How long does a gym session take to complete? Also, what does the session consist of? Watch

F1's Finest
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Hi guys, I'm definitely gonna be starting to get a good grip on my fitness when I start uni.

I'll be doing cardio, but on top of that, I'll be doing muscle training. My goal is to get bigger arms. I'm not looking to get ripped though.

So how long would each gym session roughly last?

I could do 30 minutes of cardio, followed up by some barbell bench presses, but the thing is that I see people on here in their blogs, talking about doing many other exercises in the same session. So what other common exercises/workouts do you do?

There seems to be such a big variety of things to do!
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nopenopenope
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(Original post by James A)
Hi guys, I'm definitely gonna be starting to get a good grip on my fitness when I start uni.

I'll be doing cardio, but on top of that, I'll be doing muscle training. My goal is to get bigger arms. I'm not looking to get ripped though.

So how long would each gym session roughly last?

I could do 30 minutes of cardio, followed up by some barbell bench presses, but the thing is that I see people on here in their blogs, talking about doing many other exercises in the same session. So what other common exercises/workouts do you do?

There seems to be such a big variety of things to do!
Do cardio after your session IMO. You're not going to be able to squat after you've been running or cycling. You are squatting, right? Squatting everyday, right?

In all seriousness though, it takes as long as it takes. I'm assuming you don't care about getting strongk and only care about looking aesthetic? If so, just do a split and eat properly.

Chest/Tris.
Back/Bis.
Legs/Shoulders.
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Luke070
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A session can take anywhere between 45 minutes up to 2 hours. It really depends on how much you feel like doing and how far you are able to push yourself. I personally take about 1½-2 hours, although, I go as hard as I can and try to push my body to past my limits. As the guy above me has suggested, if you're interested in doing cardio regularly, do it after your workouts.

My routine goes as followed:

Monday: Chest + Triceps
Tuesday: Back + Biceps
Wednesday: Day off
Thursday: Legs + Abs
Friday: Shoulders (sometimes I'll do chest with shoulders too on this day)
Saturday: Arms
Sunday: Day off
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Jon Mustard
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They last between 'quite short' and 'quite long' and you should aim for somewhere inbetween
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ZRO
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I'd go for 3x full body a week personally. 45 mins-1 and half hours usually but don't worry about time.

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F.R.A.W.A
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Well, as a pure cardio man (I use the gym to supplement my distance running) I do a 25 minute run, literally getting faster every minute till i can barely breath. Then 10 minutes rowing, then 10 minutes on the cross training thing. So it takes about 55 minutes if you include the water breaks and the odd stretch. But I do high intensity work outs in the gym, if you're going to go slow, it'll take longer.
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The_Last_Melon
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My only advice for you is to make your aims as clear as possible, stick to them, reach them and then set new ones.
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Blob2491
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Train your whole body. I made very slow progress doing my own routine but I started seeing real strength and size progress when I hopped onto a tried and tested routine. Do Stronglifts 5x5 or SS and add in some arm work at the end of your session.
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F1's Finest
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(Original post by ZRO)
I'd go for 3x full body a week personally. 45 mins-1 and half hours usually but don't worry about time.

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Hmmmm, so how many different back exercises do you do?

I've still got some belly fat to burn off, only a little though.




(Original post by F.R.A.W.A)
Well, as a pure cardio man (I use the gym to supplement my distance running) I do a 25 minute run, literally getting faster every minute till i can barely breath. Then 10 minutes rowing, then 10 minutes on the cross training thing. So it takes about 55 minutes if you include the water breaks and the odd stretch. But I do high intensity work outs in the gym, if you're going to go slow, it'll take longer.
I wanna do cardio for the first two weeks or so, then shift my focus more on lifting.

(Original post by The_Last_Melon)
My only advice for you is to make your aims as clear as possible, stick to them, reach them and then set new ones.
:yes: sir.

(Original post by Blob2491)
Train your whole body. I made very slow progress doing my own routine but I started seeing real strength and size progress when I hoped onto a tried and tested routine. Do Stronglifts 5x5 or SS and add in some arm work at the end of your session.
So, full body as in arms, chest, abs, back and legs?



The annoying thing about gym is that there's such a variety of things to do.

I need to have a look at these tried and tested routines that you were talking about.

SS seems more down my line for now, haha.
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Hellz_Bellz!
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Have you considered HIIT for cardio? You only have to do 15-20 mins of it for it to be effective. They recommend doing it like 2-3 times a week only as it can be hard on the body.
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Blob2491
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(Original post by James A)
x
Stronglifts is pretty much SS just with more volume. It's 3x a week full body sessions of squat, bench, row or cleans rotated with squat, overhead press, deadlift. At the end of the workout I squeeze in some dips and chin ups sets to hit my arms and its working well for me.
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F1's Finest
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(Original post by Hellz_Bellz!)
Have you considered HIIT for cardio? You only have to do 15-20 mins of it for it to be effective. They recommend doing it like 2-3 times a week only as it can be hard on the body.
Now, this is something I'm defo interested in. I'll do it two times a week and see how I feel. There's many HIIT routines though, which one interests you though? xd


(Original post by Blob2491)
Stronglifts is pretty much SS just with more volume. It's 3x a week full body sessions of squat, bench, row or cleans rotated with squat, overhead press, deadlift. At the end of the workout I squeeze in some dips and chin ups sets to hit my arms and its working well for me.
Sounds good.

What do you mean by row or cleans with squat?

I do remember you posting on these forums before, so how long have you started lifting for?
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tooosh
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What you need to do:
bench
row
squat
deadlift
overhead press
Some would say pullups. I'd agree.

Everything else depends on your goals and your situation now. Beginner? It won't take 10 sets on your chest to sufficiently work it; go with a basic high frequency program like stronglifts. Aesthetics? You'll want more volume, bicep+tricep work and other isolation exercises but you'll compromise on frequency. etc

Also depends but at a guess,

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Hellz_Bellz!
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(Original post by James A)
Now, this is something I'm defo interested in. I'll do it two times a week and see how I feel. There's many HIIT routines though, which one interests you though? xd
Well the good thing with it is you can do it with virtually every form of cardio. I used to do it on the treadmill as most people do. Something like walk for 2 minutes run for 1, but every time increase the speed of the running until you hit max at about 7 minutes in, then slow it down again. Or something like that. But if you don't like running then you can do it on the rowing machine, elliptical or bike You can print off HIIT training sheets on google.
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tooosh
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(Original post by Hellz_Bellz!)
Well the good thing with it is you can do it with virtually every form of cardio. I used to do it on the treadmill as most people do. Something like walk for 2 minutes run for 1, but every time increase the speed of the running until you hit max at about 7 minutes in, then slow it down again. Or something like that. But if you don't like running then you can do it on the rowing machine, elliptical or bike You can print off HIIT training sheets on google.
You can't do HIIT on a treadmill
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Hellz_Bellz!
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(Original post by tooosh)
You can't do HIIT on a treadmill
:lolwut: how can't you?
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tooosh
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(Original post by Hellz_Bellz!)
:lolwut: how can't you?
You can't run at maximum effort since the treadmill controls your speed. You could do HIIT on a dynamic treadmill (if/when they come out) which responds automagically to changes in your speed.

Right now you can do HIIT on a rowing machine, elliptical, bike, those weird hand bike things and so on but the best is running outside because the uneven terrain, hills etc make it harder. And more fun.
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Luxray
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(Original post by tooosh)
You can't do HIIT on a treadmill
what really? Im sure you can.
I used to have the treadmill set to do one minute relatively high running, then two minutes relatively low jogging speed. After each of these rounds the slope of the treadmill also increased. And it kept repeating for about 10-15 minutes. Isn't that high intensitiy interval training?
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tooosh
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(Original post by Luxray)
what really? Im sure you can.
I used to have the treadmill set to do one minute relatively high running, then two minutes relatively low jogging speed. After each of these rounds the slope of the treadmill also increased. And it kept repeating for about 10-15 minutes. Isn't that high intensitiy interval training?
No that's interval training which is still very beneficial. The difference between HIIT and interval training is that the fast part on HIIT is max effort. For intervals it's just faster than the other part (at a minimum).

You can't go all out on a treadmill since changing the speed manually would be too complicated.
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Luxray
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(Original post by tooosh)
No that's interval training which is still very beneficial. The difference between HIIT and interval training is that the fast part on HIIT is max effort. For intervals it's just faster than the other part (at a minimum).

You can't go all out on a treadmill since changing the speed manually would be too complicated.
but its not manual, I set the routine before I use the treadmill so my energy is focused on running, the treadmill swtiches speeds on its own. And when I said relatively high one minute i meant going near enough as fast as i can without potentially falling of the treadmill lol. Sorry for lack of clarity
I understand interval training in general terms is like how you described but i do feel what i was doing was HIIT. But the again you might the expert in fitness, im a rookie.
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