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    My AS grades and predicted grades are ABBB, for biology, maths, chemistry and physics respectively. My sixthform has a strict policy on keeping the predicted grades same as what you achieved in AS.

    Does this mean medicine for me is out for good? :confused:

    What possible alternatives do I have, apart from applying as a graduate, which for me is a horrible horrible option?

    P.s. I've just found out I may be predicted an A* for biology. The other three will remain the same, I think.
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    (Original post by imnehawoo)
    My AS grades and predicted grades are ABBB, for biology, maths, chemistry and physics respectively. My sixthform has a strict policy on keeping the predicted grades same as what you achieved in AS.

    Does this mean medicine for me is out for good? :confused:

    What possible alternatives do I have, apart from applying as a graduate, which for me is a horrible horrible option?
    Well that's silly- how would someone at your sixth form get predicted an A* then ? and you can apply to st george's for biochemistry, and convert in your second or third year into medicine.
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    If they really won't predict you AAA, then you could always wait, get your A2 results, take a gap year and apply for 2015 entry. That way you wouldn't have to do grad entry, and you'd be sure of your grades before you apply
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    As has been said, the best thing to do if they won't predict you AAA (even if you beg) is to take a gap year and apply with achieved grades. Don't see graduate entry as a primary route into medicine - it's a lot more difficult than the normal route (both to study and to get into), same applies for transfer from biomedical degrees.
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    (Original post by FutureHeartSurg)
    Well that's silly- how would someone at your sixth form get predicted an A* then ? and you can apply to st george's for biochemistry, and convert in your second or third year into medicine.
    They only get predicted A*'s if they get high A's, as in above 90%. That looks like a plan, will they definitely allow me to convert? Does this mean I spend only one extra year at university, compared to the other med students?
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    (Original post by Beska)
    As has been said, the best thing to do if they won't predict you AAA (even if you beg) is to take a gap year and apply with achieved grades. Don't see graduate entry as a primary route into medicine - it's a lot more difficult than the normal route (both to study and to get into), same applies for transfer from biomedical degrees.
    I feel like a gap year is far too risky; what do I do for an entire year? I can't afford all those fancy oversea volunteering programs and what if I'm at a disadvantage because my A-level learning is not fresh in my mind, etc?

    Is transferring from a biomedical degree really such a bad route?
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    (Original post by woodpecker)
    If they really won't predict you AAA, then you could always wait, get your A2 results, take a gap year and apply for 2015 entry. That way you wouldn't have to do grad entry, and you'd be sure of your grades before you apply
    what do you recommend to do during the gap year? What would the universities like?
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    (Original post by imnehawoo)
    what do you recommend to do during the gap year? What would the universities like?
    Do whatever you have always wanted to do! Work for a few months to earn some money, do something useful and different, because you might not get another chance for a long time! I don't know ANYONE who has regretted a gap year, and 80% of graduates wish they had taken one! Also, the statistics provided by my college, where around 150 students apply to medicine each year, say that those applying post-A2 results actually have a much much higher chance of being accepted. Universities like gap year students because they enable you to become more mature, independent and show that even after a year out you still want to return to education.
    I think thats very unfair that your school doesn't put predicted grades up! I got AABB at AS and had to beg my chemistry teacher to put it up but eventually he did and now I have a deferred place to study at Leeds.
    Good luck, and talk to people who have done gap years. You'll soon realize what a great opportunity it is!
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    (Original post by imnehawoo)
    I feel like a gap year is far too risky; what do I do for an entire year? I can't afford all those fancy oversea volunteering programs and what if I'm at a disadvantage because my A-level learning is not fresh in my mind, etc?

    Is transferring from a biomedical degree really such a bad route?
    Yes. There are only a couple of places which offer it, and even then it's usually only to a handful of students each year. Bearing in mind that many of the students on those courses will be aiming for one of those transfer spots, the competition is intense, probably worse than for straightforward medicine applications. There is absolutely no guarantee that you'd be able to transfer, so you would have to be willing to stay on and complete a degree that your heart's not really in, adding thousands to your student debt, before throwing yourself into the unpredictable world of graduate medicine applications.

    If your school really won't predict you AAA, then a gap year is a much more sensible option - you don't have to spend loads on fancy projects, you can just get a job, sort out your own volunteering. travel if you earn enough money etc... Just make sure you work hard in U6th so you get the grades to apply next year!
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    (Original post by imnehawoo)
    They only get predicted A*'s if they get high A's, as in above 90%. That looks like a plan, will they definitely allow me to convert? Does this mean I spend only one extra year at university, compared to the other med students?
    They have a certain criteria for the conversion- you have to get certain marks and so forth ( you can look this up ) but if you hit the criteria then they will allow you to convert. And the conversion occurs in the second or third year, can't remember which. However the base of medicine and biochemistry are quite similar , especially for the first year, so i'm not sure if you even have to spend an extra year at all.
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    That's quite harsh, a similar person I know what in your position and she said she would take a gap year and apply with her grades in hand,..haven't heard from her for nearly 2 years now
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    (Original post by imnehawoo)
    I feel like a gap year is far too risky; what do I do for an entire year? I can't afford all those fancy oversea volunteering programs and what if I'm at a disadvantage because my A-level learning is not fresh in my mind, etc?

    Is transferring from a biomedical degree really such a bad route?
    It isn't risky. If you want to do medicine, it's the only viable option if you don't get predicted AAA. You don't need to do lots of fancy overseas volunteering at all. I disagree with all of that market anyway, it's an absolute waste of money. Spend lots of time working on your application, spend lots of time preparing for interviews, and do some long-term volunteering - maybe half a day a week - at a hospital or something similar. If there are gaps - say, GP work experience - then get that too. Or get a normal job to help you save up some money for uni. As long as you do something and don't spend the whole time sat on your arse, that's the main thing.

    The actual tangible content of A-Levels means nothing while you're studying medicine - it is the actual act of being able to get AAA/A*AA that is important. That is, it is your ability to effectively manage your time and cram all that information into your brain to such a level that you are able to achieve those grades. I, and I doubt any of my colleagues, have at any point thought while sitting their exams "oh, I remember my AS teacher talking about this, so glad I did AS physics!" or whatever.

    You might be at a disadvantage, when you start medical school, because you're gonna be out of the learning frame of mind compared to everybody that has come straight from school. I took a gap year and didn't notice it too badly. As long as you do the work and don't rest on your laurels you'll be fine.

    And yes, the transfer route is stupid. Don't go into a course hoping to transfer to something else - you'll have no real motivation to study the material, and the extreme odds are that you will not be able to transfer and you'll be stuck paying very good money studying for a course you don't want to do.
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    (Original post by imnehawoo)
    what do you recommend to do during the gap year? What would the universities like?
    Do anything you want, as long as it's productive in some way. It doesn't have to be directly related to medicine. You could work for a bit to earn some money to go travelling, work the whole year to help with finance at uni, or find some volunteer project to do. If you can't go abroad, there's loads of things to do in the UK (you could look at this website if you want www.do-it.org.uk) Universities just don't want to see that you've been lounging around all year watching tv and doing nothing!

    I'm going to apply this year for deferred entry and take a gap year. I do A-level German at the moment, so I'm going to go and work in Germany for a few months, to improve my German and earn some money at the same time. I'm then (hopefully, although this isn't completely worked out yet!) going to go to Uganda and help in an antenatal clinic there for a few weeks.

    It's really up to you what you do, but at my school we're really encouraged to take a gap year, as they say it can be the best year of your life.
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    (Original post by imnehawoo)
    My AS grades and predicted grades are ABBB, for biology, maths, chemistry and physics respectively. My sixthform has a strict policy on keeping the predicted grades same as what you achieved in AS.

    Does this mean medicine for me is out for good? :confused:

    What possible alternatives do I have, apart from applying as a graduate, which for me is a horrible horrible option?
    Try and beg for the AAA predictions. Hull York would consider your application if you're predicted AAB: http://www.hyms.ac.uk/undergraduate/...y-requirements

    Keele would consider you if you're predicted A*AB. If you don't get the predicted grades you need, apply with achieved grades. I got the predicted grades I needed but chose not to apply for different reasons. I've got the grades now and can focus on other parts of my application. I'm really glad I took this gap year because I can finally do everything I've never had time for! If you apply with achieved grades, you would have a small advantage when applying to certain universities such as Leeds and Queen's Belfast. Look at this if you haven't already: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki...your_Strengths
 
 
 
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