Chunking Watch

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shortsweetnes16
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Who did the original study and where can i find it?
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Apollo
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(Original post by shortsweetnes16)
Who did the original study and where can i find it?
i have no idea, but in math i read that word and could not stop laughing
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txt_eva
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Miller (1956) suggested that most people store about seven independent or discrete items in short term memory. These items may be numbers, letters or words, etc. Miller referred to each of these items as 'chunks'.

His theory was that we could store 7 +/- 2 items in the short term
memory.

IE-

"1" "2" "3" "4" "5" "6" "7" = 7 items

"123" "456" "789" = 3 items


Any help?

Eva
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txt_eva
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Oh yeah and....

http://www.well.com/user/smalin/miller.html is where the study should be listed... I can't check since my school for some reason thinks it is filtered... (see also here... http://psychclassics.yorku.ca/Miller/ (non filtered)

His paper was entitled "The magical number seven, plus or minus two: Some limits on our capacity for processing information."

Also a good counter page for this is here... http://www.knosof.co.uk/cbook/misart.pdf very informative, but not overly complexed.

Eva
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