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Why are so many top unis in clearing, compared to previous years? Watch

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    Even competitive courses like Law etc..

    does this mean that a lot of people have missed offers or that the uni is undersubscribed? :confused:
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    I think it means that now that they can take more people, they want more money.
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    A mixture of both I think, but not a lot to tell at the moment. There's a fall in applicants this year anyway with the tuition fees which will leave courses under subscribed, but the exams were supposed to be harder than usual this year too so people might have missed their offers. Suppose it doesn't really matter, the only thing that does is your track in a few hours
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    My firm UCL hasn't got a single place in Clearing which does not bode well for me if I've missed my offer. Oh well 4 hours to go!
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    (Original post by acceptingme)
    My firm UCL hasn't got a single place in Clearing which does not bode well for me if I've missed my offer. Oh well 4 hours to go!
    Good luck!
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    (Original post by acceptingme)
    My firm UCL hasn't got a single place in Clearing which does not bode well for me if I've missed my offer. Oh well 4 hours to go!
    UCL's policy is to never enter clearing, which I think actually bodes well for you! As they don't consider applicants who haven't already applied to them, applicants who've missed their offer tend to get in anyway (according to several friends of mine currently studying there).
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    (Original post by Vian)
    UCL's policy is to never enter clearing, which I think actually bodes well for you! As they don't consider applicants who haven't already applied to them, applicants who've missed their offer tend to get in anyway (according to several friends of mine currently studying there).
    Probably this.

    I don't think they like being an insurance choice and they probably accept applicants who narrowly miss their grades.

    What does make me wonder is say if one funny year, 100 candidates of each Cambridge, Oxford and UCL missed their offers would they still refuse adjustment. 100 less students per year would mean an overall lose of £27m - Oxbridge could afford that tbh.
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    (Original post by noone29)

    What does make me wonder is say if one funny year, 100 candidates of each Cambridge, Oxford and UCL missed their offers would they still refuse adjustment. 100 less students per year would mean an overall lose of £27m - Oxbridge could afford that tbh.
    The real threat to the Oxbridge admissions system is people meeting their offers but going to study in the States.

    UCAS's predecessor UCCA was invented to stop applicants accepting multiple university places. Oxbridge didn't join initially because there was nothing in it for them. Provided Oxford and Cambridge managed candidates who applied to both (this wasn't banned until the 1980s) between themselves, they knew that virtually everyone with multiple offers/acceptances would choose to enrol with them and leave some other university in the lurch. Eventually they were persuaded to join, but on their own terms.

    Now Oxbridge is in potentially the same position as a redbrick in the 1950s. Someone may accept an Oxbridge offer, get an unconditional scholarship place in the USA but not withdraw from UCAS. The first Oxford or Cambridge may know is when the student fails to show up on the first day of Michaelmas term.
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    The real threat to the Oxbridge admissions system is people meeting their offers but going to study in the States.

    UCAS's predecessor UCCA was invented to stop applicants accepting multiple university places. Oxbridge didn't join initially because there was nothing in it for them. Provided Oxford and Cambridge managed candidates who applied to both (this wasn't banned until the 1980s) between themselves, they knew that virtually everyone with multiple offers/acceptances would choose to enrol with them and leave some other university in the lurch. Eventually they were persuaded to join, but on their own terms.

    Now Oxbridge is in potentially the same position as a redbrick in the 1950s. Someone may accept an Oxbridge offer, get an unconditional scholarship place in the USA but not withdraw from UCAS. The first Oxford or Cambridge may know is when the student fails to show up on the first day of Michaelmas term.
    Does it happen a lot or is it rare? When you talk of Red Bricks are you saying that their candidates once upon a time received a lot of offers from American unis?

    Can see the benefits of going to America for sports tbh
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    (Original post by noone29)
    Does it happen a lot or is it rare? When you talk of Red Bricks are you saying that their candidates once upon a time received a lot of offers from American unis?

    Can see the benefits of going to America for sports tbh
    It costs about $50k a year though for Ivy league unis
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    (Original post by noone29)
    Does it happen a lot or is it rare? When you talk of Red Bricks are you saying that their candidates once upon a time received a lot of offers from American unis?

    Can see the benefits of going to America for sports tbh
    No, you have misunderstood.

    60 years or so ago, before UCCA was created people applied individually to universities and there was a problem that people accepted more than one offer. So assume someone applied to, received offers from and accepted all of Cambridge, London (Imperial College) and Manchester, they could only attend one. Virtually every candidate would actually turn up and start the course at Cambridge. Imperial and Manchester would be left high and dry. Another candidate applied to, receive offers from and accept Manchester, Liverpool and Leeds. He might turn up at Leeds. Manchester and Liverpool would be left high and dry.

    It was this problem that UCCA was set up to address. Candidates could only accept one firm and one insurance offer and they could only apply to 5 choices. If you are London, Manchester, Liverpool and Leeds, It is obvious that UCCA is better than a free for all. With a free for all, you might be a candidate's preferred university but you might equally be one of the ones that the candidate rejects. In creating UCCA, universities had to get rid of their own quirks and peculiarities from their admissions systems and operate a national system.

    However, if you are Oxford or Cambridge, there is no real benefit to you from UCCA because Oxford and Cambridge don't have a problem with candidates accepting them and say Liverpool and then the candidate actually going to Liverpool. Oxford and Cambridge's only threat is each other. Provided the newly established admissions offices at Oxford and Cambridge liaise with each other in respect of candidates who apply to both (then permitted) they don't have a problem that candidates have applied elsewhere as well. They are only gainers from and never losers to multiple applicants.

    For that reason, Oxford and Cambridge had to be persuaded to join UCCA and when they joined, the other universities allowed them, had to allow them, to keep their own exam based admissions systems.

    Move forward 60 years. Now everyone in the UK is applying through UCAS but a small though increasing number of applicants are also chasing places (and scholarships) in the USA. Some public school heads are reporting more than 1/3 of their pupils pursuing US universities. US universities are not on UCAS. They recruit after the Oxbridge admissions system but before A level results day and they tend to make unconditional offers. Suddenly Oxford and Cambridge are in the position of Leeds and Liverpool, 60 years ago. Candidates may accept places there through UCAS but never turn up to start the course.

    The numbers are still modest, but are increasing, and the problem is compounded that applications are made for separate colleges at Oxford and Cambridge. An effect that would not be significant across a university or even across a course, may be much more significant to a college that takes fewer than 100 undergrads a year.
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    (Original post by noone29)
    Does it happen a lot or is it rare? When you talk of Red Bricks are you saying that their candidates once upon a time received a lot of offers from American unis?

    Can see the benefits of going to America for sports tbh
    That depends on what you'd consider a lot...:dontknow: I haven't looked at the very latest admission statistics, but over the past few years it was usually around 5% of (successful) Oxbridge applicants that ended up rejecting their offers and going elsewhere. A fair few of them probably did go to US universities, but it's impossible to say how many exactly.
    (Original post by yaboy)
    It costs about $50k a year though for Ivy league unis
    That's why nulli tertius' post mentioned scholarships. It's probably worth pointing out in this context that those US scholarships for international students are the exception, not the norm and only a handful of highly competitive places offer them (though I suppose people still think they're worth a try even if it's a long shot). The regular costs are extortionate, of course, but if you're one of the lucky few to be offered a full scholarship it should be very tempting, especially now that tuition fees have risen so much.
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    There are various reasons, including
    - falling applications, due to (a) fee rises, and (b) falling numbers of 18 year olds being in existence
    - ABB+ rules, which means that the government will allow them to take as many students with ABB+ or the equivalent as they like (though they will be constrained by things like space in lecture theatres and accommodation.
 
 
 
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