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    When you look at diagram the of a simply supported beam, one of the supports is fixed, while the other allows longitudinal motion (roller support). I would've thought that this was just a preference in the book, but everywhere in the web and other books, the other beam is always a roller support. See attached image.

    Why is that the case? My guess is that it is there to not cause restricted longitudinal strain stresses which will cause extra forces to be included in calculations.

    Name:  ImageUploadedByStudent Room1376483108.325337.jpg
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    (Original post by Alpha-Omega)
    When you look at diagram the of a simply supported beam, one of the supports is fixed, while the other allows longitudinal motion (roller support). I would've thought that this was just a preference in the book, but everywhere in the web and other books, the other beam is always a roller support. See attached image.

    Why is that the case? My guess is that it is there to not cause restricted longitudinal strain stresses which will cause extra forces to be included in calculations.

    Name:  ImageUploadedByStudent Room1376483108.325337.jpg
Views: 477
Size:  67.2 KB


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    A lot more simple than you think. Roller supports are commonly located at one end of long bridges. This allows the bridge structure to expand and contract with temperature changes. The expansion forces could fracture the supports at the banks if the bridge structure was "locked" in place. Roller supports can also take the form of rubber bearings, rockers, or a set of gears which are designed to allow a limited amount of lateral movement. A roller support cannot provide resistance to a lateral forces. Imagine a structure (perhaps a person) on roller skates. It would remain in place as long as the structure must only support itself and perhaps a perfectly vertical load. As soon as a lateral load of any kind pushes on the structure it will roll away in reponse to the force. The lateral load could be a shove, a gust of wind or an earthquake. Since most structures are subjected to lateral loads it follows that a building must have other types of support in addition to roller supports.

    A pinned support can resist both vertical and horizontal forces but not a moment. They will allow the structural member to rotate, but not to translate in any direction. Many connections are assumed to be pinned connections even though they might resist a small amount of moment in reality. It is also true that a pinned connection could allow rotation in only one direction; providing resistance to rotation in any other direction. The knee can be idealized as a connection which allows rotation in only one direction and provides resistance to lateral movement. The design of a pinned connection is a good example of the idealization of the reality. A single pinned connection is usually not sufficient to make a structure stable. Another support must be provided at some point to prevent rotation of the structure. The representation of a pinned support includes both horizontal and vertical forces.

    See below for the pictorial representation of said connection types:
    Name:  1_lecture13_pic1.gif
Views: 431
Size:  2.5 KB
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    (Original post by halpme)
    A lot more simple than you think. Roller supports are commonly located at one end of long bridges. This allows the bridge structure to expand and contract with temperature changes. The expansion forces could fracture the supports at the banks if the bridge structure was "locked" in place. Roller supports can also take the form of rubber bearings, rockers, or a set of gears which are designed to allow a limited amount of lateral movement. A roller support cannot provide resistance to a lateral forces. Imagine a structure (perhaps a person) on roller skates. It would remain in place as long as the structure must only support itself and perhaps a perfectly vertical load. As soon as a lateral load of any kind pushes on the structure it will roll away in reponse to the force. The lateral load could be a shove, a gust of wind or an earthquake. Since most structures are subjected to lateral loads it follows that a building must have other types of support in addition to roller supports.

    A pinned support can resist both vertical and horizontal forces but not a moment. They will allow the structural member to rotate, but not to translate in any direction. Many connections are assumed to be pinned connections even though they might resist a small amount of moment in reality. It is also true that a pinned connection could allow rotation in only one direction; providing resistance to rotation in any other direction. The knee can be idealized as a connection which allows rotation in only one direction and provides resistance to lateral movement. The design of a pinned connection is a good example of the idealization of the reality. A single pinned connection is usually not sufficient to make a structure stable. Another support must be provided at some point to prevent rotation of the structure. The representation of a pinned support includes both horizontal and vertical forces.

    See below for the pictorial representation of said connection types:
    Name:  1_lecture13_pic1.gif
Views: 431
Size:  2.5 KB
    Nice explanation. Cheers


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