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    Hi, I've been ringing up universities via Adjustment.

    I'm in a position where I can either opt for:
    -chemistry at the University of Birmingham
    -chemistry at the University of Warwick
    -chemical engineering at Aston University
    -electrical with
    energy engineering at the University of Birmingham
    -civil with energy engineering at the University of Birmingham
    -materials science with energy engineering at the University of Birmingham

    I got As in both Chemistry and Biology and a B in maths. I'm prepared to cover the relevant topics in Physics through self study before uni starts. Will it be a big disadvantage not having done Physics at A-level?

    Would you guys hold a opinion about which of the above courses carries the greatest weight in the job market?

    Bursary wise over 4 years:
    +£7000 with a chemistry course
    at the University of Birmingham
    +£6000 with a engineering course at the University of Birmingham
    +£4800 with a chemistry course at Warwick
    +£3200 with a chemical engineering course at Aston University

    As you can see I'd be better off financially in the short term with chemistry at Birmingham. I, however, am unsure about the job prospects, that is where I need your opinion. I am sure I will be better off in the long term financially picking the degree with the best prospects rather than focusing on the bursaries.

    PS
    I'll be attending a clearing/adjustment open day tomorrow at both Aston and Birmingham, then on Saturday at Warwick.

    Thanks.
    • TSR Support Team
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    You'd be best off picking the course with the best job prospects financially - most figures I can find are total graduates rather than of that department, so ask from each department what percentage end up in work with 6 months of graduating to give yourself a decent idea of which one has the best prospects.

    As for physics - I'd say that not having done it at a-level would be a drawback unless you are willing to sit down and really work on self-teaching it in the next month, in essence covering two years worth of materials in 4/5 weeks...
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    Warwick Chemistry has very strong links with the chemical industry and other employers. Its program not only offers the traditional inorganic, organic, and physical chemistry but spans much wider. For example polymer science at warwick is one of the best places in Europe. Warwick graduates are heavily sought after by top employers.

    Obviously it is your choice where to study, but Warwick is for sure an excellent place to be.



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    (Original post by Stiff Little Fingers)
    You'd be best off picking the course with the best job prospects financially - most figures I can find are total graduates rather than of that department, so ask from each department what percentage end up in work with 6 months of graduating to give yourself a decent idea of which one has the best prospects.

    As for physics - I'd say that not having done it at a-level would be a drawback unless you are willing to sit down and really work on self-teaching it in the next month, in essence covering two years worth of materials in 4/5 weeks...
    I humbly disagree with the section in bold. You wouldn't have to go through the entire syllabus for Physics. The ideas of momentum transfer in elastic and inelastic collisions, the basic ideas of quantum physics (photoelectric effect, the idea of discrete energy levels and the origins of spectral lines) are all that was called upon in the first year of Chemistry.

    Having said that, lecturers never teach on the assumption that everyone knows everything from A Level physics. There are several students in my class that didnt study physics at A level and are doing fine.

    If you are ever in doubt a lecturer will always sit down and teach/explain something.

    If you need the extra help in Physics, this forum and I personally am willing to help you. All you need is to put up a thread or drop me a PM.

    PS : I am currently studying Chemistry at Imperial
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    (Original post by Ari Ben Canaan)
    I humbly disagree with the section in bold. You wouldn't have to go through the entire syllabus for Physics. The ideas of momentum transfer in elastic and inelastic collisions, the basic ideas of quantum physics (photoelectric effect, the idea of discrete energy levels and the origins of spectral lines) are all that was called upon in the first year of Chemistry.

    Having said that, lecturers never teach on the assumption that everyone knows everything from A Level physics. There are several students in my class that didnt study physics at A level and are doing fine.

    If you are ever in doubt a lecturer will always sit down and teach/explain something.

    If you need the extra help in Physics, this forum and I personally am willing to help you. All you need is to put up a thread or drop me a PM.

    PS : I am currently studying Chemistry at Imperial
    Thanks, all of you, for the advice. Ari Ben Canaan, thank you for that very kind offer.
    • TSR Support Team
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    (Original post by Ari Ben Canaan)
    I humbly disagree with the section in bold. You wouldn't have to go through the entire syllabus for Physics. The ideas of momentum transfer in elastic and inelastic collisions, the basic ideas of quantum physics (photoelectric effect, the idea of discrete energy levels and the origins of spectral lines) are all that was called upon in the first year of Chemistry.

    Having said that, lecturers never teach on the assumption that everyone knows everything from A Level physics. There are several students in my class that didnt study physics at A level and are doing fine.

    If you are ever in doubt a lecturer will always sit down and teach/explain something.

    If you need the extra help in Physics, this forum and I personally am willing to help you. All you need is to put up a thread or drop me a PM.

    PS : I am currently studying Chemistry at Imperial
    Apologies for the delay in responding. Yep, sorry I thought they were considering doing Physics at uni , but nah, Chemistry doesn't call upon much as you've said, I didn't do physics at a-level and I'm getting on fine with the stuff in a chem degree.
 
 
 
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