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    Do you have to write a dissertation for Maths final year projects? If so, how are you supposed to write 10k words about a Maths topic?
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    I did a final year project on invariant theory. I don't think mine was 10,000 words; it was 21 pages but a lot of that was taken up by the maths, which wasn't included in the word count. In answer to your question, do you know how much maths is out there? Loads. How do you think people can do PhDs on it? What you are taught at uni is only scratching the surface. I could have written 100 times what I did, if I'd had the time and the ability to digest that much more complex maths.
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    The proof of Fermat's Last Theorem is 108 pages (well, the version I have, published 1995). Of course that was hardly a final year project.
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    (Original post by Wally2)
    Do you have to write a dissertation for Maths final year projects? If so, how are you supposed to write 10k words about a Maths topic?
    Imagine studying enough to cover about 3 A-Levels every few months, then imagine doing this over three years or more. The amount of mathematics you can learn about is massive, and it's pretty easy to fill up 20-30 pages on one tiny subject, let alone all of that's been learnt over the past few years!

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    I am sure there are loads of mathematics out there just lying and waiting for you. But I cannot myself imagne what that would be, I am not studying mathematics on the university so I think that it might have a reason. I just think that is hard for a High School (whatever you call it) to like imagne what that would be.
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    I can see how it would be tough to imagine for someone who hasn't done a lot of the subject. You can have a look at this, and while you wont understand the Maths, it might give you an idea of how you can write a lot on one little area (the first two paragraphs give an outline of what the paper will attempt to do). Some papers are much, much longer!
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    If you asked a 3rd or 4th year mathematician to "Write all you know about the area of ...." and named a common topic, they'd probably not even know where to start because you'll end up learning a considerable amount in university.

    Bear in mind lecture notes for a single course can be anywhere from 50 to 200 A4 pages long, you're then supposed to 'join the dots' a lot in your head (no more spoon feeding like in A Level!) and in the cases of disseratations you're expected to read around the material, using textbooks and even published papers.

    Wrangler and I had to write essays for our 4th year and I don't know anyone who stayed around the 5,000 word 'suggested length', everyone going to abotu 7,000 words or more. One friend even had to cut it back from somewhere in the region of 12,000~15,000 because it was longer than needed. If I'd not had to revise for exams and I'd had the drive I could have probably expanded it to 4 or 5 times it's size without even having to read more material, just put back in the results I skimmed over.

    Even at university undergraduate level, where you're exposed to 100 times the number of results you are at A Level (per term I'd say!) if you take any 'interesting result' from a 3rd or 4th year course and go to the textbooks on it, you'll find that what is only 1 or 2 pages in your lecture notes has entire chapters devoted to it, sometimes entire books or series of books!

    Things like matrices seem somewhat boring at A Level and I'm sure more than a few A Level students have asked themselves "WTF is the point in these". You could write 100 books on the applications of matrices to quantum mechanics, general relativity, group theory, symmetries, and 100 other topics which were too complicated and scary for me to want to learn, and you'd still have only scratched the surface of what matrices can be involved in.

    On another forum I once read someone post "How can you do a degree in maths? Surely after A Level there's hardly any maths left to learn." Boy was he wrong. I could resit my 4th year 5 times and not make it to every lecture course they lecture, and those courses are each a tip of an enormous iceberg of material.
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    (Original post by AlphaNumeric)
    If you asked a 3rd or 4th year mathematician to "Write all you know about the area of ...." and named a common topic, they'd probably not even know where to start because you'll end up learning a considerable amount in university.

    Bear in mind lecture notes for a single course can be anywhere from 50 to 200 A4 pages long, you're then supposed to 'join the dots' a lot in your head (no more spoon feeding like in A Level!) and in the cases of disseratations you're expected to read around the material, using textbooks and even published papers.

    Wrangler and I had to write essays for our 4th year and I don't know anyone who stayed around the 5,000 word 'suggested length', everyone going to abotu 7,000 words or more. One friend even had to cut it back from somewhere in the region of 12,000~15,000 because it was longer than needed. If I'd not had to revise for exams and I'd had the drive I could have probably expanded it to 4 or 5 times it's size without even having to read more material, just put back in the results I skimmed over.

    Even at university undergraduate level, where you're exposed to 100 times the number of results you are at A Level (per term I'd say!) if you take any 'interesting result' from a 3rd or 4th year course and go to the textbooks on it, you'll find that what is only 1 or 2 pages in your lecture notes has entire chapters devoted to it, sometimes entire books or series of books!

    Things like matrices seem somewhat boring at A Level and I'm sure more than a few A Level students have asked themselves "WTF is the point in these". You could write 100 books on the applications of matrices to quantum mechanics, general relativity, group theory, symmetries, and 100 other topics which were too complicated and scary for me to want to learn, and you'd still have only scratched the surface of what matrices can be involved in.

    On another forum I once read someone post "How can you do a degree in maths? Surely after A Level there's hardly any maths left to learn." Boy was he wrong. I could resit my 4th year 5 times and not make it to every lecture course they lecture, and those courses are each a tip of an enormous iceberg of material.
    Firstly are you trying to scare people

    I have heard that if you are ok at math in the high School (still no idea what it is called) then you could complete a mathematics study, another thing is that you can like plan your study yourself, so if there is something which you do not understand you can just skip it and go for some of the other stuff that you understand hopefully.

    And concerning mathematics last year project, I am sure that there is a lot of diffrent stuff to write about, but I just have no idea of what the subjects would be, well I think I have heard about something called Eliptic Curves which I think is a mathematics subject, wheter it suitable for a project or not I have no idea of.

    And by the way all these papers I have seen so far look like they have been written in LaTeX am I right to a assume so?
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    Don't worry about not knowing the topics now, by the time you come to your fourth year you should have a pretty good idea about the type of maths you enjoy and would enjoy writing about.

    I don't think it's a requirement for them to typed up using LaTeX (given that there are alternatives, though less preferable for me, based on the small amount of maths I've typed up) but most people prefer it.
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    Could you write a final year project on the subject 'Eliptic Curves'? And do you get teached how to use LaTeX at the university?
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    Could *I* write a final-year project on Elliptic Curves? No :P

    And do students get taught how to use LaTeX? Well I wouldn't know for sure but I'm guessing you're given resources as to how to learn (free e-books, links).

    Here's the course specification for the maths degree at Imperial:
    http://www.ma.ic.ac.uk/undergraduate/UGCourses0506.pdf

    Pages 9-10 show the third/fourth modules, it doesn't explicitly say Elliptic Curves but I don't think this means you can't do them.

    Here's the course specification for the maths degree at Exeter:
    http://www.maths.ex.ac.uk/Teaching/M...3/ptopic04.pdf (pages 10-11)

    And here's another list of some projects which have been done:
    http://math.usm.my/und%20projects.htm

    What is it you like about elliptic curves, or is it just a random topic you've heard?

    I wouldn't worry about these things much yet, by the time you're up to your fourth year you should have a pretty good idea what you want to study.
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    Most definitely you can write an essay on elliptic curves. Here is the list of essay topics Wrangler and I had to pick a topic from to write about (though you can suggest your own if it's of sufficent depth). Essay topic 20 is about elliptic curves, and 11 is about hyperelliptic curves.

    Can't seem to find the one Wrangler did (did you suggest it?). I did 58.
    (Original post by lo2)
    another thing is that you can like plan your study yourself, so if there is something which you do not understand you can just skip it and go for some of the other stuff that you understand hopefully.
    You attend lecture courses you are interested in, so if you like say modular forms, you can go to a course on that and not bother with something quite different like quantum field theory (sorry, I'm using 3rd or 4th year courses as examples just because they are fresh in my mind). You can't really skip parts within a lecture course without the worry that it'll come up in the exams and you've ignored that section, not to mention that most courses build upon themselves so missing bits out causes problems later.

    You're forced to take certain courses in your first and the range of choice is usually narrow in the second year but by 3rd and 4th year you've complete freedom to pick your courses.

    Latex is pretty much the "Microsoft Word for Mathematicians". Some unis might give quick classes in how to do it, but it's much like learning computer code, you pick the basics up quite quickly and then slowly learn to make it look extra fancy. Latex is very intuitive too. For instance, if you want any of the greek alphabet symbols you just do "\symbolname", such as \alpha is \alpha or \gamma is \gamma. If you want capital letters you just capitalise the symbol's first letter, so \Gamma is \Gamma. Eventually tex code becomes very readable to you and quick to type.
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    (Original post by AlphaNumeric)
    Most definitely you can write an essay on elliptic curves. Here is the list of essay topics Wrangler and I had to pick a topic from to write about (though you can suggest your own if it's of sufficent depth). Essay topic 20 is about elliptic curves, and 11 is about hyperelliptic curves.

    Can't seem to find the one Wrangler did (did you suggest it?). I did 58.
    You attend lecture courses you are interested in, so if you like say modular forms, you can go to a course on that and not bother with something quite different like quantum field theory (sorry, I'm using 3rd or 4th year courses as examples just because they are fresh in my mind). You can't really skip parts within a lecture course without the worry that it'll come up in the exams and you've ignored that section, not to mention that most courses build upon themselves so missing bits out causes problems later.

    You're forced to take certain courses in your first and the range of choice is usually narrow in the second year but by 3rd and 4th year you've complete freedom to pick your courses.

    Latex is pretty much the "Microsoft Word for Mathematicians". Some unis might give quick classes in how to do it, but it's much like learning computer code, you pick the basics up quite quickly and then slowly learn to make it look extra fancy. Latex is very intuitive too. For instance, if you want any of the greek alphabet symbols you just do "\symbolname", such as \alpha is \alpha or \gamma is \gamma. If you want capital letters you just capitalise the symbol's first letter, so \Gamma is \Gamma. Eventually tex code becomes very readable to you and quick to type.
    Ok thank you very much for your superb answer.

    And I am currently using LaTeX, started some months ago so I kind of know the basic.
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    How come those reports can be found on the internet?
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    Which reports are you referring to?
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    (Original post by AlphaNumeric)
    Which reports are you referring to?
    You have just shown me a list of subject for the last year project. Furthermore I have been shown some notes concerning, some of the first mathematics stuff you learn at the university and you have shown me some notes concerning quantum mechanichs. That is what I am refering to as, you have all linked to them which mean that they must be somwhere on the internet.

    By the way do you know any good mathematics site, for a college boy, that you could use to improve your grades and I am not talking solutions to problems or any cheat just some stuff that is a bit extrodinary and which could impress the teacher.
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    A lot of unis put notes to lecture courses online, or students type them up and then put them online themselves (I've done that). The list of essay topics is online because our maths department puts most of it's information and things like example sheets and past exam papers online so they are easy to get.

    By 'college boy' what age do you mean?
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    (Original post by AlphaNumeric)
    A lot of unis put notes to lecture courses online, or students type them up and then put them online themselves (I've done that). The list of essay topics is online because our maths department puts most of it's information and things like example sheets and past exam papers online so they are easy to get.

    By 'college boy' what age do you mean?
    Ok so it should be a possible to find mathematics stuff on the internet.

    And by College boy, I mean from 16-19 years, I am 18 years. And I am learning mathematics. I have no idea what school you attend to at this age, in England is called. I hope you understand.
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    (Original post by lo2)
    ...just some stuff that is a bit extrodinary and which could impress the teacher.
    I suspect you'll impress them much more by getting to grips with the stuff you're meant to be studying.
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    (Original post by Wrangler)
    I suspect you'll impress them much more by getting to grips with the stuff you're meant to be studying.
    Ok...and why did you have to write that, it is plain *******s!
 
 
 
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