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    (Original post by Gammon)
    Hi everyone, i'm a GCSE student currently studying OCR double award science. I've applied to do chemistry AS level (as well as biology, maths, f maths and french).
    Out of all the sciences I find chemistry the easiest (although I didn't at the start of the course) and can understand how everything interelates. It is enjoyable. With Biology I find it fact learning and as for physics that's one thing I parrot learn with no understanding but I guess that's ok as i'm not planning to take it next year.
    However everyones attitude on here is starting to worry me. Chemistry is constantly labelled here as being hard and notoriously difficult. May I ask any A level chemists why is this? Is it the amount of it? Or is it the difficulty in understanding the subject? Is it the exam papers? Or is it anything else?
    I'm starting to feel a bit put off this subject??
    i'm an a-level chemistry student...
    in my case it's the stupid exam board (OCR), and partially the stuff we get taught...
    i'm not good with facts, so there's another point...
    also, the past papers have rubbish mark schemes such as 'appropriate diagram drawn' and 'correct peak labelled' as points for marking...
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    I'm new here but I'm going to chuck in my thoughts...

    I think a lot of it also depends on what exam board you do. We do WJEC in our school and it's notoriously hard compared to a lot of others. So some boards are more learning based, while others are more fact based... and stuff.

    I think it also depends *how* you learn. I have a friend, who kicks arse at Biology and is great at that, but just CAN NOT do Chemistry or Maths. Whereas I am the complete opposite. I think you either learn sheets and sheets of notes and take it in, or you learn more factual things like Chem and Maths.

    Basically, I think it takes a lot of factors to whether you find a subject hard or not.

    If you like and enjoy it, go for it!
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    Chemistry is hard if: You don't revise, You don't turn up to lessons, You turn up to lessons under the influence of alcohol, You turn up lessons and sleep etc
    Yeah I did chemistry AS and failed due to the above, but also, in the first year, you have 3 modules. The core module is easy, but the organic chemistry module, is easy, but there is just heaps and heaps of information to learn. Rates and change, is supposidly easy, but considering I didn't know any of it..
    Yeah I regret crashing and burning in chemistry, the E looks bad on my certificate!
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    I can't let this Chemistry-bashing fest go on for much longer...
    It is unfair to say that there is a lot to memorise - try taking a language at A-level, learning all of the vocab, and all of the different tenses, all of the grammar...
    It is also unfair to say that there is a huge amount to understand. Physics and maths are subjects where understanding is more important - there are some very strange concepts in Physics that take a lot to get your head around.

    Chemistry is, in my opinion, a pretty well balanced A-level. Once you've memorised some basic rules and examples, you can extrapolate the knowledge you have and apply it to many new situations. Once you understand the the chemistry of period 3 elements and how they change as you go across the period, it is easy to apply that to those of period 4, for example.

    That's my little speech finished, and my subject defended...
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    (Original post by cpchem)
    I can't let this Chemistry-bashing fest go on for much longer...
    It is unfair to say that there is a lot to memorise - try taking a language at A-level, learning all of the vocab, and all of the different tenses, all of the grammar...
    It is also unfair to say that there is a huge amount to understand. Physics and maths are subjects where understanding is more important - there are some very strange concepts in Physics that take a lot to get your head around.

    Chemistry is, in my opinion, a pretty well balanced A-level. Once you've memorised some basic rules and examples, you can extrapolate the knowledge you have and apply it to many new situations. Once you understand the the chemistry of period 3 elements and how they change as you go across the period, it is easy to apply that to those of period 4, for example.

    That's my little speech finished, and my subject defended...
    wahey!! i love chemistry (apart from practicals)
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    Chemistry is my fave subject, hence me planning to do it at uni.

    I do like the practicals, however I'm VERY clumsy and end up messing up a lot!

    Someone said it was a male orientated subject, I guess I agree. There's 8 lads in our class (or rather there was, we've left now!) and only two girls. A lot of girls dropped out at AS.
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    i found chemistry to be the easiest from my AS choices in terms of work...

    in terms of science its gotta be one of the easiest.... physics is soooo hard compared to it!
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    (Original post by catherine2772)
    Yeh same!! I think its so unfair that we had do basically do about 5 investigations in one for just one coursework (mine was 120 pages or something, though about 80 of them were calculations...)!!!
    seriously 120 pages or is that an exaggeration?...no one at my school did anywhere near that much average 50 pages and 3 people got full marks.
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    Chemistry is not hard, it just the exams are bit funny sometimes. In chemistry there are so many reactions that you have to learn, but they never ever give you exact same reaction, they will give you various of it. So you understand the concepts of what goes on in the reaction to test your knowledge.

    Also 100% specific if your not, then time to stress!?. Cause i put time alternative for a structure but it was acutually meant to say alternating. Silly marks like that can build up and drop your grade big time.

    It all about consisten. They 3 steps are:

    1: Lean the theory
    2: understand the theory
    3: do all the past paers you can get your hands on then you be OK
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    Chemistry is not hard, it just the exams are bit funny sometimes. In chemistry there are so many reactions that you have to learn, but they never ever give you exact same reaction, they will give you variation of it. So you understand the concepts of what goes on in the reaction to test your knowledge.

    Also you have to 100% specific if your not, then time to stress!?. Cause i put time alternative for a structure but it was acutually meant to say alternating. Silly marks like that can build up and drop your grade big time.

    It all about being consistant. The 3 steps are:

    1: Learn the theory
    2: understand the theory
    3: do all the past paers you can get your hands on then you be OK
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    If you are someone who learns by understanding as opposed to parrot-fashion cramming, chemistry is quite abstract and difficult to relate to as opposed to physics which is all about say forces and on a much larger scale. Plus physics is mostly summed up mathematically so if you enjoy math you'll enjoy physics. Ive found chemistry to be rather inconsistent and ambiguous at times - no offense to chemists, I think its because its requires a deeper level of understanding which you get at uni. Well thats from personal experience anyway.
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    Half the problem is that somethings can't be explained properly at A-level until you have a university level understanding....
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    they over simiplify and then later turn round and say oh that was wrong this is true. esp true for GCSE to Alevel e.g. electron shells 8 in each shell at GCSE and then at Alevel you've got your sub shells and learn that the more shells you have the more electrons in each shell. wonder if its like that at degree?
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    (Original post by alispam)
    they over simiplify and then later turn round and say oh that was wrong this is true. esp true for GCSE to Alevel e.g. electron shells 8 in each shell at GCSE and then at Alevel you've got your sub shells and learn that the more shells you have the more electrons in each shell. wonder if its like that at degree?
    Lies are sometimes good. Check the following link to understand what I mean:

    http://over-the-rain-bow.blogspot.co...d-science.html
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    Personally, i found that chemistry at GCSE was a lot harder than it was at A-level, however, i suppose it comes down to teaching methods (as my old chemistry teacher was s***.

    There is a fair bit of fact learning involved and you do have to know quite a lot of reaction mechanisms involved. However, in organic chemsitry topics, its quite easy as you only need to learn the patterns involved.

    I agree with what some people say. Of course you have to enjoy the subject to do well in it and you're not going to succeed by missing lessons. But, from my experience, it comes down to the course and the teacher teaching.

    The teacher i've currently got (Mrs Walker...what a teacher!) is brilliant at teaching it and amkes it so easy to understand. And the Edexcel nuffield course is really good too, as you have to do the practicals to find out the answers for some stuff.

    I'm sure if you enjoyed it at GSCE, you'll be alrite.
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    Yup, good old Nuffield...
    I've got to say though, some of the other A-level Chemistry courses look a little bit, well, pathetic. The standard OCR (not Salters) and Edexcel courses don't even cover entropy... how can you do an A-level in Chemistry and not be taught about something that is absolutely fundamental to the subject?
    But then again, all of the A-levels seem to lack something important... Nuffield doesn't do any mechanisms - apart from a quick bit of SN1 and SN2.
    It's a crazy world.
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    (Original post by cpchem)
    Yup, good old Nuffield...
    I've got to say though, some of the other A-level Chemistry courses look a little bit, well, pathetic. The standard OCR (not Salters) and Edexcel courses don't even cover entropy... how can you do an A-level in Chemistry and not be taught about something that is absolutely fundamental to the subject?
    But then again, all of the A-levels seem to lack something important... Nuffield doesn't do any mechanisms - apart from a quick bit of SN1 and SN2.
    It's a crazy world.
    To be fair though, it would be impossible to cover every aspect of chemistry at A level, so exam boards have to make a decision about what not to include - whatever they choose, there will always be people complaining because they think that's the most important bit!
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    At a-level you aren't doing real chemistry, at degree level it becomes mostly all maths (apart from organic).
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    (Original post by Gammon)
    Hi everyone, i'm a GCSE student currently studying OCR double award science. I've applied to do chemistry AS level (as well as biology, maths, f maths and french).
    Out of all the sciences I find chemistry the easiest (although I didn't at the start of the course) and can understand how everything interelates. It is enjoyable. With Biology I find it fact learning and as for physics that's one thing I parrot learn with no understanding but I guess that's ok as i'm not planning to take it next year.
    However everyones attitude on here is starting to worry me. Chemistry is constantly labelled here as being hard and notoriously difficult. May I ask any A level chemists why is this? Is it the amount of it? Or is it the difficulty in understanding the subject? Is it the exam papers? Or is it anything else?
    I'm starting to feel a bit put off this subject??
    It all depends on the board I don't know about the others I only did OCR but they can be mean like that CRS exam curse them!!! I wouldn't say it was hard but it depends on you if you are someone that like facts (as in biology) or likes equations and the maths side to it (as in chemistry). At first I hated chemistry because of the moles questions (AS) as I don't do maths and that left my mind soon after GCSE. But once you use the exam papers and work out where you go wrong you get the grade. AS is easier then A2 so if you don't like AS really don't do A2.
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    (Original post by the_0ne)
    To be honest, i find Physics more difficult than chemistry, but this could because i really like chemistry, I think if you really like a subject then you will stick at it and perhaps put more work into it. I found chemistry quite hard at the start of AS but it's like everything clicked after a few months and it made it easier. If you have just come from GCSE it is a big step up but don't be put off by everybody else classing it as the hardest A-level because i think all A-levels are too the same standard anyway.
    Yeah physics is hard thats why I dropped it ASAP vectors god they were annoying never worked it out...
 
 
 
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