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    So I'm sure this question has been asked a million times, but I was just wondering if anyone had any advice I applied for Chemistry at Uni last year but as the year passed I decided that I wanted to work in healthcare - and so withdrew my application for Chemistry. I just got my A Level Results: Maths: A*, FMaths: A*, Chemistry: A*, Physics: A. I also got 2960 in my UKCAT which is an average of 740. If I apply for medicine will I be at a major disadvantage because I don't have Biology?! Because it is only fairly recently that my career plans have changed I haven't got any experience yet, but I have thought long and hard about it and I'm 99.9% sure that this is something I want to do. I just need some experience for that last 0.1% and to help me decide between Nursing and medicine. I've applied for a few care assistant jobs locally and just waiting to hear back. SO my major questions are: Is it going to disadvantage my application to nursing if my PS looks like I've applied to medicine? Is there a chance that a nursing course won't want me because my grades are too high? I have other questions which I will post below as a reply because my enter button isn't working (just in this box for some reason - it works in word and everywhere else on the internet) hence the very long paragraph!
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    So the Questions were:

    I don’t have Biology, is this likely to be an issue if I’m applying for medicine?
    Could I get rejected for nursing because my grades are too high?
    Will a nursing course consider me if my Personal Statement looks geared towards medicine?

    Really I need to apply to a few of each (Nursing and Medicine) because even if I secure a job for September I will only of been working for a few weeks before the October deadline – not really long enough for me to make a sensible informed decision! If I think of any other questions I’ll post below x
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    You will need to check the requirements for individual unis for medicine - a handy page is here. There is certainly a selection of unis that will consider your application without biology seeing as you have physics.

    I know very little about nursing applications, but i suspect applying to both nursing and medicine might pose a little difficulty. Certainly, i would not compromise a personal statement aimed at medicine with mention of any other courses.
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    Thanks I think I will have to spend a long time on my Personal Statement to get it right so that both courses might be interested in me! A lot of people have said to me that because my A level results are high I can basically choose where I go (provided I meet the entry requirements in terms of biology etc.) but I don't think that's going to be true for medicine even though my grades are high... am I right?
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    (Original post by KimbyJayne)
    Thanks I think I will have to spend a long time on my Personal Statement to get it right so that both courses might be interested in me!
    Okay... like i said, i don't know anything really about nursing, so that might be possible. But just to emphasise, a lot of med schools attach a lot of weight to what is said in the PS - it needs to cover your work experience and what you learned and why you want to be a doctor and how you are suited (the personal statement helpers on here are very good i hear) - there is very little scope for compromising on that if you are serious about trying to get into medicine. If that happens to be what nursing wants to hear too then great. If not... it will be very difficult.

    Of course, by splitting your applications you are also limiting the number of places you're applying for each. Do you really want to reduce your chance of getting in to medicine by 25% by including an extra nursing course? Or vice versa?

    Ideally, you'd be decided by the time applications come around.

    A lot of people have said to me that because my A level results are high I can basically choose where I go (provided I meet the entry requirements in terms of biology etc.) but I don't think that's going to be true for medicine even though my grades are high... am I right?
    You'd be right yes. There are a number of medicine application profiles here - you will see people (like myself, in fact) who had very high grades who still got lots of (or even solely) rejections. The work experience/volunteering, other aptitude tests and interviews are all very important. I consider myself very fortunate to get the offer i did in hindsight.

    And lets be clear - its not like nursing applications are a walk in the park either. I think.
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    Personally I wouldn't apply to both. Try and get some medical w/e.

    The link below shows how medical schools use A-levels and what they want. Most want biology, some at AS.

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki...l_Requirements
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    I think the work experience will be the deciding factor. I was deciding between law and medicine and after my medical work experience I just fell for the profession. Ideally try and get work experience in hospital because then you can see what nurses and doctors do, so can decide between the two better.

    In terms of the application if you wish to apply for medicine you really need to go for it and not compromise it by mentioning other courses and not showing a 100% commitment. Your grades are excellent (congrats btw) and a lot (not sure how many) medical schools will consider you. As with all medical applications be tactical. Some (I think St. Andrews...) prefer post A-level applicants and as your grades are high they might be worth a look. But do your research and you should be fine without biology.

    I have no idea about nursing applications, sorry
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    Thanks All this advice is really helping! Ultimately the experience will make me jump one way or another, just got to find some now! If I apply for medicine this year then I can always take a second gap year and then do nursing if it doesn't work out
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    Ultimately it comes down to: do you want to be a nurse or a doctor? They're two very different careers. If you can't answer that question, do some more research and work experience and you'll probably have a clear preference after that. Please do not apply to both, you won't get into either.

    Oh and nursing schools are not going to reject you because your grades are too high! They will however reject you if your personal statement doesn't show that you are wholly committed to becoming a nurse. For nursing applications, once you've met the minimum grades it's all down to your personal statement and interview.

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    You could also study AS Biology alongside your work experience which will open up more choices for you. Another degree option is Pharmacy, especially given your interest in chemistry.
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    (Original post by KimbyJayne)
    So I'm sure this question has been asked a million times, but I was just wondering if anyone had any advice I applied for Chemistry at Uni last year but as the year passed I decided that I wanted to work in healthcare - and so withdrew my application for Chemistry. I just got my A Level Results: Maths: A*, FMaths: A*, Chemistry: A*, Physics: A. I also got 2960 in my UKCAT which is an average of 740. If I apply for medicine will I be at a major disadvantage because I don't have Biology?! Because it is only fairly recently that my career plans have changed I haven't got any experience yet, but I have thought long and hard about it and I'm 99.9% sure that this is something I want to do. I just need some experience for that last 0.1% and to help me decide between Nursing and medicine. I've applied for a few care assistant jobs locally and just waiting to hear back. SO my major questions are: Is it going to disadvantage my application to nursing if my PS looks like I've applied to medicine? Is there a chance that a nursing course won't want me because my grades are too high? I have other questions which I will post below as a reply because my enter button isn't working (just in this box for some reason - it works in word and everywhere else on the internet) hence the very long paragraph!
    whilst some unis say that they don't want biology, unofficially you're hamstrung if you don't have it- they prefer people that do by a long way.You could take nursing and THEN medicine (GEP), or take nursing and see if you can convert to medicine.
    Plus some med schools don't allow maths and further maths as two different subjects.
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    (Original post by FutureHeartSurg)
    whilst some unis say that they don't want biology, unofficially you're hamstrung if you don't have it- they prefer people that do by a long way.
    Source.
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    (Original post by FutureHeartSurg)
    whilst some unis say that they don't want biology, unofficially you're hamstrung if you don't have it- they prefer people that do by a long way.You could take nursing and THEN medicine (GEP), or take nursing and see if you can convert to medicine.
    Plus some med schools don't allow maths and further maths as two different subjects.
    I am considering doing an AS in Biology, but not sure whether I will get much support from my school :/ The fact that unis don't count Maths and FMaths as 2 alevels is regardless because I have 4 Alevels and they only need three, so if u ignore Fmaths I have 3.
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    (Original post by KimbyJayne)
    I am considering doing an AS in Biology, but not sure whether I will get much support from my school :/ The fact that unis don't count Maths and FMaths as 2 alevels is regardless because I have 4 Alevels and they only need three, so if u ignore Fmaths I have 3.
    you can do it in your own time and take the exam in a private centre. And yeah i know that, just pointing it out
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    (Original post by KimbyJayne)
    So I'm sure this question has been asked a million times, but I was just wondering if anyone had any advice I applied for Chemistry at Uni last year but as the year passed I decided that I wanted to work in healthcare - and so withdrew my application for Chemistry. I just got my A Level Results: Maths: A*, FMaths: A*, Chemistry: A*, Physics: A. I also got 2960 in my UKCAT which is an average of 740. If I apply for medicine will I be at a major disadvantage because I don't have Biology?! Because it is only fairly recently that my career plans have changed I haven't got any experience yet, but I have thought long and hard about it and I'm 99.9% sure that this is something I want to do. I just need some experience for that last 0.1% and to help me decide between Nursing and medicine. I've applied for a few care assistant jobs locally and just waiting to hear back. SO my major questions are: Is it going to disadvantage my application to nursing if my PS looks like I've applied to medicine? Is there a chance that a nursing course won't want me because my grades are too high? I have other questions which I will post below as a reply because my enter button isn't working (just in this box for some reason - it works in word and everywhere else on the internet) hence the very long paragraph!

    Hi

    As a nurse turned medical student I hope you don't mind me commenting.

    Firstly there are several med schools that will consider you without biology, but doing an AS in the meantime is bound to improve your application as well as get you up to speed for the course as many other students will have alevel baseline knowledge.

    I definitely would NOT recommend trying to aim your personal statement at both nursing and medicine. Medical schools are looking for 100% commitment to the profession, and part of that is questioning why you didn't choose other healthcare/science careers. Any mention of nursing could effect your chances of being taken seriously as a future medic.

    Nursing and medicine are two extremely different career paths, it would be like trying to apply for an English degree and a Chemistry degree with the same personal statement. Nursing is essentially a caring profession. There is much opportunity now for nurses to gain many skills, but the basic foundations of nursing are caring for the patient. Medicine is diagnosis, investigation and treatment plan, the overall management of the patient's treatment. An idea is to think about which speciality/skills you would like to gain in your career, this may guide you a little in selecting your career path.

    Work experience is one of the best ways to find out which career is best for you, I would recommend shadowing staff nurses on a ward as opposed to specialist nurses which have been in the profession for many years, this will help you to see what the day to day job in nursing is about. You will also see the junior doctors on the ward, and could ask to also shadow them, most hospitals will allow this if you contact either the ward manager or the student liaison officer.

    Sorry for the long post, congratulations on your excellent results!
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    (Original post by SarahGummer)
    Hi

    As a nurse turned medical student I hope you don't mind me commenting.

    Firstly there are several med schools that will consider you without biology, but doing an AS in the meantime is bound to improve your application as well as get you up to speed for the course as many other students will have alevel baseline knowledge.

    I definitely would NOT recommend trying to aim your personal statement at both nursing and medicine. Medical schools are looking for 100% commitment to the profession, and part of that is questioning why you didn't choose other healthcare/science careers. Any mention of nursing could effect your chances of being taken seriously as a future medic.

    Nursing and medicine are two extremely different career paths, it would be like trying to apply for an English degree and a Chemistry degree with the same personal statement. Nursing is essentially a caring profession. There is much opportunity now for nurses to gain many skills, but the basic foundations of nursing are caring for the patient. Medicine is diagnosis, investigation and treatment plan, the overall management of the patient's treatment. An idea is to think about which speciality/skills you would like to gain in your career, this may guide you a little in selecting your career path.

    Work experience is one of the best ways to find out which career is best for you, I would recommend shadowing staff nurses on a ward as opposed to specialist nurses which have been in the profession for many years, this will help you to see what the day to day job in nursing is about. You will also see the junior doctors on the ward, and could ask to also shadow them, most hospitals will allow this if you contact either the ward manager or the student liaison officer.

    Sorry for the long post, congratulations on your excellent results!
    WOW.... of course I don't mind!!! Thanks so much for the advice! You've given me a lot to think about.. I have got a job as a care assistant at a nursing home now, so I'm looking forward to starting that soon and the experience will help me decide I'm also going to look into doing some volunteering at a local hospital on the days when I'm not working at the home so that I can see what the different roles entail. So I'm assuming u studied a nursing degree and then went on to study medicine at a later date?
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    (Original post by KimbyJayne)
    WOW.... of course I don't mind!!! Thanks so much for the advice! You've given me a lot to think about.. I have got a job as a care assistant at a nursing home now, so I'm looking forward to starting that soon and the experience will help me decide I'm also going to look into doing some volunteering at a local hospital on the days when I'm not working at the home so that I can see what the different roles entail. So I'm assuming u studied a nursing degree and then went on to study medicine at a later date?

    I did the DipHE in Adult Nursing (it's basically just less than a degree) when I was 17-20. Mostly because I wasn't sure what I wanted to do and i'd chosen all the wrong a levels. I wanted to do medicine but at the time didn't have the grades. Nursing is challenging but I would say on the most part isn't a profession for academics. This isn't the case 100% of the time, and it is your decision completely but most nurses who are specialists/senior nurses that I tell I am going to medical school say if they could go back they would do the same.

    I've worked as a specialist nurse and been qualified for almost 4 years now. I've seen the roles different types of nurses do and what medics do and ultimately I think medicine fits me far better. You need to think about the kind of person you are and the skills you have and how they will fit into a career. If you want to be academically challenged nursing can provide that, but not until later in your career and it certainly isn't a main part of the job.
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    (Original post by SarahGummer)

    I've worked as a specialist nurse and been qualified for almost 4 years now. I've seen the roles different types of nurses do and what medics do and ultimately I think medicine fits me far better. You need to think about the kind of person you are and the skills you have and how they will fit into a career. If you want to be academically challenged nursing can provide that, but not until later in your career and it certainly isn't a main part of the job.
    It's really interesting to hear that senior nurses say that they would of wanted to go back to medical school if they did it now! Over the last few days i have had a lot of thought about which career path to follow and i have (almost) settled on medicine.

    I have always thought that the type of nursing i wanted to do was verging on a doctors role, the top end of nursing i suppose... However now i have my grades I hope that i have
    a chance of getting into medical school so my viewpoint changed. If as a nurse i want to do thedoctory procedures then why not just become a doctor?

    I hope that if i apply for medicine this year then i will not have any reason to have regrets in the future as if i decide nursing is for me then i can reapply the year after.
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    (Original post by KimbyJayne)
    It's really interesting to hear that senior nurses say that they would of wanted to go back to medical school if they did it now! Over the last few days i have had a lot of thought about which career path to follow and i have (almost) settled on medicine.

    I have always thought that the type of nursing i wanted to do was verging on a doctors role, the top end of nursing i suppose... However now i have my grades I hope that i have
    a chance of getting into medical school so my viewpoint changed. If as a nurse i want to do thedoctory procedures then why not just become a doctor?

    I hope that if i apply for medicine this year then i will not have any reason to have regrets in the future as if i decide nursing is for me then i can reapply the year after.
    good luck
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    Most universities don't require a specific subject for nursing. However, most would prefer you to have A levels in Biology/Human Biology, Chemistry, Psychology, Physical Education and Sociology. The top nursing schools will however, prefer you to have have Bio/Human Bio. Once you've met the minimum entry, the university will assess you based on how well you did during your interview and your personal statement. You could study for a nursing degree and study medicine (GEM) straight after nursing.

    -Nursing Student here


    Good luck!


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