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    How would having done a foundation year (at Queen Mary or UCL) before the LLB affect my chanes at gaining a pupillage/TC? I have a non-UK GCE-equivalent qualification with very good grades but most UK universities also require additional A-levels hence the foundation year.

    However I imagine it wouldn't look good at all in my CV, am I right?
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    I am also an international student and have done a foundation year at a college in London. Why do you think it wouldn't look good at all in your CV? I am asking because it might be a reason for me to start panicking!
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    (Original post by Romanos)
    How would having done a foundation year (at Queen Mary or UCL) before the LLB affect my chanes at gaining a pupillage/TC? I have a non-UK GCE-equivalent qualification with very good grades but most UK universities also require additional A-levels hence the foundation year.

    However I imagine it wouldn't look good at all in my CV, am I right?
    It will not hinder your application because most applications ask if you have international qualifications and there will be a system of equivalency, if you have good grades in these international qualifications that are equivalent to ABB/AAB/AAA or whatever it is TC and pupillage forms request nowadays you will not be hindered. Further your foundation year will be a minor introduction to law so firms will not look too much into it. Finally UCL is probably one of the top 5 law schools in the country and any law degree from there will be adored by employers regardless of whether there is a foundation course attached to it, as long as you get a 2:1 or above you'll be fine
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    I can't speak from personal experience, but I'd say that it won't. Almost every top uni has a foundation year with direct progression onto Law, so if your foundation marks were enough to give you entry to a place like QMUL, UCL, Manchester, Nottingham, Bristol and many others I suppose in theory you'll be on par with students who entered via A-Levels, thus being at their AAA/AAB level. Manchester's foundation programme, for instance, uses a mark system where a progression to Law requires a AAA mark (and 360 points by their own standards), which is very similar to a standard entry, thus I'm sure it has somewhat of a high academic level. Furthermore, I've read that firms use A Levels as a mere filter. It's hard to imagine someone with a first from a top 20 university having a career ruined because of a foundation year.

    Be aware, though, that UCL's foundation programme has suffered several criticism from prospective law and economics students. I'd avise you to look further into that.
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    (Original post by Romanos)
    How would having done a foundation year (at Queen Mary or UCL) before the LLB affect my chanes at gaining a pupillage/TC? I have a non-UK GCE-equivalent qualification with very good grades but most UK universities also require additional A-levels hence the foundation year.

    However I imagine it wouldn't look good at all in my CV, am I right?
    As others have explained, the CV is not your problem.

    Please check with QMUL and UCL and ask what are their progression rates for foundation year students onto their own LLBs. In addition, ask them where did last year's foundation year students who did not progress on to their own degrees end up.

    You may be in for quite a shock.
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    Many thanks everyone for your anwers!

    (Original post by woody-wood)
    It will not hinder your application because most applications ask if you have international qualifications and there will be a system of equivalency, if you have good grades in these international qualifications that are equivalent to ABB/AAB/AAA or whatever it is TC and pupillage forms request nowadays you will not be hindered. Further your foundation year will be a minor introduction to law so firms will not look too much into it. Finally UCL is probably one of the top 5 law schools in the country and any law degree from there will be adored by employers regardless of whether there is a foundation course attached to it, as long as you get a 2:1 or above you'll be fine
    From what little information I've been able to gather, it seems my grade equals AAB on its own, so that should count for something.

    (Original post by Heteronym)
    I can't speak from personal experience, but I'd say that it won't. Almost every top uni has a foundation year with direct progression onto Law, so if your foundation marks were enough to give you entry to a place like QMUL, UCL, Manchester, Nottingham, Bristol and many others I suppose in theory you'll be on par with students who entered via A-Levels, thus being at their AAA/AAB level. Manchester's foundation programme, for instance, uses a mark system where a progression to Law requires a AAA mark (and 360 points by their own standards), which is very similar to a standard entry, thus I'm sure it has somewhat of a high academic level. Furthermore, I've read that firms use A Levels as a mere filter. It's hard to imagine someone with a first from a top 20 university having a career ruined because of a foundation year.

    Be aware, though, that UCL's foundation programme has suffered several criticism from prospective law and economics students. I'd avise you to look further into that.
    Yeah, I've come across the critism you're referring to about the UCL FP and -frankly, due to its absolutely undeservered astronomical fees (£14k:eek:)- if I am to do that, I will be going to QMUL. Do you maybe happen to know/have heard anything about it?

    I do like that both you and woody-wood implied that getting a very, very good grade is needed as a kind of compensation for the foundation year (ofc, I know it's needed anyway but the wording gave that impression to me).

    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    As others have explained, the CV is not your problem.

    Please check with QMUL and UCL and ask what are their progression rates for foundation year students onto their own LLBs. In addition, ask them where did last year's foundation year students who did not progress on to their own degrees end up.

    You may be in for quite a shock.
    Yeah, this PDF gave me some chills tbh. Seems like you either go to the same uni, or you're going to dive deeply into the ranking tables (which, having done 1 year extra and the bigger debt and expense, is simply not sustainable).

    Email sent with a bunch of specific questions, though you sound like you have the general picture. Is it that bad?
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    (Original post by Romanos)

    Email sent with a bunch of specific questions, though you sound like you have the general picture. Is it that bad?
    I don't have any statistics but there are quite a few academics uncomfortable with what amounts to prostituting the universities names. All leading universities in the world have their cash cow courses whose fees are far in excess of the reasonable costs of the course, but at least you end up with a well regarded qualification. The problem here is that people are hooked on the opportunity of an LLB at a first rate institution that few ever have the chance to experience.
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    (Original post by Romanos)

    Yeah, I've come across the critism you're referring to about the UCL FP and -frankly, due to its absolutely undeservered astronomical fees (£14k:eek:)- if I am to do that, I will be going to QMUL. Do you maybe happen to know/have heard anything about it?

    I do like that both you and woody-wood implied that getting a very, very good grade is needed as a kind of compensation for the foundation year (ofc, I know it's needed anyway but the wording gave that impression to me).
    Hm, I don't know if it has to be compensated. I'm on the same boat as you (a prospective foundation student), so it's hard to give a fair account. However, 2:1 seems the bare minimum these days, so a first class degree is just a way to be "safe" (if there is one!).

    It could be argued that an access course (that is very similar to a foundation year) is an "easier" way to enter prestigious universities, which then could raise some doubts in the minds of employers. However, your taking the foundation year is apparently solely due the fact that you, as an international student (I'm assuming), do not qualify for direct entry onto an undegraduate degree through no fault of your own.

    Law firms do use A Levels filters, but (just a guess) I believe this is just a way to select students in an automatic computered way. It's not likely they will want to analyse it further. Someone from QMUL or UCL is not the kind of person they want to filter out, anyway. Those are highly regarded institutions that select themselves the kind of student they want there.

    Through a quick search on TSR you'll find some threads about QMUL's foundation programme, but I can't say anything about it. I would suggest you look into other prestigious universities that offer a foundation year with direct progression onto Law:

    Bristol
    Nottingham
    KCL
    Manchester
    Exeter
    Newcastle
    East Anglia
    Leeds
    Surrey
    Sussex
    Leicester
    Lancaster
    Liverpool
    Sheffield
    Durham
    Warwick
    Southampton
    York
    Edinburgh
    St. Andrews
    Glasgow

    As you can see, the options are plenty. Additionally, universities might accept other programmes as a suitable qualification. For example, Manchester even provides a list: http://www.law.manchester.ac.uk/unde...ion/index.html

    Good luck with your choice and your subsequent law course.
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    (Original post by Heteronym)
    Hm, I don't know if it has to be compensated. I'm on the same boat as you (a prospective foundation student), so it's hard to give a fair account. However, 2:1 seems the bare minimum these days, so a first class degree is just a way to be "safe" (if there is one!).

    It could be argued that an access course (that is very similar to a foundation year) is an "easier" way to enter prestigious universities, which then could raise some doubts in the minds of employers. However, your taking the foundation year is apparently solely due the fact that you, as an international student (I'm assuming), do not qualify for direct entry onto an undegraduate degree through no fault of your own.

    Law firms do use A Levels filters, but (just a guess) I believe this is just a way to select students in an automatic computered way. It's not likely they will want to analyse it further. Someone from QMUL or UCL is not the kind of person they want to filter out, anyway. Those are highly regarded institutions that select themselves the kind of student they want there.

    Through a quick search on TSR you'll find some threads about QMUL's foundation programme, but I can't say anything about it. I would suggest you look into other prestigious universities that offer a foundation year with direct progression onto Law:

    Bristol
    Nottingham
    KCL
    Manchester
    Exeter
    Newcastle
    East Anglia
    Leeds
    Surrey
    Sussex
    Leicester
    Lancaster
    Liverpool
    Sheffield
    Durham
    Warwick
    Southampton
    York
    Edinburgh
    St. Andrews
    Glasgow

    As you can see, the options are plenty. Additionally, universities might accept other programmes as a suitable qualification. For example, Manchester even provides a list: http://www.law.manchester.ac.uk/unde...ion/index.html

    Good luck with your choice and your subsequent law course.
    Thanks, that was very helpful!
 
 
 
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