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Do most science applicants have science related work experience Watch

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    I am beginning to write a list of relevant stuff to write on my personal statement, and have realised that I have no practical real life experience. I wasn't worried until I realised that most of my friends have done some kind of practical work experience
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    (Original post by IndiaJones)
    I am beginning to write a list of relevant stuff to write on my personal statement (I wish to study biomedical science), and have realised that I have no practical real life experience. I wasn't worried until I realised that most of my friends (science applicants) have done some kind of veterinary surgery work experience, nuffield research placement, hospital shadowing/experience, PHD student shadowing, summer school etc. and I have none. I have tried to organised some but responses haven't been good.

    My question is, is it common for science applicants to have practical experience, I worry as I have realised don't really have anything 'eye catching' to put on my personal statement.

    Thank you
    Firstly, don't worry too much about not having work experience as it is not essential, and you may have some other great things that compensate for this. However, I would really encourage you to get some, as it will make your application look better, which is important when courses are competitive. You will be going up against candidates who have been doing several placements over the fast few years/months. I know how hard it can be (especially if you don't have connections in the industry), but just keep phoning places. For me phoning was better as I got an instant response of yes/no, and didn't have to wait days for a letter or an email reply. My local hospital had an 18 month work experience waiting list, so one Friday afternoon I phoned a care home instead, and they offered that I start my work experience the following Monday! Maybe you could try something similar? Even if you did a week/a few days volunteering at a care home you could say in your PS how it confirmed that you really want to help people, and perhaps one day you'll be able to be working to find cures for people. Just an idea. Also remember that your work experience doesn't have to be super impressive- just as long as you can write about what you learnt and how it made you even more passionate to study the course. Good luck xxx
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    Nope. Most people just don't access to these kinds of things.
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    (Original post by IndiaJones)
    I am beginning to write a list of relevant stuff to write on my personal statement (I wish to study biomedical science), and have realised that I have no practical real life experience. I wasn't worried until I realised that most of my friends (science applicants) have done some kind of veterinary surgery work experience, nuffield research placement, hospital shadowing/experience, PHD student shadowing, summer school etc. and I have none. I have tried to organised some but responses haven't been good.

    My question is, is it common for science applicants to have practical experience, I worry as I have realised don't really have anything 'eye catching' to put on my personal statement.

    Thank you

    No, unless you're applying for Medicine (I assume it'd be the same for Dentistry and Veterinary Science), work experience is not expected (subject relevant or not). (For Medicine, it is essential)

    As a maths applicant, I wrote about the extra curricular stuff I had done to do with maths, for example:
    -an open university short course about the history of mathematics,
    -maths masterclass day at Cambridge
    -entering various maths & physics challenges throughout school and college , I wrote about how they helped me to practice and develop my problem solving abilities,
    -going on a Villier's Park course,
    -reading books about maths, famous maths problems, interesting maths, whatever. Read some books about your subject, write about how they inspired you.

    etc.


    Show that you're interested in and passionate about your subject outside of your A Levels, that you're putting time into the subject not because you have to, but because you want to. Reading is a great way to do this. Sure, if you can get work experience that is relevant, and helps to show how passionate you are about your subject - great, do it, but its not something you have to have.

    PHD student shadowing: What is a GCSE/AS Level student going to get out of that? I guess it depends on what the PHD student is researching, but I can't imagine a GCSE/AS student being able to understand it.
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    I don't think most do, but I think those that do have a marginal advantage with applications, provided they can explain what they did on work experience, the skills they acquired and show a developed understanding of the principles behind it.
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    Well, I did the following to try and demonstrate my scientific interest (for Cantab. NatSci)

    Membership of Royal Society of Chemistry, and Institute of Physics
    Lectures including by Sir John Pendry
    Two weeks at Southampton University Physics Dept

    I wanted/carried out a Year in Industry job at Dstl Porton Down (Chemical research)

    Apart from Porton Down, the other things I hoped conveyed sustained interest in physical science, hopefully it worked the Senior Tutor was impressed by my job.

    So I guess do what you can, but despite what others may say, your focus must be on doing as well as possible in A Levels. But then again I am not a fan in the British system of appying with predicted A2 results. If you wish to have a relevant gap year, then potentially it is a huge gamble applying during gap year ie without deferral, since you wont have the option of getting in by the back door as some do during Clearing etc. or if you just miss grades. Then again the potential gains - applying with (hopefully) excellent completed A Levels is much less risky for the tutors, and offers will be unconditional - greatly outweigh these risks :-)
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    lol no, quite frankly the admissions tutors won't be expecting you to have it
 
 
 
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