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    Hi, I think I want to go down the psychologist route but I want to know if a straight psychology degree would be better than a joint honours psychology with sociology course?
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    Straight psychology is seen as more academic and will be a bit easier (still bloody hard) to get onto a PhD program for clin psych.
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    Even if it is BPS accredited?
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    Think depends on what /where you study and your ultimate goal.

    If you 100 per cent aimed at clinical it is POSSIBLE but probably more difficult to get a place with joint honours on the Doctorate- and it MUST give you GBR.

    Also you would need to think how the second subject may have some relevance to clinical eg maths would be very transferable to the research elements.

    However you won't know the individual selectors/universities may view this... You also can't easily predict what the situation may be in several years time when it comes to applying!

    If you are unsure about career - would follow your passions!

    Also if you do decide on major/minor split do find out how well this works in practice at your university - sometimes you end up with continual timetable/exam clashes. Also some academics perceive you as less serious if you are only taking bit of 'their' degree and therefore less inclined to be helpful.

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    If you know 100% you want to go on to do psychology as a career I'd just go for the straight honours. Seems simpler.

    If you really want to try a joint honours, you must must must make sure it is BPS accredited. As long as it is BPS accredited, you shouldn't be any more disadvantaged than anyone else in theory as long as it's not a really random and unrelated subject. Perhaps it should be somehow linked to clinical psychology/psychology, even if in a minor way e.g. criminology, pathology, biology, sociology, social policy (I don't know just not something like History).

    Edit: didn't read properly. Just saw you said with sociology. Yes that should be absolutely fine as long as it is BPS accredited. If I had to choose, I think obviously the straight psychology would be simpler to get into what you want to do, but doing a joint honours can have other benefits too and I'm sure there's not much in it.
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    To reiterate my earlier point-if you do decide to do two subjects, I would contact your preferred univeristies/online forums to see how these work in practice - so you don't kick yourself later. Are there timetable /exam clashes? What proportion of the students on the course are doing two subjects? On my undergraduate only about 12 out of almost 200 were doing psychology with something else (psy/law, psy/criminology, psy/social policy, psych/sociol) - and even smaller number doing psy/soc combination, about 5 people! So less than 3 per cent of the year. They weren't very visible-tutors didn't really take their problems seriously as there were so few of them. They weren't willing to rearrange stuff so they had rubbish exam clashes (as in 3 x 3 hour exams in one day), inconvenient timetable clashes - with seminars for one subject clashing with the other course. Neither school would feel responsibility for them - even for the peep who majored in psych.

    Have you worked out what exactly you like about sociology? Am wondering as some of the psych modules would fulfil this - social psych etc

    If you really are committed to a doctorate - the best preparation would be single honours as this will give you the depth /breadth

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    Well Im starting aston university soon and my course is definately BPS accredited. I don't have my timetable or anything but I get a personal tutor and a psychology tutor I think so I don't think the tutor thing should be a problem should it?I don't know if the sociology will help my career even if its as a different kind of psychologist?
    I enjoy the modules in sociology such as education and the family and learning why we have norms and values and the history of them etc. I don't enjoy the modules such as religion..


    But even if I start my joint honours and do something after university to do with psychology should that improve my chances? Pla I get a placement year I'd still be able to do that in clinical psychology?


    Thankyou for replying!
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    I would suggest you look into clinical psychology a lot further before deciding you want to actually do it as a job.

    The fact you are unsure as to whether it would be better to do sociology and psychology or just psychology seems to ring alarm bells to me as to whether you've actually looked into what it takes to be a clinical psych.

    Let me run you through what generally it takes (it is different in different cases but most clinical psychs will have to do this).
    -Getting a high 2:1 or a first in your degree
    -Often gain a masters as well but not always
    -Do a large quantity of voluntary work before you apply for any form of professional work.
    -Doing around a years work experience as an assistant psych (unpaid) which incidentally is hard to come by (can have up to 100 applicants just for one unpaid position)
    -Then move on to doing around a years paid work as an assistant psychologist
    -Then you apply for a doctorate in clinical psychology, which has a 75% rejection rate.
    -Then do three years training as a clinical psychologist (which you get paid for however) but the training is rather hard
    -Find work as a clinical psychologist

    I'm sorry if this has in any way discouraged you, but I just think that you really should look into this further before deciding to do something like this which takes such academic skill and commitment.

    I don't think the reality of the competition for clinical psychology has actually been made clear yet.

    For example, I'm hoping to achieve 3A*s at A-level and I am part of the city's Autism committee, volunteering at a special school and at the NHS mental health department for people struggling with mental health issues.
    And I still get sleepless nights about whether I will actually ever be good enough to get onto the doctorate in around 7-8 years time.
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    I knew all that already but it doesn't really answer my question? I've looked into it so much but it doesn't say anywhere
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    And if it doesn't matter which I take is what others have said as I've already checked its accredited before I applied? And I'm not 100% sure I want to be it as its competitor I might be a child or an education psychologist I'm just ask to make sure that routes open to me?
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    I understand that but I'm just pointing out that if you're split between psychology and sociology, you might need to decide whether to make a larger commitment than that.

    I'm not one hundred percent that you have looked into it however because if you had, you'd know if you split between sociology and psychology at Aston university you wouldn't be eligible for Graduate Chartered Membership with the British Psychological Society because it is not an accredited degree (I've looked into it on UCAS). Therefore you would not be able to go into jobs based in psychology including the ones you have listed and any other professional degrees. Besides maybe being a PWP (Psychological well-being practitioner) if you're lucky because they still find a mono-psych degree desirable.

    The mixed degree may also makes employers (i.e the NHS) question your commitment to psychology.

    If you do not get an accredited degree, which the course you're interested in is not you will not be able to be any form of professional psychologist.

    If you really, really want to do mixed psych and sociol then you're better doing it somewhere else that gives you an accredited degree or doing a conversion course afterwards.

    You must also take into account that training as a psychologist of any kind can be very costly and if you do not succeed can leave you with a big stack of bills that you do not have a professional job to pay for.

    So if you want me to answer your question directly, yes you should do straight psych.
    But I just wanted to point out that you may need to take some considerations before aspiring to be a psychologist of any shape or form.

    I also want to point out that if your degree is accredited by the BPS then it must have certain criteria that meet their standards. So I'd check to course structure if you are still interested in doing a mixed course that is accredited because I am fairly sure that it will be focused primarily on psychology.

    But may I suggest doing Social Psychology as an alternative? Then you can do sociology (most of the time) as a chosen module as well the fact that it focuses on the social side not the biological/neuro side.
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    But I looked into that so many times if its accredited how do you know if its just changed?
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    I've just looked on ucas, the website everywhere and it is accredited
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    Ok several things:

    You need to clarify whether your PARTICULAR course at Aston is eligible.

    Just because it's eligible does not mean that doctoral courses in the future will be that interested in candidates with joint honours- it is so competitive they need to see real unambiguous academic achievement in PSYCHOLOGY.

    You are in direct competition with others with single hons and possibly masters and some people have doctorates in other areas of psychology.

    To reiterate: many people - including professional psychologists see a joint honours as being less committed /useful.

    Joint honours will just not give you the breadth that single honours does.

    You mentioned educational psych and 'child' psychology. I would recommend that you really research this in depth if you want to keep your options open.

    Educational psychology is a practitioner doctorate and ridiculously competitive.
    I'm not sure what your meaning/understanding of child psychologist is? 'child' psychologists are mostly clinical psychologists.... Clinical psychology is a ridiculously competitive course. The average age of STARTING the clinical psychology course is 27/28.

    Would recommend:
    you look at Leeds clearing house for clinical psychology and look at the stats there.

    Look at clinpsy forums for aspiring clinical psychologists-there is loads of very helpful info including a section 'what I had before I started the doctorate' to give you some idea of the reality. Also there are loads of very helpful Wikis there.

    Do not take what the univeristity's tutors may say about clinical psychology /courses/application - unless they are clinical psychologists themselves. People outside the profession don't have extensive in - depth knowledge about the course. Suspect this is unlikely as Aston are not commissioned to run a clinical doctorate course.

    Personally I think you would be putting an unnecessary extra hoop in your way that you just don't need!
    There were loads of other areas I gave up formally studying to concentrate on my single hons. I still have these as interests.
    Would this not be an option for you?
    What is it about sociology you like/think useful- where do you see this helping your future career?
    You mentioned family stuff and norms and values-these are often covered in psychology - from a slightly different perspective, but even so....

    Good luck-i would really follow up those websites I recommended.

    I think you can't be over prepared in where you career path is going..




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    Gustavus said it best in my opinion, but I'd just like to point out that the joint honors course at Aston is not accredited.

    http://search.ucas.com/course/summar...81&ret=results

    Should it be accredited, it will say below the contact details.
    I have also checked the website and found no actual evidence of it being accredited other than at the bottom where it gives the unistats review.

    The uni stats review is for psychology AND sociology, so it's essentially a comparison between the two, not a single course.
    Obviously the mono-psych course is accredited and that's why it says so.

    As a final note, I would re-evaluate your career based around sociology-psychology rather than dedicate yourself to something that takes a formidable amount of commitment, far more than deciding simply giving up sociology at a university level.
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    So leave aside UCAS- the people you need to look at are the BPS- I would deffo ring them to double check:
    It looks as if that combination gives you GBR...

    http://www.bps.org.uk/bpslegacy/ac?f...Search_Type=NC
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    A lot of the time the BPS is horribly outdated on certain information but I guess leaving something like that non-updated would be crazy however.
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    SOME info may not be up to date but surely it's the BPS that decides whether a course is validated or not - it was last time I looked?!

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    As I said, it'd be crazy if it wasn't updated but I think it's definitely worth double checking!
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    I have completed a joint course in Psychology and Sociology- I graduated with hons and BPS accredited.
    The Uni organises the joint course so you are a group in your selves- ie. you have tutors overseeing the timetables, exams, advice so clashes would not be an issue. It is hard work as you have to do all of the compulsary modules for psych and then the sociology modules on top- for this reason my uni would not only consider applications from the joint course but recognise the hard work that goes into the joint degree. I loved doing a joint degree and found many helpful overlaps in modules. If it is what you are interested in then go for it, just make sure it is BPS accredited.
 
 
 
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