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    So I have been offered BA law at middlesex where can I go with this?? can I do teaching?:eek:
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    (Original post by sonnn)
    So I have been offered BA law at middlesex where can I go with this?? can I do teaching?:eek:
    You can go into teaching from most subjects, although you would of course need to do a PGCE after the degree or do a scheme like Teach First. Law is obviously a very well regarded degree with many career options. However, it sounds like you don't really know much about Law and were not planning on studying it. It's not something you should rush into, so if there is an element here of grabbing any chance you get to go to university I would urge caution. There is absolutely nothing wrong with taking some time out and reapplying or working on your grades. Better that than entering on a course you don't really know much about and don't know if you want to study!
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    (Original post by F1 fanatic)
    You can go into teaching from most subjects, although you would of course need to do a PGCE after the degree or do a scheme like Teach First. Law is obviously a very well regarded degree with many career options. However, it sounds like you don't really know much about Law and were not planning on studying it. It's not something you should rush into, so if there is an element here of grabbing any chance you get to go to university I would urge caution. There is absolutely nothing wrong with taking some time out and reapplying or working on your grades. Better that than entering on a course you don't really know much about and don't know if you want to study!

    Yes I'm afraid your right! At first I though law would be a really good course but after realising that my grades were going to let me down and not going to a Russel group uni would leave me with a bleak job prospect, I decided that I would go through clearing for an alternative course. However my grades are so bad that I think I should go back to 6th form and improve my grades and re-apply next year. In the end I do want to go into teaching and do a PGCE. Everything is so stressful, I can only retake 2 of my alevels and the other I doubt because the school has changed exams boards.
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    (Original post by F1 fanatic)
    You can go into teaching from most subjects, although you would of course need to do a PGCE after the degree or do a scheme like Teach First. Law is obviously a very well regarded degree with many career options. However, it sounds like you don't really know much about Law and were not planning on studying it. It's not something you should rush into, so if there is an element here of grabbing any chance you get to go to university I would urge caution. There is absolutely nothing wrong with taking some time out and reapplying or working on your grades. Better that than entering on a course you don't really know much about and don't know if you want to study!

    To add to this I was looking at a social science related degree... like pol/IR and then doing a pgce in a related field as long as I could justify how it links. I'm clearly lost
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    (Original post by sonnn)
    To add to this I was looking at a social science related degree... like pol/IR and then doing a pgce in a related field as long as I could justify how it links. I'm clearly lost
    What are your A Level subjects

    Are you thinking of primary or secondary teaching
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    (Original post by TenOfThem)
    What are your A Level subjects

    Are you thinking of primary or secondary teaching

    History, Lit and politics and secondary
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    (Original post by sonnn)
    History, Lit and politics and secondary
    Law isn't a popular gcse, so there isn't a pgce for it. If you wanted to teach you'd be better off doing a more popular subject. You can do a pgce in the social sciences, but a degree in law wouldn't really qualify you for it.
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    (Original post by sonnn)
    History, Lit and politics and secondary
    Frankly, would you have the grades for something like this?

    http://www.bishopg.ac.uk/?_id=10627

    A non-qualifying law degree (which is what Middlesex's BA is) is of no use in the legal profession and as others have said, it is a hard road to become a teacher when you set out with a degree in an "odd" subject.

    The reason I put up Bishop Grot is not because they pay me commission, but because provided you graduate and do a PGCE you are virtually guaranteed a teaching career. Their employment statistics are simply off the scale. There are more unemployed Oxbridge firsts than Bishop Grot newly qualified teachers.
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    (Original post by sonnn)
    History, Lit and politics and secondary
    And what are your grades

    You can do any degree then a PGCE but the more relevance to secondary subjects the better as someone actually has to recruit you to a teaching position and they will want your knowledge to be relevant
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    (Original post by Shelly_x)
    Law isn't a popular gcse, so there isn't a pgce for it. If you wanted to teach you'd be better off doing a more popular subject. You can do a pgce in the social sciences, but a degree in law wouldn't really qualify you for it.
    What about International politics?
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    (Original post by TenOfThem)
    And what are your grades

    You can do any degree then a PGCE but the more relevance to secondary subjects the better as someone actually has to recruit you to a teaching position and they will want your knowledge to be relevant
    I feel the need to retake tbh, apply next year to a politics course and then do a PGCE.
    Or the other option is to ask to change course from law to international politics.
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    Frankly, would you have the grades for something like this?

    http://www.bishopg.ac.uk/?_id=10627

    A non-qualifying law degree (which is what Middlesex's BA is) is of no use in the legal profession and as others have said, it is a hard road to become a teacher when you set out with a degree in an "odd" subject.

    The reason I put up Bishop Grot is not because they pay me commission, but because provided you graduate and do a PGCE you are virtually guaranteed a teaching career. Their employment statistics are simply off the scale. There are more unemployed Oxbridge firsts than Bishop Grot newly qualified teachers.
    I'd love to be funded by Bishop Grot. It has a wonderfully louche sound to it. Like the Borgias.

    Seriously OP, do not rush into things this way. It will only lead to unhappiness. Bishop Grot is an excellent idea.
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    (Original post by sonnn)
    I feel the need to retake tbh, apply next year to a politics course and then do a PGCE.
    Or the other option is to ask to change course from law to international politics.
    Both good ideas

    Good luck either way
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    (Original post by sonnn)
    What about International politics?
    To do a PGCE in Secondary you must prove that at least 50% of your degree is relevant to the subject you want to teach. As neither law or politics are particuarly popular at GCSE, theres not a PGCE just for these subjects. Therefore, you'd need to pick a subject which there IS a PGCE for and prove that whatever degree you do is relevant to that subject by 50%. Some people with politics degrees manage to do this with a History PGCE, but its not recommended that you try this because History is one of the most competitive PGCEs to get on to.
    If your heart is set on teaching then you should probably pick a degree in a subject that is in the national curriculum. However, if you're using teaching as a back up option for your real career then this isn't going to work. These days, teaching is an extremely difficult profession to get into and you need a lot of drive and motivation to succeed in an application.
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    (Original post by Shelly_x)
    To do a PGCE in Secondary you must prove that at least 50% of your degree is relevant to the subject you want to teach. As neither law or politics are particuarly popular at GCSE, theres not a PGCE just for these subjects. Therefore, you'd need to pick a subject which there IS a PGCE for and prove that whatever degree you do is relevant to that subject by 50%. Some people with politics degrees manage to do this with a History PGCE, but its not recommended that you try this because History is one of the most competitive PGCEs to get on to.
    If your heart is set on teaching then you should probably pick a degree in a subject that is in the national curriculum. However, if you're using teaching as a back up option for your real career then this isn't going to work. These days, teaching is an extremely difficult profession to get into and you need a lot of drive and motivation to succeed in an application.
    Completely correct. (I'm a teacher myself.) I'm very puzzled by my son's friend managing to teach English through Teach First with a Law degree though, and am reluctant to believe it's just because it's from Oxford, because I thought the 50%+ rule was pretty firm. Certainly your advice is spot on.
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    (Original post by carnationlilyrose)
    Completely correct. (I'm a teacher myself.) I'm very puzzled by my son's friend managing to teach English through Teach First with a Law degree though, and am reluctant to believe it's just because it's from Oxford, because I thought the 50%+ rule was pretty firm. Certainly your advice is spot on.
    Teach First operates on its own rules pretty much. It lets you teach a subject if you have just an A Level in that subject.
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    (Original post by Shelly_x)
    To do a PGCE in Secondary you must prove that at least 50% of your degree is relevant to the subject you want to teach. As neither law or politics are particuarly popular at GCSE, theres not a PGCE just for these subjects. Therefore, you'd need to pick a subject which there IS a PGCE for and prove that whatever degree you do is relevant to that subject by 50%. Some people with politics degrees manage to do this with a History PGCE, but its not recommended that you try this because History is one of the most competitive PGCEs to get on to.
    If your heart is set on teaching then you should probably pick a degree in a subject that is in the national curriculum. However, if you're using teaching as a back up option for your real career then this isn't going to work. These days, teaching is an extremely difficult profession to get into and you need a lot of drive and motivation to succeed in an application.
    I plan to get some work experience in secondary schools that teach history, what else would you recommend? I have previous experience in helping out at these Sunday classes if that's any help...
    Right now I am going to look for a history n politics degree through clearing, if they accept me then great. Otherwise I'll retake my alevels, gain work experience and apply next year.
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    (Original post by sonnn)
    I plan to get some work experience in secondary schools that teach history, what else would you recommend? I have previous experience in helping out at these Sunday classes if that's any help...
    Right now I am going to look for a history n politics degree through clearing, if they accept me then great. Otherwise I'll retake my alevels, gain work experience and apply next year.
    Youth clubs, brownies, scouts, etc. Also try get some experience in year 5/6 in primary school to help you understand the transition between primary and secondary.
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    (Original post by Shelly_x)
    Teach First operates on its own rules pretty much. It lets you teach a subject if you have just an A Level in that subject.
    That explains it, then. We've not had any Teach First students at our school. Not the right kind of school.
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    (Original post by carnationlilyrose)
    Completely correct. (I'm a teacher myself.) I'm very puzzled by my son's friend managing to teach English through Teach First with a Law degree though, and am reluctant to believe it's just because it's from Oxford, because I thought the 50%+ rule was pretty firm. Certainly your advice is spot on.
    If I was to do a history and politics degree would I have a better chance?
    What subject do you teach?
 
 
 
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