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    I finish high school next year which means I need to apply to university this year preferably by October.

    I really want to go to Canada and would appreciate if you guys would tell me from personal experience on the people and culture of Canada and if international students like me can fit in well.

    Also which are the good business universities around Canada?

    Id love it if someone could help me personally thanks
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    (Original post by araikundalia)
    I finish high school next year which means I need to apply to university this year preferably by October.

    I really want to go to Canada and would appreciate if you guys would tell me from personal experience on the people and culture of Canada and if international students like me can fit in well.

    Also which are the good business universities around Canada?

    Id love it if someone could help me personally thanks
    You will fit in quite well because Canada has a lot of international students and is quite diverse.

    The best business schools in Canada are:

    Ivey Business School at Western
    Queen's Commerce

    The next level are:

    UBC Sauder
    UofT Rotman
    York Schulich
    McGill Desautels

    The next level are:

    UdeM
    UofA
    Laurier
    McMaster DeGroote

    Any school in the top 6 aka the first 2 tiers are really worth applying. My ranking is for undergraduate business only, the specifics change a bit for MBA, but generally if you are a top student at any of the top 6 you can go into even difficult careers like investment banking.
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    Thank you so much


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    The list above is pretty spot on. One big thing to consider is the location of the school. While Rotman and Desautels aren't as acclaimed as Queen's/Ivey, U of T and McGill carry a greater international reputation overall which is important if you don't intend to stay in Canada after graduating. They're also in the largest cities in Canada which provide more cultural surroundings and have the most int'l students compared to other Canadian schools. Queen's/Ivey are in smaller towns, and are very "campus" schools, and probably have the most stereotypical university experience you could imagine (think American movies about college..). I had a few friends at Queen's drop out because they hated living in Kingston so much (its a rough move if you're from Toronto and a city person!)

    I think Queen's and Ivey are also the most expensive ones on the list. (I have no idea what Ivey's tuition for int'l students would be, but for the last 2 years alone its over 40k for domestic students). Out of the six schools on that list, I think Schulich is the cheapest.

    Ryerson is also located in downtown Toronto. While it isn't that good of a school, it's improving and their business students definitely reap the benefits of being located in Toronto in terms of networking/job opportunities and I know people from that program getting comparable jobs to graduates in the other schools. York is also in Toronto but in the north end.
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    (Original post by orange94)
    I got into uoft scarbrough campus with CCC at a-LEVEL - CHEMSITRY MATHS HISTORY FOR FACULTY OF PHYSICAL AND ENVIROMENTAL SCINCE - WANT YO MAJOR IN CHEMISTRY!

    WANT TO APPLY TO UBC FOR FACULTY OF SCIENCE
    THEY LOOK 2 GCSE for grade 11
    and 3 a-levels /OR AS

    therfore 5 grades

    so AA- GCSE CORE /ADITIONAL SCIENCE -CCC - B in as maths


    CAN I GET INTO UBC WITH THESE GRADES, AFTER ALL GOT INTO UOFT!! GONNA APPLY WHEN APPLICATION OPENS SO WANT TO SEE MY CHANCE OF GETTING IN. HELP
    The fact that University of Toronto (cannot believe its ranked so well in rankings) offers CCC is exactly the reason why I dislike it so much.

    Pretty sure though that UBC will require slightly higher grades, UofT has no standards, actually none of the Canadian universities do. Any half decent Canadian high school student can get into every university in Canada with the exceptions of a small number of special programs.
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    (Original post by ukmed108)
    The fact that University of Toronto (cannot believe its ranked so well in rankings) offers CCC is exactly the reason why I dislike it so much.

    Pretty sure though that UBC will require slightly higher grades, UofT has no standards, actually none of the Canadian universities do. Any half decent Canadian high school student can get into every university in Canada with the exceptions of a small number of special programs.
    wow, actually getting into Canadian university with lower grades maybe easier than others in UK ,considering they are highly ranked. But getting into university doesn't necessarily mean you will stay and graduate.

    besides if someone has high grades prior to going university does not guarantee success. its about your individual hard work.

    if you feel the need to be snoby and passing judgment, dont bother commenting in this forum. bye bye now!
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    (Original post by orange94)
    wow, actually getting into Canadian university with lower grades maybe easier than others in UK ,considering they are highly ranked. But getting into university doesn't necessarily mean you will stay and graduate.

    besides if someone has high grades prior to going university does not guarantee success. its about your individual hard work.

    if you feel the need to be snoby and passing judgment, dont bother commenting in this forum. bye bye now!
    Whats wrong with the truth? UofT only fails a small percentage of its students. Most students are able to graduate.
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    [QUOTE=ukmed108;44634295]Whats wrong with the truth? UofT only fails a small percentage of its students. Most students are able to graduate.




    get lost now.
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    [QUOTE=orange94;44636641]
    (Original post by ukmed108)
    Whats wrong with the truth? UofT only fails a small percentage of its students. Most students are able to graduate.




    get lost now.
    Excuse me, but i'm more knowledgeable about UofT than you are so i think you just need to calm down. Not only that but you couldn't even spell in your first post and you are likely just mad that I pointed out the truth about UofT because you go there.
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    (Original post by araikundalia)
    I finish high school next year which means I need to apply to university this year preferably by October.

    I really want to go to Canada and would appreciate if you guys would tell me from personal experience on the people and culture of Canada and if international students like me can fit in well.

    Also which are the good business universities around Canada?

    Id love it if someone could help me personally thanks
    Hi there.

    Basically, the list that ukmed has stated earlier is pretty much the same rankings that I would recommend for Canadian business schools. However, I wouldn't exactly put Queen's Commerce at the very top, or at least on par with Ivey. That being said, Queen's Commerce is still a really good program and I would personally put it in between a first-tier business school and second-tier university as opposed to a top business school.

    (Original post by ukmed108)
    The fact that University of Toronto (cannot believe its ranked so well in rankings) offers CCC is exactly the reason why I dislike it so much.

    Pretty sure though that UBC will require slightly higher grades, UofT has no standards, actually none of the Canadian universities do. Any half decent Canadian high school student can get into every university in Canada with the exceptions of a small number of special programs.
    Well, that is a subjective thing to say, because first of all, the person who said he/she was accepted was applying for U of T Scarborough. Since he/she is not applying to the main campus, I wouldn't be surprised that he/she would be able to get in with a CCC. It is considered a lower-grade version of the main campus (U of T St. George) and thus will not represent U of T entirely. Given that it is not as strong of a contender to the main campus, I am definitely sure that the downtown campus will require higher grades to get in (at least a BBB for its general arts and sciences program).

    I do somewhat agree with you on the fact that U of T does not have much restrictions to its admission requirements, but I would disagree with your statement that all Canadian universities don't have standards. The problem with U of T is that although many do get in, a lot of them do eventually get kicked out (either in their first year, second year, or even third year) due to the bell-curving system or the fact that they do poorly and they aren't able to continue on with graduate studies. If you look at life sciences, for example, around 20-30% of first year students do switch to another university or program and decide not to continue on with life sciences. In a class of 1,000 people, that is the equivalent of 200 to 300 people, which is a significant number. With all due respect, I would say that it is easy being admitted in, but I wouldn't say it's easy finishing your undergraduate career AND doing well.

    As for other Canadian universities, they do set standards for international students, albeit not as competitive as U of T. Some of them are more stringent than U of T (i.e. McGill, UBC, competitive programs). It shouldn't be assumed that all Canadian universities don't have standards. Just because they provide lower admission requirements than UK universities it does not mean that the universities do not set standards for its applicants. In my opinion, it is just a matter of accepting more applicants in the hopes of getting more money from these international students, but in the end, it all depends on the student to ensure his/her success. Therefore, it is not a matter of setting standards, but rather setting out laxer admission requirements than UK universities. It doesn't make Canadian universities any less reputable than they are.
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    (Original post by zero_Gravity91)
    Hi there.

    Basically, the list that ukmed has stated earlier is pretty much the same rankings that I would recommend for Canadian business schools. However, I wouldn't exactly put Queen's Commerce at the very top, or at least on par with Ivey. That being said, Queen's Commerce is still a really good program and I would personally put it in between a first-tier business school and second-tier university as opposed to a top business school.



    Well, that is a subjective thing to say, because first of all, the person who said he/she was accepted was applying for U of T Scarborough. Since he/she is not applying to the main campus, I wouldn't be surprised that he/she would be able to get in with a CCC. It is considered a lower-grade version of the main campus (U of T St. George) and thus will not represent U of T entirely. Given that it is not as strong of a contender to the main campus, I am definitely sure that the downtown campus will require higher grades to get in (at least a BBB for its general arts and sciences program).

    I do somewhat agree with you on the fact that U of T does not have much restrictions to its admission requirements, but I would disagree with your statement that all Canadian universities don't have standards. The problem with U of T is that although many do get in, a lot of them do eventually get kicked out (either in their first year, second year, or even third year) due to the bell-curving system or the fact that they do poorly and they aren't able to continue on with graduate studies. If you look at life sciences, for example, around 20-30% of first year students do switch to another university or program and decide not to continue on with life sciences. In a class of 1,000 people, that is the equivalent of 200 to 300 people, which is a significant number. With all due respect, I would say that it is easy being admitted in, but I wouldn't say it's easy finishing your undergraduate career AND doing well.

    As for other Canadian universities, they do set standards for international students, albeit not as competitive as U of T. Some of them are more stringent than U of T (i.e. McGill, UBC, competitive programs). It shouldn't be assumed that all Canadian universities don't have standards. Just because they provide lower admission requirements than UK universities it does not mean that the universities do not set standards for its applicants. In my opinion, it is just a matter of accepting more applicants in the hopes of getting more money from these international students, but in the end, it all depends on the student to ensure his/her success. Therefore, it is not a matter of setting standards, but rather setting out laxer admission requirements than UK universities. It doesn't make Canadian universities any less reputable than they are.
    The problem with this is you end up having a huge class with a widely diverse range of talent. I know people who didn't study, did hard drugs and skipped most classes and ended up doing English at UofT main campus. When i saw him he had bloodshot eyes and looked like he belonged in the ghetto not on campus. I thought he would drop out, and he's still there in 2nd year. A top university shouldn't be admitting people with 70s, it hurts the people who are really intelligent because they have to deal with huge class sizes, impersonal teaching by TAs and a lack of campus resources.

    UofT has one of the lowest student satisfactions in Canada according to Macleans and its not hard to find out why. Most of its students are commuters who head home after class, hardly conducive to campus life.

    Worse yet, it ruins UofT's reputation. Saying you go to UofT doesn't say anything about your perceived intelligence like saying you went to Oxford or Harvard would. It just says oh you made it into university, tell me more.

    Employers have wisened up to this. Its really a shame because UofT could have been a great university of around 20,000 smart people but instead it ballooned into Canada's equivalent of Open U with 3 campuses.

    All UofT does with the international student's money is funnel it straight into researcher's pockets which helps it maintain high international rankings but nothing else.
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    (Original post by ukmed108)
    The problem with this is you end up having a huge class with a widely diverse range of talent. I know people who didn't study, did hard drugs and skipped most classes and ended up doing English at UofT main campus. When i saw him he had bloodshot eyes and looked like he belonged in the ghetto not on campus. I thought he would drop out, and he's still there in 2nd year. A top university shouldn't be admitting people with 70s, it hurts the people who are really intelligent because they have to deal with huge class sizes, impersonal teaching by TAs and a lack of campus resources.

    UofT has one of the lowest student satisfactions in Canada according to Macleans and its not hard to find out why. Most of its students are commuters who head home after class, hardly conducive to campus life.

    Worse yet, it ruins UofT's reputation. Saying you go to UofT doesn't say anything about your perceived intelligence like saying you went to Oxford or Harvard would. It just says oh you made it into university, tell me more.

    Employers have wisened up to this. Its really a shame because UofT could have been a great university of around 20,000 smart people but instead it ballooned into Canada's equivalent of Open U with 3 campuses.

    All UofT does with the international student's money is funnel it straight into researcher's pockets which helps it maintain high international rankings but nothing else.
    That is true, but I believe there is a reason why the university has implemented probationary status and suspension for those that are unable to do well in their studies. It's true that there is a wide range of talent, but that could be said for the same for many other education systems in other countries. This is the case with public French universities and while they admit every single student that pass the baccalauréat, not everyone can continue on with the program of their choice after their first year of studies and either decide to drop out of university or choose alternative options.

    While it may be true that many people have been admitted into the main campus, just because they are at U of T St. George doesn't mean that they will do well. Like I said before, it's easy to get in, but it's hard to get out and do well in your studies, given the huge number of students and the bell-curving technique that most classes use at U of T.

    I do agree with you on the fact that U of T doesn't hold much of a campus culture, but that doesn't dent much of U of T's reputation. I know so many people that still choose U of T just because of its reputation and prestige within Canada. It's also true that going to U of T doesn't say much about your intelligence, but you are comparing apples with oranges. U of T will NEVER be, and highly unlikely, be on the same playing field as Oxford nor Harvard, though it is still considered to be one of the best universities in Canada.

    I can't say much about whether employees recognize the importance of U of T or not, but one thing that is for sure is that they are looking for things other than where you have graduated from. To be employed depends on your own ability and is not based on a university's reputation, so you are using the wrong variables to measure how employable one is. I still consider U of T to be a great university and I wouldn't compare it to Open U, since again, they are on two different levels. Another thing is that there are many great universities with regional campuses, so I don't think that makes much of a difference, but one thing that is for sure is that those campuses cannot compare with the main campus.

    I somewhat agree with your last point that the revenues that they gain from tuition fees are funnelled into research, but I believe that could be said for most top universities in the world. The thing is that the university education system has always been focusing on research as a main priority and that is the sad truth.
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    (Original post by zero_Gravity91)
    That is true, but I believe there is a reason why the university has implemented probationary status and suspension for those that are unable to do well in their studies. It's true that there is a wide range of talent, but that could be said for the same for many other education systems in other countries. This is the case with public French universities and while they admit every single student that pass the baccalauréat, not everyone can continue on with the program of their choice after their first year of studies and either decide to drop out of university or choose alternative options.

    While it may be true that many people have been admitted into the main campus, just because they are at U of T St. George doesn't mean that they will do well. Like I said before, it's easy to get in, but it's hard to get out and do well in your studies, given the huge number of students and the bell-curving technique that most classes use at U of T.

    I do agree with you on the fact that U of T doesn't hold much of a campus culture, that doesn't dent much of U of T's reputation. I know so many people that still choose U of T just because of its reputation and prestige within Canada. It's also true that going to U of T doesn't say much about your intelligence, but you are comparing apples with oranges. U of T will NEVER be, and highly unlikely, be on the same playing field as Oxford nor Harvard, though it is still considered to be one of the best universities in Canada.

    I can't say much about whether employees recognize the importance of U of T or not, but one thing that is for sure is that they are looking for things other than where you have graduated from. To be employed depends on your own ability and is not based on a university's reputation, so you are using the wrong variables to measure how employable one is. I still consider U of T to be a great university and I wouldn't compare it to Open U, since again, they are on two different levels. Another thing is that there are many great universities with regional campuses, so I don't think that makes much of a difference, but one thing that is for sure is that those campuses cannot compare with the main campus.

    I somewhat agree with your last point that the revenues that they gain from tuition fees are funnelled into research, but I believe that could be said for most top universities in the world. The thing is that the university education system has always been focusing on research as a main priority and that is the sad truth.
    I'm really glad you agree. I really think it depends on the university for your last point. Smaller universities really do tend to be better at teaching than larger ones. I go to St Andrews, and its quite a small uni, but the class sizes are very small, we are always taught by lecturers/professors but never TAs and student satisfaction is very high. Almost everyone also lives on campus. In Canada, there is almost no equivalent of St Andrews, the ones that exist are usually almost unknown to anyone outside the local area.
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    For the international students the admission requirements for the Queens Commerce are:

    Minimum of 7 AS level with at least 3 At Advanced level
    Mathematics has to be at advanced level and English at lest at ordinary level.

    Isn't it INSANE ? 7AS level , I wouldn't be able to even fit it in my timetable. I did 6 hoping I could be considered, but **** it. This is the reason they do not have A level students...
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    Can anyone help me with a list of "lower" ranked universities or colleges in Canada just incase the grade requirements are not met?


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    (Original post by araikundalia)
    Can anyone help me with a list of "lower" ranked universities or colleges in Canada just incase the grade requirements are not met?


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    There are a lot of lower-ranked universities, so it's really hard to give you a list of all of them.

    I think it will be a good idea if you could tell us your grades so we could help you better.
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    Toronto!!!!!!!!

    i wana visit canada!! XD
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    Can anyone help me with a list of lower ranked Canadian universities or colleges to apply to?
    My current predicted grades are ABB for A level
 
 
 
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