Questions about CD-Rs. Watch

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AllergicToFairydust
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#1
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Hi, I need some help, I decided to enter the 21th century and transfer my music coursework (which fills a whole floppy) to a CD-R -

1. Can you use an overhead pen on a cd (not shiny side) to write what it is?

2. How do you delete the contents of a CD for example if you put something on by mistake and your teacher would see it and fail you.

3. If something on your CD is read only how do you change it so its not.

Most grateful

AMG
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What's Chico Time Precious?
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1: yes i think so

2: sometimes when you write things to a CD there is an option on the software package that enables you to either be able to delete things or not able to.

3: umm, maybe try to open it with another programme that will play it
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Hash
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1. Most permanent markers can write on a CD.

2. You can't delete off a CD-R cd, only CD-RW

3. Copy the files from your CD to PC hard drive. Right click on the file (on PC hard drive), click properties, and untick the "read only box". You can now edit and save changes to this file.


Hope that helps
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AllergicToFairydust
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Thanks Guys, I have CD-Rs so it is a case of eject cd and put in another.

more questions (sorry)

4. If I take my CD to school and open it will I be able to save back on to the CD even if the computer I'm using hasn't got a CD Writer

5. Same as 4. but if it does have a CD writer would I be able to save straight to CD

6. Can I password protect my work and how?
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byakugan_neji
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(Original post by a_musical_gal)
Thanks Guys, I have CD-Rs so it is a case of eject cd and put in another.

more questions (sorry)

4. If I take my CD to school and open it will I be able to save back on to the CD even if the computer I'm using hasn't got a CD Writer

5. Same as 4. but if it does have a CD writer would I be able to save straight to CD

6. Can I password protect my work and how?
4.Nope

5.Yes, although you might have to ask the staff first for permission. Doubt all computers would have CD-rewritesr. It would cost the school/school/uni and people would be mucking about with them.

6.I believe you can but I haven't done it myself. You might need a 3rd-party program for it.
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George-W-Duck
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(Original post by a_musical_gal)
Thanks Guys, I have CD-Rs so it is a case of eject cd and put in another.

more questions (sorry)

4. If I take my CD to school and open it will I be able to save back on to the CD even if the computer I'm using hasn't got a CD Writer

5. Same as 4. but if it does have a CD writer would I be able to save straight to CD

6. Can I password protect my work and how?
For question 5 it depends on the program you use, for the vast majority to enable you to use the cd when first creating a cd you have to 'close disc', this stops you adding anything else. In that case, you wouldnt be able to add or save any additional thing on your CD -R should you take it into college/school.
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Pollo Loco
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(Original post by Hash)
1. Most permanent markers can write on a CD.

2. You can't delete off a CD-R cd, only CD-RW

3. Copy the files from your CD to PC hard drive. Right click on the file (on PC hard drive), click properties, and untick the "read only box". You can now edit and save changes to this file.


Hope that helps
Your answer to 2 isn't strictly accurate. When you 'delete' a file from a CD-R it is still on the disk but is not accessable as its location in the directory track has been removed. Also deleting a file does not release the space the file occupied as the media is write once only.
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Jamie
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(Original post by Pollo Loco)
Your answer to 2 isn't strictly accurate. When you 'delete' a file from a CD-R it is still on the disk but is not accessable as its location in the directory track has been removed. Also deleting a file does not release the space the file occupied as the media is write once only.
No, you are wrong. AS the directory track itself is only burned once, how do you figure being able to change it
you cant, and i'm amazed that someone who even knows about the directory track would think otherwise
J
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Pollo Loco
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(Original post by foolfarian)
No, you are wrong. AS the directory track itself is only burned once, how do you figure being able to change it
you cant, and i'm amazed that someone who even knows about the directory track would think otherwise
J
OK, maybe not explained properly. You can delete files form CD-R however the space is not recoverable (i.e. you can no longer see the files but the space used is not released due to write once).

It was an assumption on my part that the directory track was changed in some way.

Perhaps you can explain how the files are made not visable?
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Jamie
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(Original post by Pollo Loco)
OK, maybe not explained properly. You can delete files form CD-R however the space is not recoverable (i.e. you can no longer see the files but the space used is not released due to write once).

It was an assumption on my part that the directory track was changed in some way.

Perhaps you can explain how the files are made not visable?
they are visible as far as i know. If you put a cd into a drive and then delete the file, you will no longer see it (on some machines) others will give you an error message saying they couldn't delete.
put that same cd into another computer, and it'll see the file. its only the computer which 'deleted it' which can't see it.
that's how i understand it anyway
J
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Pollo Loco
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Not sure about that but seem to recall deleting files and then not being visible on any PC.

Its something I'll have to try and see.
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Mr Brightside
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Who cares? A simple see if this works job would have done it. If you can't find any options to do something, it can't be done. Simple as that.
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Rich
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(Original post by foolfarian)
No, you are wrong. AS the directory track itself is only burned once, how do you figure being able to change it
you cant, and i'm amazed that someone who even knows about the directory track would think otherwise
J
Don't be so quick to slam someone like that. You can in fact 'delete', 'update' and add files to write-once CDRs. Obviously you are not really deleting or updating, but you can make it appear that you are totally transparently to the user (obviously you can never recover the space which was used by 'deleted' files).

You use what's known as a multisession disc. On a multisession data disc, each track of data is recorded in a single session which is closed after the track is recorded. When the session is closed, a session lead-out is written which allows a CD-ROM reader to recognize the session and read data from it.

When you record the first session on a disc, the names and addresses of the files recorded are written in the file system for that session. When you add more files in a subsequent session, a complete new file system is written for the new session, but it can include references to files recorded in the previous session; this is known as linked multisession. The actual files already on disc do not have to be written again in the new session; only their addresses are included in the new session's file system. These addresses can be carried forward in additional sessions, so that all files recorded in previous sessions are shown as if they were part of the latest session.

When linking data between sessions, you can virtually "overwrite" an older version of a file already recorded on disc by writing a newer version of the same file (with an identical filename and directory path) in a new session. The link to the previous version of the file is lost, but the file itself is still on disc, and you can get it back again if you need it. Files can be 'deleted' similarly.

Regards,
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Rich
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(Original post by foolfarian)
they are visible as far as i know. If you put a cd into a drive and then delete the file, you will no longer see it (on some machines) others will give you an error message saying they couldn't delete.
put that same cd into another computer, and it'll see the file. its only the computer which 'deleted it' which can't see it.
that's how i understand it anyway
J
Urr... I don't think you're right here.
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Nima
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(Original post by rahaydenuk)
Don't be so quick to slam someone like that. You can in fact 'delete', 'update' and add files to write-once CDRs. Obviously you are not really deleting or updating, but you can make it appear that you are totally transparently to the user (obviously you can never recover the space which was used by 'deleted' files).

You use what's known as a multisession disc. On a multisession data disc, each track of data is recorded in a single session which is closed after the track is recorded. When the session is closed, a session lead-out is written which allows a CD-ROM reader to recognize the session and read data from it.

When you record the first session on a disc, the names and addresses of the files recorded are written in the file system for that session. When you add more files in a subsequent session, a complete new file system is written for the new session, but it can include references to files recorded in the previous session; this is known as linked multisession. The actual files already on disc do not have to be written again in the new session; only their addresses are included in the new session's file system. These addresses can be carried forward in additional sessions, so that all files recorded in previous sessions are shown as if they were part of the latest session.

When linking data between sessions, you can virtually "overwrite" an older version of a file already recorded on disc by writing a newer version of the same file (with an identical filename and directory path) in a new session. The link to the previous version of the file is lost, but the file itself is still on disc, and you can get it back again if you need it. Files can be 'deleted' similarly.

Regards,
Raydenuk, respect!!!

Haha, irony or what - Cambridge boy gets his facts wrong and Hayden corrects him and explains it all superbly.

Cambridge admiss tutors suck!
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Nima
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(Original post by rahaydenuk)
Urr... I don't think you're right here.
Tell the cambridge admiss tutors that. They'd disagree.
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Nima
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(Original post by foolfarian)
No, you are wrong. AS the directory track itself is only burned once, how do you figure being able to change it
you cant, and i'm amazed that someone who even knows about the directory track would think otherwise
J
nope.
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Jamie
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(Original post by *reasoning*)
Raydenuk, respect!!!

Haha, irony or what - Cambridge boy gets his facts wrong and Hayden corrects him and explains it all superbly.

Cambridge admiss tutors suck!
um....k

Andway raydenuk, I think the reason we both disagree on this is probably the fact that I never use cd-r for saving documents etc, so never use them as multisession.
I'm a bit of a film clepto, and know that after a magical number the cd-r session is auto-closed.
besides, there's alot to be said for using those usb memory things instead. I actually found a 128mb one on the street a year back which has been brill for saving documents etc
J
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Nima
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(Original post by foolfarian)
um....k

Andway raydenuk, I think the reason we both disagree on this is probably the fact that I never use cd-r for saving documents etc, so never use them as multisession.
I'm a bit of a film clepto, and know that after a magical number the cd-r session is auto-closed.
besides, there's alot to be said for using those usb memory things instead. I actually found a 128mb one on the street a year back which has been brill for saving documents etc
J
Exactly, Rahaydenuk knows it all man.

This is why Cam admiss tutors suck - prejudice.
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Jamie
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(Original post by *reasoning*)
Exactly, Rahaydenuk knows it all man.

This is why Cam admiss tutors suck - prejudice.
1) I'm assuming this is the colossal pr1ck who parades under a billion and one different usernames.
2) what the hell did that reply even mean!?! What is a admiss tutor, why do they suck, and what the hell is prejudice got to do with anything?
J
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