What do I need to do in order to become a psychologist or a psychiatrist?

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whisperingtears
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Thank you!
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Jackal The
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Well, firstly if you want to become a psychiatrist you'd need a medicine degree, which takes five years. You'd need four solid science subjects to do that, with a ton of work experience, fantastic GCSE's, and to get at least AAA or so. Wouldn't recommend it, personally.

Otherwise, if you want to go with clinical psychology (which is what it sounds more like) then you'll need to take a psychology degree first, as I'm sure you've worked out. It's not hugely important which university you go to for this, so long as it's BP accredited. You'll want to take one science-y related subject at least, whether that be psychology or biology, or a 'solid' subject that maybe involves essay writing, such as Philosophy or English Literature. A lot of your degree is based on statistics, so having a good (C+) GCSE Maths grade is essential, but don't worry about it too much - I'm useless with that sort of thing and managed to get a 1st with some hard work.

Hope that helps.
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whisperingtears
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(Original post by Jackal The)
Well, firstly if you want to become a psychiatrist you'd need a medicine degree, which takes five years. You'd need four solid science subjects to do that, with a ton of work experience, fantastic GCSE's, and to get at least AAA or so. Wouldn't recommend it, personally.

Otherwise, if you want to go with clinical psychology (which is what it sounds more like) then you'll need to take a psychology degree first, as I'm sure you've worked out. It's not hugely important which university you go to for this, so long as it's BP accredited. You'll want to take one science-y related subject at least, whether that be psychology or biology, or a 'solid' subject that maybe involves essay writing, such as Philosophy or English Literature. A lot of your degree is based on statistics, so having a good (C+) GCSE Maths grade is essential, but don't worry about it too much - I'm useless with that sort of thing and managed to get a 1st with some hard work.

Hope that helps.
Ah that helps me so much! Thank you! Do you think clinical psychology is a good job for a future career to take on? I'm really interested in it.


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516359
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(Original post by whisperingtears)
I'm going into my first hear of college are they any recommendations as to what subjects I should take to help me become the person I want to be? It's my dream job, there are so many reasons as to why I would absolutely love that job, I'm determined even though I'm not a genius,i'm just a normal person aspiring to have a future career that I enjoy (not going into detail about this) I just wanted to what sort of path I would need to take? After A levels, what do I need to do to become a psychologist?

Thank you.


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Psycologist or Psychiatrists? They're different which is why I ask. My mum's a Psychiatrist so I know the difference. Psycologists have a psycology doctorate whereas psychiatrists have medical doctorate and have chosen to specialise in the brain. Both use the same techniques but with Psychiatry there's a greater use of medical technology for diagnosis such as CT scans and MRI's and of course Psychiatrists can prescribe medication.

For both I'd recommend psychology as some theories relate to certain therapies and give you a better understanding. Biology because it may require you to learn about the brain in some way or form: I knew about Parkinson's treatments that came up in my exam because my mum talks to me about her work. The last 2 depend on what you want to become. For medicine you need 2 sciences with one being chem so you would have to do chemistry. If you want to be a Psycologist then I would recommend a social science to help with your understanding of how the mind works in different setting like anthropology, sociology or philosophy.

There are other routes into psyciatry - my mum did an access course into medicine and it was a special one because it was for those who had psycology degrees. These programs are still around but highly competitive and there are fewer places now than when she was in uni.

If you need any more info on psyciatry just ask
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whisperingtears
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(Original post by randomd_love)
Physcologist or Psychiatrists? They're different which is why I ask. My mum's a Psychiatrists so I know the difference. Physcologists have a physcology doctorate whereas physiatrists have medical doctorate and have chosen to specialise in the brain. Both use the same techniques but with Psychiatry there's a greater use of medical technology for diagnosis such as CT scans and MRI's and of course Psychiatrists can prescribe medication.

For both I'd recommend physcology as some theories relate to certain therapies and give you a better understanding. Biology because it may require you to learn about the brain in some way or form: I knew about Parkinson's treatments that came up in my exam because my mum talks to me about her work. The last 2 depend on what you want to become. For medicine you need 2 sciences with one being chem so you would have to do chemistry. If you want to be a Physcologist then I would recommend a social science to help with your understanding of how the mind works in different setting like anthropology, sociology or philosophy.

There are other routes into physciatry - my mum did an access course into medicine and it was a special one because it was for those who had physcology degrees. These programs are still around but highly competitive and there are fewer places now than when she was in uni.

If you need any more info on physciatry just ask
This helped me a lot! thank you so much. With being a psychologist, I want to be one that just focuses on problems like anxiety, depression, OCD and any other mental type of problem/disorder. Is there a name for this or does being a psychologist cover this anyway? Thank you.


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Jackal The
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(Original post by whisperingtears)
Ah that helps me so much! Thank you! Do you think clinical psychology is a good job for a future career to take on? I'm really interested in it.


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I think it's fantastic... probably because I want to become one as well. It's very competitive though, unfortunately, and you'll need to have built up a fair bit of relevant experience before applying. In regards to your other post, a clinical psychologist will primarily focus on things like depression/anxiety, OCD, addictions (from drugs to eating, or anorexia/bulimia), and such.
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516359
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(Original post by whisperingtears)
This helped me a lot! thank you so much. With being a psychologist, I want to be one that just focuses on problems like anxiety, depression, OCD and any other mental type of problem/disorder. Is there a name for this or does being a psychologist cover this anyway? Thank you.


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Kind of. You most likely wont see the kind of patients my mum sees because they need medication as well as treatment but yes you will be able to deal with the mental illnesses you just mentioned. The emphasis will be on therapeutic treatment more than anything else. I think this is a clinical Psychologist because of the minds of patients you'll be dealing with. If you mean long term treatment then I think you mean a counselling Psychologist.

Here's some links to help:
http://www.nhscareers.nhs.uk/explore...-psychologist/

http://www.nhscareers.nhs.uk/explore...-psychologist/

Go through the website and it will take you through all the roles of a Pyscologist. Hope I helped.
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Vian
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(Original post by Jackal The)
You'd need four solid science subjects to do that, with a ton of work experience, fantastic GCSE's, and to get at least AAA or so.

The rest of what you said is true. However, for the vast majority of medical schools, only Biology and Chemistry are required. Also, if you apply intelligently and play to your strengths, you don't even need a fantastic set of GCSEs (although it obviously helps).
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Jackal The
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(Original post by Vian)
The rest of what you said is true. However, for the vast majority of medical schools, only Biology and Chemistry are required. Also, if you apply intelligently and play to your strengths, you don't even need a fantastic set of GCSEs (although it obviously helps).
Ah, my mistake. Should probably have looked that up before responding.
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whisperingtears
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(Original post by Vian)
The rest of what you said is true. However, for the vast majority of medical schools, only Biology and Chemistry are required. Also, if you apply intelligently and play to your strengths, you don't even need a fantastic set of GCSEs (although it obviously helps).
Haha that takes some pressure off.


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whisperingtears
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(Original post by randomd_love)
Kind of. You most likely wont see the kind of patients my mum sees because they need medication as well as treatment but yes you will be able to deal with the mental illnesses you just mentioned. The emphasis will be on therapeutic treatment more than anything else. I think this is a clinical Psychologist because of the minds of patients you'll be dealing with. If you mean long term treatment then I think you mean a counselling Psychologist.

Here's some links to help:
http://www.nhscareers.nhs.uk/explore...-psychologist/

http://www.nhscareers.nhs.uk/explore...-psychologist/

Go through the website and it will take you through all the roles of a Pyscologist. Hope I helped.
Thank you I'll check those links out


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gustavus
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Or a counselling psychologist would also work in adult mental health.
More recently, psychologists are much less likely to see people with 'straightforward' mental health issues. These are often seen by IAPT workers who are graduates trained I cognitive behavioural therapy. . Increasingly psychs are only involved with people who have more complex mental health presentations
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PrimaryT
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(Original post by whisperingtears)
This helped me a lot! thank you so much. With being a psychologist, I want to be one that just focuses on problems like anxiety, depression, OCD and any other mental type of problem/disorder. Is there a name for this or does being a psychologist cover this anyway? Thank you.


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Have you thought about Psychotherapy? because everything you have listed in your interests is covered by a CBT therapist and this is incredibly easier to get onto, I have a degree in Working with Children and Young People and have gotten an unconditional offer on a Masters in CBT! based on that and my Special needs experience in schools. you can work as a Cognitive Behavioural Psychotherapist in the NHS on a band 7 salary!! with a post graduate Diploma in CBT which takes only a year to complete after your regular degree so I would recommend you look into this rather than psychology/Psychiatry. hope that helps and let me know how you get on.. I'm starting my Pg Dip in CBT in September but still so torn over this or teaching so would be great to chat to others in the Psyc field xx
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