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    Hey,

    I'm currently in my AS year taking English lit. History, art, sports studies (but let's not mention that) and general studies (which is also a joke). I swear that history is just the hardest thing I've EVER had to do. I made little progress until about 3 weeks ago. I'm taking AQA and it's the Crusades and Britain 1929-51. So the most points I ever got in those essay questions was 13/15 which technically spells a B. And I'm fine with that, but throughout the entirety of this year, I've been getting 11/15 which is a C. I need BBB to get into any of my chosen courses and history is going to ruin that completely.
    So here's my question (yeah, sorry I'm taking so long) out of politics and philosophy, which is one easier? And to be more specific, which one involves less information to absorb? I'm looking to complete both the AS course as well as the A2 course in my A2 year. I'm not too dull and concepts are easy enough to grasp (unless it's physics or maths) and I have no problem with debateing, essay writing and ideas. So if anybody could help, feel free to give me all the information you can throw at me.

    -Terr
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    I currently do AQA AS Government & Politics and am intending to drop it next year because I'm taking a new AS subject next year.

    I don't do Philosophy, so I can't really give you a very good comparison of the two. However, I find Government & Politics easy and interesting. Main topics covered include the advantages and disadvantages of various electoral systems, different ideologies and history of the labour, tory and libdem parties and their structure, the parliament, the cabinet, the prime minister and the European Union. If you are into politics, you should find these topics easy. Exam questions are quite straightforward and easy. i.e. "The House of Commons has the most influence in the Houses of Parliament. Discuss"

    My teacher spends the first 5 minutes of each lesson discussing the current political news, which is rather fun.

    I can't say which of the two is better, but I give Gov&Pol a thumbs up.
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    I do both- so I feel I'm quite well placed to answer this.

    If you're really willing to throw yourself into it, Philosophy is by far the more interesting of the two subjects. It can seem difficult but if as you say you grasp concepts quickly, you'll soon pick it up- and once you've got to the stage where you understand how the various arguments are formed, how to structure a philosophical essay, the rest of the course (and indeed the A2 course) will come very easy to you and will actually be really enjoyable. You get to know how the philosophers think, so new concepts that they put forward usually make sense and fit nicely into what you already knew of them.

    Government and Politics is (in my opinion) a lot less fun. Perhaps I'm biased because I don't enjoy it as much, but it's more about the learning and everything that needs to be learnt is a little dull. The AS stuff is easy enough to learn and with time you'd probably find it pretty easy to get a good AS grade. A2 is a little harder (although perhaps it depends on which route you take- I did Political Ideologies), and is more theoretical. For the last unit you need to have kept up-to-date, and your historical knowledge may help because recent British history (with regards to politics) is vital knowledge to be able to confidently talk of each of the major British parties. Further to that, it's important to keep afloat of all the political goings on, particularly with Labour, Liberals & Tories. If you're going to be very busy with your subjects and don't think you'd have the time to be looking in-depth at the news every week, maybe it wouldn't be wise.

    I don't think it's hard to see that I prefer Philosophy, so sorry about the bias that's probably come through!
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    Erm... I do Govt and Politics and Religious Studies (which I'd imagine is different from Philosophy, but...) I'm absolutely in love with Politics, but I think that, on balance, RS (half of which is Philosophy, and half Ethics) is far easier, and you can sort of just reason your way through the exam, whereas you need far more information for Politics. If it's any indication, I actually do RS as an extra, once a week....

    Hope this was helpful - sorry I don't do Philosophy, but hope that RS is close enough!
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    (Original post by sixthformer18)
    I currently do AQA AS Government & Politics and am intending to drop it next year because I'm taking a new AS subject next year.
    Should stick with it, it is a lot more interesting at A2. Synoptic paper rules.
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    (Original post by JohnStuartMill)
    Should stick with it, it is a lot more interesting at A2. Synoptic paper rules.
    I know. But American Politics doesn't interest me.

    Wish A2 covered European Union.

    I'm dropping it because my AS exams look promising.

    I'm taking AS Critical Thinking next year, because I'm uber-poor in that area.
 
 
 

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