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Bought a car. Found out it's been in an accident. Watch

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    I'll make this as brief as poss:

    • Bought my first car off autotrader
    • Guy told me it was 'great little car', 'no problems', 'drives well', 'new tyres'
    • Sister saw it - said the back tyre looked old
    • Had trouble moving off in it
    • Took it to garage - back tyre was 14 years old, told it was dangerous. Good tread but tyre wall was splitting.
    • Wasn't moving off properly due to misfire. Leaking petrol. Fixed it for £200 + £40 for new back tyre - thought that was the end of it.
    • 3 days ago starting hearing grinding noise - got very bad today
    • Drove it to another garage - guy opened it up & told me it's previously been in an accident
    • Some things under the bonnet had come loose due to the accident - grinding noise was wires getting chewed up


    Now I need to get it re-wired and I'm taking back to the garage for a check to see what other damage was caused it in the accident to see if it's worth keeping.
    BUT where do i stand with this - I've been sold something under false pretenses. I would never have bought a car if I knew it had been in an accident and if I knew I'd be paying £200+ to fix it up. It seems like stuff keeps going wrong with it ever since I got it but I thought ''oh it's a cheap 2nd hand car, this must be normal'' - but no it's not.

    Will it affect my insurance?
    How did it pass it's MOT?! (he had it's MOT done a month before I bought it)
    I have not had the log book or anything confirming that I own the car and it's been 3 weeks - should I phone the DVLA now?
    I don't trust a word the seller said to me now so how do I find if he sold me a stolen car?

    I know it's mess. You live and learn. But I just need to figure out where I stand and what to do now. Fix the wires and continue driving it or get in touch with the guy and ask for my money back (but I've spent over £200 fixing it so why would I give it back to him and make a loss? And my insurance cancellation date has passed so I don't know how that works).

    Anyone who can answer any of this, I'd be grateful.
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      If it's a private sale, you don't have a leg to stand on, and it's not the seller's problem. Sold as seen, no right to warranty, etc. If you ask for your money back do not be surprised if you're told to bugger off. Did you not run a HPI check?

      To answer your questions:

      Shouldn't necessarily cause insurance to increase
      Dodgy MOTs are easy to get if you know the right people
      Log books can take 6 weeks to come through
      HPI check can determine if the car has been stolen
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      (Original post by somethingbeautiful)
      I'll make this as brief as poss:

      • Bought my first car off autotrader
      • Guy told me it was 'great little car', 'no problems', 'drives well', 'new tyres'
      • Sister saw it - said the back tyre looked old
      • Had trouble moving off in it
      • Took it to garage - back tyre was 14 years old, told it was dangerous. Good tread but tyre wall was splitting.
      • Wasn't moving off properly due to misfire. Leaking petrol. Fixed it for £200 + £40 for new back tyre - thought that was the end of it.
      • 3 days ago starting hearing grinding noise - got very bad today
      • Drove it to another garage - guy opened it up & told me it's previously been in an accident
      • Some things under the bonnet had come loose due to the accident - grinding noise was wires getting chewed up


      Now I need to get it re-wired and I'm taking back to the garage for a check to see what other damage was caused it in the accident to see if it's worth keeping.
      BUT where do i stand with this - I've been sold something under false pretenses. I would never have bought a car if I knew it had been in an accident and if I knew I'd be paying £200+ to fix it up. It seems like stuff keeps going wrong with it ever since I got it but I thought ''oh it's a cheap 2nd hand car, this must be normal'' - but no it's not.

      Will it affect my insurance?
      How did it pass it's MOT?! (he had it's MOT done a month before I bought it)
      I have not had the log book or anything confirming that I own the car and it's been 3 weeks - should I phone the DVLA now?
      I don't trust a word the seller said to me now so how do I find if he sold me a stolen car?

      I know it's mess. You live and learn. But I just need to figure out where I stand and what to do now. Fix the wires and continue driving it or get in touch with the guy and ask for my money back (but I've spent over £200 fixing it so why would I give it back to him and make a loss? And my insurance cancellation date has passed so I don't know how that works).

      Anyone who can answer any of this, I'd be grateful.
      Not entirely sure but I think you do have to tell your insurers about it.
      I'd say its one of those dodgy MOT places, where they do "friend" rates and passes, etc
      It could take longer to be fair, mine came in about 2 weeks.


      I'll be honest I have no idea where you stand to be honest, http://www.whichlegalservice.co.uk/w.../buying-a-car/

      But from what you said, its sounding very dodgy,,,,,,,,who keeps the same tyres for 14 years :lolwut:
      From the looks of the repairs, etc it would seem like something that would be labelled a Cat C if it were a write off.


      I can't make you feel any better about this to be honest
      It must be a pain to have gotten your first car and having to spend even more to repair it, but don't take it out on yourself, live and learn as you said

      What car model is this?

      Just some tips for when you get your next car, if you don't know much about the car, always, always make sure to bring along someone who you trust and knows about cars, checking them out, etc
      Usually a thorough check of the exterior for signs of wear, rust, etc.........interior as well, electrics,etc
      And always opening up the bonnet, checking it out, and checking the exhaust when the engines on and revving as well as a thorough test drive. And a thorough check through the past service history, etc
      Also if it is a proper private seller, they would be selling the car on their door step, and happy for you to go inside to sign the papers over.
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      What FXX said. If its a private sale then you havent got a leg to stand on. MOT doesnt prove anything.

      If its a dealer start quoting Sale of Goods Act.
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      (Original post by Henrikh)
      What FXX said. If its a private sale then you havent got a leg to stand on.
      Unless the advert stated that the car had never been in an accident. In which case, if you can get hold of the advert again, I would be threatening the guy with small claims court.
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        14 year old tyres, thats only two years younger than me. All I can say is daym, live and learn
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        (Original post by Planto)
        Unless the advert stated that the car had never been in an accident. In which case, if you can get hold of the advert again, I would be threatening the guy with small claims court.
        99.9% chance of the advert not mentioning anything to do with accidents.

        Even then you will have to prove a loss. Most independent engineers are not prepared to say that a vehicle has suffered a loss in value (because of an accident) unless its less than three years old.
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        I imagine you will struggle to find cars that haven't had an accident at a reasonable price, even if they aren't recorded. I've bent bits of mine and fixed it up on a number of occasions and I would fully expect previous owners of the thing to have done the same. Anything that has been around for long enough to be sensibly priced will have had its share of bumps.
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        I'd write them a letter stating when you bought the car, and the advert stated that there were no problems and the car had new tyres.

        Go on to say that the description they gave was false, and you deem the car not to have been roadworthy due to the worn tyres and accident damage causing dangerous engine problems, and you want either a full refund including repairs, or just payment for repairs, or you will be looking to take the matter further.

        Then see how they respond. It's an offence for anyone to sell a car that isn't roadworthy, not just dealers. Yes you do have less rights that when you buy from a dealer but people can't just sell wrecks.
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        (Original post by somethingbeautiful)
        I'll make this as brief as poss:

        • Bought my first car off autotrader
        • Guy told me it was 'great little car', 'no problems', 'drives well', 'new tyres'
        • Sister saw it - said the back tyre looked old
        • Had trouble moving off in it
        • Took it to garage - back tyre was 14 years old, told it was dangerous. Good tread but tyre wall was splitting.
        • Wasn't moving off properly due to misfire. Leaking petrol. Fixed it for £200 + £40 for new back tyre - thought that was the end of it.
        • 3 days ago starting hearing grinding noise - got very bad today
        • Drove it to another garage - guy opened it up & told me it's previously been in an accident
        • Some things under the bonnet had come loose due to the accident - grinding noise was wires getting chewed up


        Now I need to get it re-wired and I'm taking back to the garage for a check to see what other damage was caused it in the accident to see if it's worth keeping.
        BUT where do i stand with this - I've been sold something under false pretenses. I would never have bought a car if I knew it had been in an accident and if I knew I'd be paying £200+ to fix it up. It seems like stuff keeps going wrong with it ever since I got it but I thought ''oh it's a cheap 2nd hand car, this must be normal'' - but no it's not.

        Will it affect my insurance?
        How did it pass it's MOT?! (he had it's MOT done a month before I bought it)
        I have not had the log book or anything confirming that I own the car and it's been 3 weeks - should I phone the DVLA now?
        I don't trust a word the seller said to me now so how do I find if he sold me a stolen car?

        I know it's mess. You live and learn. But I just need to figure out where I stand and what to do now. Fix the wires and continue driving it or get in touch with the guy and ask for my money back (but I've spent over £200 fixing it so why would I give it back to him and make a loss? And my insurance cancellation date has passed so I don't know how that works).

        Anyone who can answer any of this, I'd be grateful.
        If I were you, I'd run a few checks on it - you might be driving in a dangerous car and/or breaking the law.

        First of all, run a vehicle data check (aka HPI) on it. These can cost as little as £3, and will tell you if the car has been written off, stolen or has a debt on it, etc.

        The MOT test simply checks that the car is reasonably safe at the time the test was conducted. The fact that it's passed its MOT could be due to the MOT not being carried out correctly, the accident occurring after the MOT test, or it could just mean that the car is actually in a roadworthy condition despite the damage. However, an MOT certificate is NOT proof of the vehicle's MOT status - it is very easy to forge an MOT certificate as they are just printed on normal blank A4 paper nowadays. You can check the vehicle's actual MOT status here: https://www.gov.uk/check-mot-status. I believe that it is possible to get an MOT test done even if it's not due, just for piece of mind, and if not, a garage can perform tests on your car to make sure it is safe and roadworthy.

        The 14 year old tyre is a bit odd, but it could just be that the previous owner put the original spare tyre on recently.

        It won't affect your insurance at all, as long as it's not recorded as a write-off (aka total loss). If it is, you should contact your insurer and tell them, as some insurers can be a bit funny about insuring cars that are total losses, some insurers will refuse to provide cover for them (e.g. Swiftcover) and others may only allow third party cover on them. If the car has been written off, it should have had a VIC test performed on it, your HPI check should tell you whether or not this has been done. If it hasn't, the DVLA won't provide you with the V5C and you will need to get this done in order to return the vehicle to the road.
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        (Original post by Maccees)
        I'd write them a letter stating when you bought the car, and the advert stated that there were no problems and the car had new tyres.

        Go on to say that the description they gave was false, and you deem the car not to have been roadworthy due to the worn tyres and accident damage causing dangerous engine problems, and you want either a full refund including repairs, or just payment for repairs, or you will be looking to take the matter further.

        Then see how they respond. It's an offence for anyone to sell a car that isn't roadworthy, not just dealers. Yes you do have less rights that when you buy from a dealer but people can't just sell wrecks.
        This - and maybe report it to autotrader so they can blacklist the guy or whatever, they may also have records of the advert.

        Very sorry to hear this anyway. Make sure you check a car over in the future before you buy it.
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        (Original post by NewFolder)
        If I were you, I'd run a few checks on it - you might be driving in a dangerous car and/or breaking the law.

        First of all, run a vehicle data check (aka HPI) on it. These can cost as little as £3, and will tell you if the car has been written off, stolen or has a debt on it, etc.

        The MOT test simply checks that the car is reasonably safe at the time the test was conducted. The fact that it's passed its MOT could be due to the MOT not being carried out correctly, the accident occurring after the MOT test, or it could just mean that the car is actually in a roadworthy condition despite the damage. However, an MOT certificate is NOT proof of the vehicle's MOT status - it is very easy to forge an MOT certificate as they are just printed on normal blank A4 paper nowadays. You can check the vehicle's actual MOT status here: https://www.gov.uk/check-mot-status. I believe that it is possible to get an MOT test done even if it's not due, just for piece of mind, and if not, a garage can perform tests on your car to make sure it is safe and roadworthy.

        The 14 year old tyre is a bit odd, but it could just be that the previous owner put the original spare tyre on recently.

        It won't affect your insurance at all, as long as it's not recorded as a write-off (aka total loss). If it is, you should contact your insurer and tell them, as some insurers can be a bit funny about insuring cars that are total losses, some insurers will refuse to provide cover for them (e.g. Swiftcover) and others may only allow third party cover on them. If the car has been written off, it should have had a VIC test performed on it, your HPI check should tell you whether or not this has been done. If it hasn't, the DVLA won't provide you with the V5C and you will need to get this done in order to return the vehicle to the road.
        Thanks for this response - very helpful. I ran a check on it (one of those 3 quid checks) - thankfully it's not stolen which I was beginning to worry about. It was written off in 2010 as a category 'C' accident. But it passed a VIC a year later. Since it's passed the VIC, do I need to inform my insurer? I'm currently waiting for the V5C to come in the post - it's been 3 weeks and the DVLA website says wait 4 weeks and then contact them, so I'll hang on for a bit longer. I checked it's MOT status - it's been done but I think he must have had a mate at his local garage do it for him because any mechanic with half a brain would not have given it a pass on it's MOT. I'm getting it re-wired today and then I'm taking it to a garage for them to have a good look at and tell me if it's safe to drive.

        In hindsight I should have done a history check on the car before I bought it and I'd strongly recommend other people to do it when buying a used car - but I wasn't aware that you could do it - or do it so easily. My parent doesn't drive and none of my mates have cars so I had no one who knew much about cars to help me - so I just winged it. On the plus side I've learnt a lot of stuff about cars now and how to tell if they're not worth buying, so next time I'll know what to look for and what to avoid. Bit of an expensive lesson though!
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        (Original post by somethingbeautiful)
        Thanks for this response - very helpful. I ran a check on it (one of those 3 quid checks) - thankfully it's not stolen which I was beginning to worry about. It was written off in 2010 as a category 'C' accident. But it passed a VIC a year later. Since it's passed the VIC, do I need to inform my insurer? I'm currently waiting for the V5C to come in the post - it's been 3 weeks and the DVLA website says wait 4 weeks and then contact them, so I'll hang on for a bit longer. I checked it's MOT status - it's been done but I think he must have had a mate at his local garage do it for him because any mechanic with half a brain would not have given it a pass on it's MOT. I'm getting it re-wired today and then I'm taking it to a garage for them to have a good look at and tell me if it's safe to drive.

        In hindsight I should have done a history check on the car before I bought it and I'd strongly recommend other people to do it when buying a used car - but I wasn't aware that you could do it - or do it so easily. My parent doesn't drive and none of my mates have cars so I had no one who knew much about cars to help me - so I just winged it. On the plus side I've learnt a lot of stuff about cars now and how to tell if they're not worth buying, so next time I'll know what to look for and what to avoid. Bit of an expensive lesson though!
        Yes it would be better to let your insurers know. As I said before, the majority of insurers will be fine with it, it's just that a few of them don't insure previous write-offs. Some of them will but with certain conditions, such as having the car inspected or only offering third party cover. Most insurers will be completely fine with it however.

        There is nothing wrong with a category C car, as long as it's been repaired safely. Category C basically means that it's uneconomical to repair, if the car wasn't worth much at the time of the accident, it wouldn't take a major collision to write it off. The only problems with them is the insurance issue and the value will be about 25% lower than an equivalent non written-off car. Other than that, it's just the same as any other car.
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        Any updates on this op?
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        (Original post by NewFolder)
        Yes it would be better to let your insurers know. As I said before, the majority of insurers will be fine with it, it's just that a few of them don't insure previous write-offs. Some of them will but with certain conditions, such as having the car inspected or only offering third party cover. Most insurers will be completely fine with it however.

        There is nothing wrong with a category C car, as long as it's been repaired safely. Category C basically means that it's uneconomical to repair, if the car wasn't worth much at the time of the accident, it wouldn't take a major collision to write it off. The only problems with them is the insurance issue and the value will be about 25% lower than an equivalent non written-off car. Other than that, it's just the same as any other car.
        Thanks for your help

        (Original post by shaymarriott)
        Any updates on this op?
        Yes, I got it re-wired and then before I even had chance to take it to the garage it started leaking coolant from underneath (massive amounts). The garage can't find the source - it does it intermittently so I've just got a massive bottle of water and a carton of coolant in the boot in case it does it again but I'm not having it fixed because they don't even know where it's coming from and anything they suggest to fix it would be a guess (e.g replacing the radiator) and it may not even fix the problem. So I'm not wasting my money. The garage have told me that there's no way it will pass it's next MOT because it has really bad corrosion underneath - they showed me it and it's rusty all around the joints/axles, the exhaust is rusty and has a hole in it and the driver's seat belt anchorage it corroded plus it has 2 oil leaks. It would cost me more than the car is worth to get it to pass next year's MOT and there's not much chance of anyone wanting to buy it.

        All I can do is phone up trading standards and query it but they're likely to tell me to contact the seller and there's no way he'll give me my money back (plus the £300 I've spent on repairs so far). It could lead to a court case if he refuses and I really could do without it so I think I'll just keep the car and hope that it stays in a drive-able condition for one year until the MOT runs out and then I'll take it to a scrap yard.
        Oh and I got my V5C so at least I can tax it next month!
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        One thing to remember I that it's illegal to drive in a car which would not pass an MOT... If you get pulled over you could get three points I the police decide to have a look at the vehicle. Be careful!

        I'd scour the original advert and see if you can find any discrepancies between what's there and what you have. If you can show the product was not as advertised you may be able to go down the route of small claims court. For your money it's worth looking into!
       
       
       
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