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    I was diagnosed with Moderate Clinical Depression a couple weeks before my AS exams. The depression wasn't caused by the stress of revision/exams, it was something I had been living with for several years and it was my friends who urged me to go to a doctor.

    I feel like my depression has had an affect on my grades because when I was younger (doing 11+) I had great motivation. I got into an amazing private school with full scholarship. Then when certain events occurred (the root of my depression) I noticed the slip in grades, the lack of motivation, antisocial behaviour etc.

    I didn't have my friends when the events happened (I didn't know them) so I somehow tried to cope with it.

    Now my AS level results came and I got an ADD (A for maths, D for Physics/Biology)

    I want to do engineering but with these grades my predicted would be at the highest an A*CC. I know I can do better, the medication I have been taking has been helping (it takes sometime to work) and I feel more motivated but my grades are whats stopping me.

    Do universities let you in with **** grades knowing that you've had a tough time ?

    Should I consider a foundation year or rely on Adjustment ?
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    well now it's after your exams it might be hard to let the universities know you are struggling with mental health issues. it's usually best if you tell your school/college before exams, so they can either give you extra time (probably not in mental health cases) or help in another way. do the universities you want to apply for have context entry requirements? usually these are lower and mostly for mature students but you could ask anyway. probably the best thing to do would be to tell your school so they can put in a word somewhere on the ucas application (don't know where or how detailed it would be). I just picked this up from my school so sorry it's not more specific to mental health
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    Would you consider re-taking some AS modules alongside your A level modules? I understand that this would mean a heavier workload, but it would help boost your grade and may convince your teachers to give you higher predicted grades. Is there any chance that you could persuade your teachers to give you higher predicted grades? Possibly by explaining that your mental health issues affected your AS grades, but now you feel more able to achieve higher grades.

    It's unlikely that top universities will give you an offer with predicted grades of A*CC, but you might be able to get some offers from ABB courses. If you ask your teachers, they will mention your mental health problems in their teacher/tutor reference, where they can explain that this affected your AS grades and predictions, but now you are more stable and able to deal with the illness and are on track for better grades. Declaring the fact that you are re-taking some modules (if you decide to) may also sway the universities in your favour.

    Would you consider taking a gap year? That way you could achieve higher grades this year than your predicted grades and apply with your grades confirmed.
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    I had a pretty similar problem, clinical depression and anxiety really go in the way of my studies. I missed my uni offer by two grades and was accepted onto my course anyway because they knew about my mental health problems. I don't know if that's something that generally happens, or if they were just a lot more understanding. If you want any advice or just to talk about things, feel free to PM me, I've been through it too
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    I would consider taking a gap year. You can resit them alongside and if you already have the grades by the end of your two years, but no offer (from the university you want and can end up), you should try to spend a year in the industry (I think there are some shemes for engineers). In fact there are plenty of useful things - beside getting stable and healthy - you can do helping you to become an engineer during a gap year. (Languages, industrial experience, programming, ...)
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    Let your college/sixth form know so it can be mentioned on your reference to university and look at modules you could resit. Alternatively you could do three years at A Level - continue with maths at A2 next year and resit physics/biology, or pick up other AS Levels if you wanted. If that's not an option I'd say make your institution aware of your situation (get doctor's notes/prescription etc as evidence if necessary) and look at modules you can resit next summer to boost your other grades best of luck!
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    You should speak to your school/college and let them know. They may be able to predict you better grades and mention it in your reference. Unis tend to be sympathetic to circumstances like yours. Hopefully your medication will help you get back your motivation, allowing you to improve your grades in retakes next year.
 
 
 
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