will go nip in school in the morning and ask
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    (Original post by JosephSF)
    I want to be a sort of closet engineer.
    What do you mean? Much of an engineering degree is Maths - do you want to do this or do you like fixing and designing things for yourself? (You can do the latter as an interest without doing a degree in engineering.)

    (Original post by JosephSF)
    I could do the the exam board marked ISA not the centre marked one but i don't know.
    This still has to be done under close supervision at the exam centre, you can't just do one and send it in.

    Overall your aspirations for your future seem quite naive - lots of learning but never using anything you learn or earning any money to support yourself. It's quite normal to be uncertain at your age of what you want to do - you need to try and choose A levels that keep your options open and you'll probably get more certain as you progress.

    If you are bright enough to be studying 5 or 6 A levels, then you sound as though you should be finding a different 6th form. Anywhere that can't support running a Maths A level class is unlikely to have brilliant A level Science classes. I would recommend thinking about an alternative school.
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    (Original post by Data)
    What do you mean? Much of an engineering degree is Maths - do you want to do this or do you like fixing and designing things for yourself? (You can do the latter as an interest without doing a degree in engineering.)

    This still has to be done under close supervision at the exam centre, you can't just do one and send it in.

    Overall your aspirations for your future seem quite naive - lots of learning but never using anything you learn or earning any money to support yourself. It's quite normal to be uncertain at your age of what you want to do - you need to try and choose A levels that keep your options open and you'll probably get more certain as you progress.

    If you are bright enough to be studying 5 or 6 A levels, then you sound as though you should be finding a different 6th form. Anywhere that can't support running a Maths A level class is unlikely to have brilliant A level Science classes. I would recommend thinking about an alternative school.
    I mean the maths bit sort of a geek in maths.

    Oh i am planning on using all of my qualifications in the future its not just like oh i think ill do this degree because i like the sound of it. The other sixth form/ colleges mostly do vocational courses and don't have good results. I am sort of a teacher pet in science and the bio and chem a level teachers are highly qualified.
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    (Original post by JosephSF)
    I mean the maths bit sort of a geek in maths.
    I'm still struggling to come to terms with a sixth from that doesn't run A level Physics, let alone Maths. How can a 6th form not do A level Maths? It must be the single most useful A level to do. I can't believe that a 6th form that doesn't offer it can be competent.
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    (Original post by Data)
    I'm still struggling to come to terms with a sixth from that doesn't run A level Physics, let alone Maths. How can a 6th form not do A level Maths? It must be the single most useful A level to do. I can't believe that a 6th form that doesn't offer it can be competent.
    Because a high proportion of students do vocational courses in science and maths and their is not a high demand for the subjects in school and they wont run them if only 3 or 4 people pick it so its rather annoying. It has very bad results.
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    (Original post by JosephSF)
    Because a high proportion of students do vocational courses in science and maths and their is not a high demand for the subjects in school and they wont run them if only 3 or 4 people pick it so its rather annoying. It has very bad results.
    isn't there another college you could go to?

    Anyway, have a good think about which degree you do first, you might be fed up with academia after just doing one.
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    (Original post by Joinedup)
    isn't there another college you could go to?

    Anyway, have a good think about which degree you do first, you might be fed up with academia after just doing one.
    Yah but it is like 3 miles away from me and i have not applied to it. Yah true i might get fed up but i love to learn and i really want to do science and engineering
 
 
 
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