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    Hi everyone!

    I'm hoping to do my first bit of travelling next year and I think I'd like to go to Canada. Has anyone been, who's willing to tell me about their experience, and what it's like over there?

    Thanks.
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    It's amazing. I was there for my Gap year and came back in 2010.

    The weather is so varied, Winter can get to minus 40 celcius, summer plus 30 celcius.

    It really depends if you wanted to go to a particular part or you want to travel the whole Country?

    My favourite city is probably Calgary, Alberta. It's close to the rockys - Banff and Lake Louise (AMAZING PLACES) and only a 2.5 hour drive to Edmonton.

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    I've been to Montreal several times. It's a lovely city.


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    (Original post by Beccster)
    It's amazing. I was there for my Gap year and came back in 2010.

    The weather is so varied, Winter can get to minus 40 celcius, summer plus 30 celcius.

    It really depends if you wanted to go to a particular part or you want to travel the whole Country?

    My favourite city is probably Calgary, Alberta. It's close to the rockys - Banff and Lake Louise (AMAZING PLACES) and only a 2.5 hour drive to Edmonton.


    Well I'm sort of asking here to ask for suggestions of where I should go, gotta admit I'm not much of a city girl so though I'd go for a day trip, I'd rather travel around the more rural bits, visit a few ski resorts. How long did you go for, and did you find work? I was looking at going with a travel group like Oyster for my first travelling experience as they provide support and find you a job.


    (Original post by Coffeetime)
    I've been to Montreal several times. It's a lovely city.


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    Any sights/activities you'd recommend?
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    (Original post by Jade M)
    Any sights/activities you'd recommend?
    The area of Old Montreal is really nice.
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    I've been living on Vancouver Island, BC, for almost 2 years now. The Island is an awesome place to visit, could easily spend a month here just travelling around and seeing everything! Great winter/summer climate, lots to do, beautiful scenery (lakes, mountains, ocean).
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    (Original post by Coffeetime)
    The area of Old Montreal is really nice.
    Ooh, okay  I just looked it up on Tripadvisor, it looks like a must see! Did you go to any of the galleries when you were there?


    (Original post by gemini89)
    I've been living on Vancouver Island, BC, for almost 2 years now. The Island is an awesome place to visit, could easily spend a month here just travelling around and seeing everything! Great winter/summer climate, lots to do, beautiful scenery (lakes, mountains, ocean).
    Hi gemini, thanks for the info As I said I'd be looking to stay for a couple of months so anything you could tell me about the lifestyle differences, cost of living etc. would be a great help. Did you find it easy to get a job there?
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    (Original post by Jade M)
    Ooh, okay  I just looked it up on Tripadvisor, it looks like a must see! Did you go to any of the galleries when you were there?
    No. Unfortunately not. The last time I went, my friends were more interested in drinking. I'd like to go back, but I live further away from it now.



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    In very general terms, west is best for scenery, east for culture.

    Vieux Quebec knocks Vieux Montreal out of the water. Both Quebec and Montreal should be visited- great food, interesting culture, nice architecture, lots of history. Quebec is more historical and picturesque (very touristy) whereas Montreal is a much bigger, more dynamic city. You can eat very well in both without spending much money.

    West is the place to go for mountains, beautiful (and rainy!) coastlines, seeing bears, killer whales and other wildlife (the east has good whale watching too). The cities are nice, great places to live but nothing spectacular as tourist destinations. The west is really best for its outdoors. The Rockies are nice, as is the coast of northern BC. Vancouver Island is also worth visiting.

    I've heard great things about Newfoundland too, although combining that with Quebec, Alberta and BC might be tricky. Flying in Canada is not cheap, although accommodation and food costs are generally much lower than in the UK.
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    (Original post by Jade M)
    Hi everyone!

    I'm hoping to do my first bit of travelling next year and I think I'd like to go to Canada. Has anyone been, who's willing to tell me about their experience, and what it's like over there?

    Thanks.
    I love it so much I want to move there!!

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    (Original post by standreams)
    In very general terms, west is best for scenery, east for culture.

    Vieux Quebec knocks Vieux Montreal out of the water. Both Quebec and Montreal should be visited- great food, interesting culture, nice architecture, lots of history. Quebec is more historical and picturesque (very touristy) whereas Montreal is a much bigger, more dynamic city. You can eat very well in both without spending much money.

    West is the place to go for mountains, beautiful (and rainy!) coastlines, seeing bears, killer whales and other wildlife (the east has good whale watching too). The cities are nice, great places to live but nothing spectacular as tourist destinations. The west is really best for its outdoors. The Rockies are nice, as is the coast of northern BC. Vancouver Island is also worth visiting.

    I've heard great things about Newfoundland too, although combining that with Quebec, Alberta and BC might be tricky. Flying in Canada is not cheap, although accommodation and food costs are generally much lower than in the UK.

    That's a huge help, thank you
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    (Original post by Jade M)
    Ooh, okay  I just looked it up on Tripadvisor, it looks like a must see! Did you go to any of the galleries when you were there?




    Hi gemini, thanks for the info As I said I'd be looking to stay for a couple of months so anything you could tell me about the lifestyle differences, cost of living etc. would be a great help. Did you find it easy to get a job there?
    Cost of living - in general, a little more expensive than the UK. Some things like petrol and housing cost less, but food and clothing cost more. I find eating out at restaurants/cafes especially expensive.

    Getting a job where I live isn't amazingly easy (I do seasonal work) as it's a relatively small town of 70,000. If you're planning to go to the usual destinations such as Vancouver or Toronto, there is definitely work available for people arriving on IEC visas, just don't expect to walk into a job on your first day!
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    (Original post by Jade M)
    Ooh, okay  I just looked it up on Tripadvisor, it looks like a must see! Did you go to any of the galleries when you were there?




    Hi gemini, thanks for the info As I said I'd be looking to stay for a couple of months so anything you could tell me about the lifestyle differences, cost of living etc. would be a great help. Did you find it easy to get a job there?
    Cost of living - in general, a little more expensive than the UK. Some things like petrol cost less, but food and clothing costs more. I find eating out at restaurants/cafes especially expensive.

    Getting a job where I live isn't amazingly easy (I do seasonal work) as it's a relatively small town of 70,000. If you're planning to go to the usual destinations such as Vancouver or Toronto, there is definitely work available for people arriving on IEC visas, just don't expect to walk into a job on your first day!

    (Original post by standreams)
    Flying in Canada is not cheap, although accommodation and food costs are generally much lower than in the UK.
    I want to know where you have found this low cost food!!
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    (Original post by gemini89)
    Cost of living - in general, a little more expensive than the UK. Some things like petrol cost less, but food and clothing costs more. I find eating out at restaurants/cafes especially expensive.

    Getting a job where I live isn't amazingly easy (I do seasonal work) as it's a relatively small town of 70,000. If you're planning to go to the usual destinations such as Vancouver or Toronto, there is definitely work available for people arriving on IEC visas, just don't expect to walk into a job on your first day!



    I want to know where you have found this low cost food!!
    When I lived there, I bought my food at Metro and/or Dollarama and/or the market. They were cheaper than UK equivalents. I know the £ has gone down against the $ since then but if you are earning a $ salary that shouldn't be an issue (and tourists are unlikely to do much grocery shopping anyway). Relative to income, costs are still lower in Canada.

    Also, eating out has always been cheaper in Canada than the UK, even when you factor in tax and tip. Cost of living indices tend to reflect this. I'm not sure where you are eating in Canada/where you ate in the UK but you should be able to go out for dinner in Canada for less than the UK equivalent. Obviously, if you are living in a ski resort or tourist town that won't necessarily be the case. I know I have had amazing meals in Quebec, Alberta and BC for about two thirds of what I'd have paid in the UK for the same.

    I agree clothing is much more expensive.
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    (Original post by standreams)
    When I lived there, I bought my food at Metro and/or Dollarama and/or the market. They were cheaper than UK equivalents. I know the £ has gone down against the $ since then but if you are earning a $ salary that shouldn't be an issue (and tourists are unlikely to do much grocery shopping anyway). Relative to income, costs are still lower in Canada.

    Also, eating out has always been cheaper in Canada than the UK, even when you factor in tax and tip. Cost of living indices tend to reflect this. I'm not sure where you are eating in Canada/where you ate in the UK but you should be able to go out for dinner in Canada for less than the UK equivalent. Obviously, if you are living in a ski resort or tourist town that won't necessarily be the case. I know I have had amazing meals in Quebec, Alberta and BC for about two thirds of what I'd have paid in the UK for the same.

    I agree clothing is much more expensive.
    I think we'll have to agree to disagree to be honest! Canada is a huge place so there is going to be some differences across the shop, and I can only speak for where I currently live (Vancouver Island) and other places in the provinces I have visited for shorter periods. It also depends on where you've been living in the UK too - I lived in Brighton for years before I came to Canada and I could eat out there very well for fairly low cost. There isn't anywhere near where I live that serves a main course meal for lower than about $16 before tax and tip - and this isn't a resort town so that unfourtantely is not the explanation.

    One thing I hope we can agree on though is that alcohol is pretty darn expensive, along with other 'luxury' items such as cheese! My advice to anyone moving from the UK who likes cheese....eat it while you can I miss Tescos/Sainsburys et al where you could pick up a decent block of cheddar for £2 (30% of one hour of minimum wage work), and a similar one here would be nearer $8 (80% of one hour of minimum wage work). It's funny, every Brit I meet always brings up the cheese thing, so I had to mention it

    To the original poster of the thread, for another perspective you may find these blogs interesting - http://raiderrachel.blogspot.co.uk/2...on-budget.html and http://www.ourcanadianadventure.co.uk/ to give you more of an idea of what to expect!
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    (Original post by gemini89)
    I think we'll have to agree to disagree to be honest! Canada is a huge place so there is going to be some differences across the shop, and I can only speak for where I currently live (Vancouver Island) and other places in the provinces I have visited for shorter periods. It also depends on where you've been living in the UK too - I lived in Brighton for years before I came to Canada and I could eat out there very well for fairly low cost. There isn't anywhere near where I live that serves a main course meal for lower than about $16 before tax and tip - and this isn't a resort town so that unfourtantely is not the explanation.

    One thing I hope we can agree on though is that alcohol is pretty darn expensive, along with other 'luxury' items such as cheese! My advice to anyone moving from the UK who likes cheese....eat it while you can I miss Tescos/Sainsburys et al where you could pick up a decent block of cheddar for £2 (30% of one hour of minimum wage work), and a similar one here would be nearer $8 (80% of one hour of minimum wage work). It's funny, every Brit I meet always brings up the cheese thing, so I had to mention it

    To the original poster of the thread, for another perspective you may find these blogs interesting - http://raiderrachel.blogspot.co.uk/2...on-budget.html and http://www.ourcanadianadventure.co.uk/ to give you more of an idea of what to expect!
    You are there now and I'm not, so your advice is more current. Although I would say perhaps Vancouver Island is a bit more expensive due to being an island and generally "desirable" place (I know housing costs way more in Victoria than in say Quebec.)

    I do recall cheese being expensive, and generally not great. Even in Quebec, which is very 'foodie' oriented, supermarket cheese was pretty unimpressive. You had to go to the farmers' market for good stuff, and that did cost money. I'm not a huge drinker but I remember being unimpressed with the quality of mainstream beer- there is some good stuff but you have to pay for it.

    One great thing about Quebec is that for a $2 or $3 supplement you can/could add a starter and/or dessert to your main...maybe that's why I remember it being cheap, or at least, good value. Eating in Quebec is a wonderful experience- French quality, North American quantity!

    Out of curiosity, where on the island are you? I only ever made it to Victoria but have heard great things about the rest of the place- not so much the towns but the scenery. And the wonderful Nanaimo bars- yum!
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    (Original post by standreams)
    You are there now and I'm not, so your advice is more current. Although I would say perhaps Vancouver Island is a bit more expensive due to being an island and generally "desirable" place (I know housing costs way more in Victoria than in say Quebec.)

    I do recall cheese being expensive, and generally not great. Even in Quebec, which is very 'foodie' oriented, supermarket cheese was pretty unimpressive. You had to go to the farmers' market for good stuff, and that did cost money. I'm not a huge drinker but I remember being unimpressed with the quality of mainstream beer- there is some good stuff but you have to pay for it.

    One great thing about Quebec is that for a $2 or $3 supplement you can/could add a starter and/or dessert to your main...maybe that's why I remember it being cheap, or at least, good value. Eating in Quebec is a wonderful experience- French quality, North American quantity!

    Out of curiosity, where on the island are you? I only ever made it to Victoria but have heard great things about the rest of the place- not so much the towns but the scenery. And the wonderful Nanaimo bars- yum!

    Yeah, the cheese isn't even that good - it's hard to find a cheddar that is not bright orange to start with! Yuck. The $2/3 supplement thing sounds great, I'm jealous!

    I live in the Comox Valley, 'mid island' - it's about 3 hours to Victoria from here. It is a truly amazing place to live if you like the outdoors; there's so much to do and so much variation (ocean, lakes, wilderness with huge trees, mountains). In the winter, I can drive 30 minutes away and go snowboarding, and then come home to 10 degree weather and go play some golf or take a walk on the beach. In the spring/summer/autumn, I go camping (for free, I will add!) almost every weekend, and then hike, canoe, fish, swim etc. Pretty nice lifestyle I must say. We moved here for one ski season and now I'm on my 3rd and I have applied for residency. Will be leaving the Island next Spring though!
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    Hey Gemini, did you get residency and how are you finding living there if so? I'm thinking about making the move in a few years to BC
 
 
 
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