jazzzygirl
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Hi

I'm hoping to go to study bioveterinary science this September but due to a very unfortunate string of events I do not think I will get the grades.

I was hoping (yes I know people say its a bad idea!) to do the graduate vet medicine afterwards. I have the funding available to do it.

I was just looking on the UWE Hartpury website and seen they do a degree in equine science.
Could I do that then go on to do vet medicine as a graduate or is it only a bioveterinary science degree that would enable me to go on to do vet med.

Thanks in advance xl


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Maud C
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hey!
so one of my friend failed his prevet, so he completed a degree in equine science (in new zealand though) and he just got accepted into a vet school in hungary.

I heard it is possible to do it, but the vet studies are already quite long and youre adding to that 3yrs (for your BSc)
I also know that in some case it is possible to start the BSc and apply to a vet school even though you have not completed the BSc in equine science.

I will be doing equine science in hartpury this year!
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SuperCat007
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(Original post by jazzzygirl)
Hi

I'm hoping to go to study bioveterinary science this September but due to a very unfortunate string of events I do not think I will get the grades.

I was hoping (yes I know people say its a bad idea!) to do the graduate vet medicine afterwards. I have the funding available to do it.

I was just looking on the UWE Hartpury website and seen they do a degree in equine science.
Could I do that then go on to do vet medicine as a graduate or is it only a bioveterinary science degree that would enable me to go on to do vet med.

Thanks in advance xl


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Honestly, I'd say no. For two main reasons:

1. Doing a degree doesn't guarantee entry into vet med. It is likely that they will ask for decent A-level grades too. I know of three people who have gone onto vet med from Equine Science and all three had to do/re-do their A-levels to improve their grades despite them all having first class degrees. A-level results are more important now and no matter what you want to do as a graduate you can guarantee that you will be asked for 'X' amount of UCAS points in order to apply, whether that be a job or another degree/masters. Without decent A-level grades your options will be limited, even more so with such a specialist degree; which leads me nicely onto point no. 2...

2. Equine Science isn't a very respected degree and your options upon graduation are very, very limited. Most go onto further study because they can't get jobs. If you decide against vet med and want to work in the industry then your degree won't help you much. You'll go in as a stable hand, which you could have done without the degree. Even the feed companies prefer to hire Zoology/Biology/Biovet graduates because their education is much more rounded.

Just to clarify you don't NEED to do Biovet to apply for vet med. You can do any degree, I know of people with completely un-related degrees getting into vet med. But they all still needed good A-level results. Maybe do some research into doing Biology/Zoology if you're desperate to go to uni this year, it will give you a much better grounding for later in life and will mean the range of jobs you can apply for is much larger. Also talk to the unis because they know their entry criteria so they are the only people who could really answer a question like this.

Sorry to the above poster, I don't want to rain on your parade but I have spent getting on for 10 years researching whether to do Equine Science or not because it is one of the few degrees I could get into with my qualifications as they are. But the conclusion is always the same. If you come from a well known family/group which can employ you at the end then you do really well for yourself, if not then people tend to resent their degrees and their debt. Plus now fees are up to £9000 a year it would be sensible to not make too many rash decisions.

OP I think you have posted about this before and I think I remember you saying that you're desperate to get away because of family issues... But if you could stick it out for one year, resit your exams, get a job/some more WEx maybe you could apply to vet med straight off and not worry about extending the process. It seems like a big deal now, but in the long run it will be better rather than struggling through degree programs etc that you don't really want to do.
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Tarnia
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If you are SURE you have the funding (not just for the course itself but living expenses, work experience/EMS as part of the degree, books, materials, etc. etc) and are ok with the extra 3-4years study and the competition for getting in at the GEP level, I actually don't think the GEP is a bad route to go. Of course, I did it so I WOULD say that (granted, I'm also a foreigner). However, those are 2-3 BIG "ifs". I really do mean it when I say GEP is still quite competitive to get into. I have heard some people talk as if GEPs somehow "bought" our degree/our acceptance. That simply is not true-I know people that applied and were turned down, and/or offered a place on the 5 year stream because admissions didn't think their previous degree was 'acceptable' but the rest of their application was. I suppose that falls back on your A levels/the grades you get in your undergraduate degree/the rest of your application.

However, as to whether equine science would be considered acceptable-that I am not sure. Your best bet may be to contact the unis that offer GEP programs and ask the admissions team directly. I am not aware, offhand, of anyone in my class doing that as a prior degree but I don't know/remember what everyone did, so that doesn't mean there isn't someone! And my class is only 1 class. However they can be quite picky about prior degrees as I can't speak for other programs but at the **** Vet there was core material we weren't taught/were taught very much in brief because we were expected to know it from our prior degree. So if admissions doesn't think your prior degree will have given that, or that you haven't demonstrated that level of knowledge in your application, sorry, you're not getting a space.

I think SuperCat007 also had some good points.

Best of luck!
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tengentoppa
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Why the long face? Equine science is a degree that can lead to a stable job.
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Eevee13
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(Original post by jazzzygirl)
Hi

I'm hoping to go to study bioveterinary science this September but due to a very unfortunate string of events I do not think I will get the grades.

I was hoping (yes I know people say its a bad idea!) to do the graduate vet medicine afterwards. I have the funding available to do it.

I was just looking on the UWE Hartpury website and seen they do a degree in equine science.
Could I do that then go on to do vet medicine as a graduate or is it only a bioveterinary science degree that would enable me to go on to do vet med.

Thanks in advance xl


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Hiya, I agree with everyone, just adding my 2 cents.

With a related degree (e.g biovet, animal science) you can apply to both the 4 year accelerated graduate course (at RVC and Edinburgh) and the normal 5 year courses everywhere else. However with a non-related degree you can only apply to the 5 year courses. I am not sure whether equine science is counted as related enough, so you would need to contact RVC and Edinburgh first, but if not you can still apply to the 5 year courses at any university. Regarding A levels, different universities have different emphasis on them once you have a degree. Example, Bristol still ask for 3 B's at A level as well as a 2:1, but Liverpool seem much more lienient on grades.

Hope this helps a bit. Any questions just ask, I am a graduate starting on the 5 year vet course at Bristol this year
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miffy56
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I am an equine graduate. I even did a masters degree in it. I still had to return to college to do chemistry and biology. Luckily got to do both of them in a year, just waiting on results now. If I had A or poss B grades in them before doing equine I probably wouldnt have had to redo them but I didnt, so I had to.

If you decide after not to do vet med:

Btw, its really hard to get an equine job as there are not many going. At most, its like one nutritionist job a year, maybe something at an equine specific charity. Loads of stable jobs available but if I wanted to do that, I wouldnt have gone to uni.

With equine, you can go on to do a PGCE (teaching), especially secondary level biology, chemistry if you do an SKE (i did and then withdrew from my pgce place, and it really helped with then doing chemistry a level in a year, but to do an SKE course, you need to have been offered a PGCE place). You can probably do primary as well, I just didnt look into that.

Then there are also graduate programmes but I have no experience of those.

Basically, if I could redo my time, I would probably do animal science but I still really enjoyed my degree and it was never 100% equine, even at MSc. You still have to learn about other animals (this may be different at other unis than the one I went to).

I recommend Aberystwyth university if you want to do equine. Its the oldest equine science course in the country and the one of the most, if not the most, scientific in the country for it.

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iwannabeavetkate
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Hi

First of all a BSc Equine Science is accepted for entry on vet med courses in the UK but they ask for a 2:1 or higher, your A Levels are also used as part of the application and again they ask for 2 sciences of A/B and another A/B A Level. Graduate Entry Level vet med is a great way to go as you don't have to do the whole course but you can also apply through normal entry methods.
The universities expect a high level of experience working with all sorts of animals and therefore a good list of placements that you have completed is a must.
Another way of studying vet med is to travel abroad to Slovakia, Czech Republic or Poland where courses are 4-6 years in length. They are Doctors MRCVS vet med courses meaning you are Dr Blog Vet Med. The fees for these courses are half the current UK price but vary from 4500-7500 euro per year.
Living costs in these countries are also a third of UK costs with student accommodation costing around £200 PER MONTH and terms are shorter with longer holiday terms. Courses are all taught in English. These unis only ask for school leavers proof so 3 A Levels grade A-C to include A-C in Maths at GCSE level and for graduate entry a 2:2 or higher in a science degree (including equine, animal, zoology). There are several threads that outline all the details of these foreign uni's with UVM KOSICE being a popular choice for UK and Irish students. All of the three mentioned unis are recognized the RCVS so once graduated you can register to practice in the UK and are a fully qualified vet.
If you want to be a vet bad enough there is always a way.
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PinkElephant8
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I'm in final year at the RVC. This is my second degree. My first degree is in Equine Science. To the person who says it's 'not a respected degree' etc etc, I say bull****.

When I studied Equine science it was because I genuinely wanted it to be my future career. I specialised in behaviour, won an award for my dissertation and narrowly missed out on a First class degree. Equine science as a BSc won't take you far but neither will a bog standard Biology or Zoology degree. You always have to take it further... MSc, PhD etc. The same can be said for lots of things.

Now. Getting into Veterinary medicine. If you do a degree, whether it's English, Maths or something animal/science related, you will need to do well, 2:1 or higher. Your school grades also matter.

I didn't do great in my IGCSE's (medical reasons) but did well in my Scottish Highers. I was sure about a career in Equine science (either nutrition or behaviour) so I went straight into Uni. In second year I found out that I could get into veterinary medicine and I researched my options. From then on, that is what I worked towards.

I applied to Vet school in my final year but was unsuccessful. I asked for feedback and the University's were great, they all helped. I needed more diverse experience (I was too horsey), and more chemistry. I went to college for a year, studied Advanced Highers (Scottish system), got more work experience and re-applied. I was successful.

If Veterinary medicine is really what you want to do, choose a degree course that will enable you to apply as a graduate. I think it's just as important to choose something you WANT to study. If you are thinking of studying Equine science as a means to an end, you might regret it.
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CatD54321
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I thoroughly disagree based on my personal experience. Your 10 years of research didn’t teach you a lot. Everything depends on the equine science degree you do. I did mine with Imperial College at their Wye campus in Kent (gone now unfortunately). I’m currently employed as a full time lecturer at another third level institute and have never had any trouble a. Getting work or b. Access to further studies. My classmates are also very well employed and very few are in the equine industry - one started his work life as a QA, another went on to do a PhD in primatology and is currently self employed living in France, another is stateside with a PhD, another lectures in New Zealand and 2 are vets, and another started work for an animal feed company in their labs and i could go on. So doing an equine science course does not equate to low paid job as a stable hand or a crap degree. Do your homework look at whats available, go through the programmme breakdown year by year, and pick one with a good mix of science subjects - you want one with biochemistry, and anatomy
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Popsicle_pirate
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(Original post by jazzzygirl)
Hi

I'm hoping to go to study bioveterinary science this September but due to a very unfortunate string of events I do not think I will get the grades.

I was hoping (yes I know people say its a bad idea!) to do the graduate vet medicine afterwards. I have the funding available to do it.

I was just looking on the UWE Hartpury website and seen they do a degree in equine science.
Could I do that then go on to do vet medicine as a graduate or is it only a bioveterinary science degree that would enable me to go on to do vet med.

Thanks in advance xl


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It depends whether you are planning on applying for the 4 year graduate courses (RVC, Edinburgh and Bristol) or the 5 year 'normal' courses once you have a degree.

For the 4 year courses the degree must be considered relevant and often they don't want anything too specific so Equine Science may not be eligible but you would need to contact each of them to check and likely they would want a copy of the transcript of modules to decide. Biovet is a good choice for this route and I know at RVC (not sure about the other two) they don't look at your A-level grades when considering you for the graduate course.

If applying for a 5 year course your degree would essentially be irrelevant and so they would be looking at your A-levels, so if you don't have the grades to get onto Biovet then you would need to resit/retake these anyway to even be considered for the course.

In summary - if you don't want to re-do A-levels and are happy to take the expensive/longer grad route then I would suggest choosing a less specific degree such as Biology, Animal Science etc which is more acceptable for the grad route.
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