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    If a company has done a fair bit of philanthropic work however they have direct connections with suppliers who use slavery, would an economist say that the company does not need to have corporate social responsibility in trying to fix the slave situation?

    Assuming that the amount of philanthropic work changes with the amount of profits.
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    A company's only duty is to its share holders which is profit. It is the job of governments to eliminate poverty, slavery etc.
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    The OP has centered the debate around a given content so lets all debate within said context, ideally everyone in that situation should be working to stop slavery ( which is illegal in the free market system). However I would not expect companies, which are made up of individuals to act broadly out of their own self interest in philanthropic ways, as there are countless examples say the enslavement of the jews by private individuals in rome for example which show that generally us humans like to be selfish and greedy.
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    (Original post by ImNew)
    A company's only duty is to its share holders which is profit. It is the job of governments to eliminate poverty, slavery etc.
    If the company focuses on purely profit making and the government focuses on regulation, how would we know that we could appease the financial hunger of the corporation? Giving them no responsibility at all and letting them focus on profit maximising would encourage these corporations to commit bribery and we all know that government officials aren't filled with virtues.
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    (Original post by captainchalk)
    If the company focuses on purely profit making and the government focuses on regulation, how would we know that we could appease the financial hunger of the corporation? Giving them no responsibility at all and letting them focus on profit maximising would encourage these corporations to commit bribery and we all know that government officials aren't filled with virtues.
    What makes you think that 'we' outside of our own purchases really change the behaviour of companies. Also we have courts of law for a reason, another approach is to take away the government officials power so that they do not mis-use it. I mean we subsidize rail companies, who raise their fares about inflation year on year and goverment officials keep pumping tax payers money into these private companies in order to keep fares down, however fares keep going up and profits keep rising? It seems as the subsidies are being misdirected
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    (Original post by James Flahey)
    What makes you think that 'we' outside of our own purchases really change the behaviour of companies. Also we have courts of law for a reason, another approach is to take away the government officials power so that they do not mis-use it. I mean we subsidize rail companies, who raise their fares about inflation year on year and goverment officials keep pumping tax payers money into these private companies in order to keep fares down, however fares keep going up and profits keep rising? It seems as the subsidies are being misdirected
    That's only possible in countries where the rule of law is strong and it doesn't apply to suppliers if they are based in developing countries where there may not be enough funds to help enforce the law? In many situations, the government may focus on lowering murder rates and other capital crimes and abolishing slavery, which helps with the economic growth, would be last on their list. Isn't it then the responsibility of the company to enter that country to help?
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    (Original post by captainchalk)
    That's only possible in countries where the rule of law is strong and it doesn't apply to suppliers if they are based in developing countries where there may not be enough funds to help enforce the law? Isn't it then the responsibility of the company to enter that country to help?
    Uh there is no point debating this issue in the context of somalia,is there? I assumed we were using Britain as the example
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    (Original post by James Flahey)
    Uh there is no point debating this issue in the context of somalia,is there? I assumed we were using Britain as the example
    Oh I don't live in Britain haha.

    And yes, Somalia and any poor African nation could be a country we could use as an example.
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    (Original post by captainchalk)
    Oh I don't live in Britain haha.And yes, Somalia and any poor African nation could be a country we could use as an example.
    Its pointless to have frame a debate about companies responsibilities when there is not government to enforce anything, they will just do as they please, whether it is good or bad really comes down to moral compasses of the individuals that make up the company, regardless of what we think.
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    (Original post by James Flahey)
    Its pointless to have frame a debate about companies responsibilities when there is not government to enforce anything, they will just do as they please, whether it is good or bad really comes down to moral compasses of the individuals that make up the company, regardless of what we think.
    I can't believe that you are giving up... You were doing so well.

    There are companies who have acted ethically even when the rule of law isn't strong like Samsung, where they have spent millions to help care for their worker families living in Egypt who have been affected by the civil war.
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    (Original post by captainchalk)
    I can't believe that you are giving up... You were doing so well.There are companies who have acted ethically even when the rule of law isn't strong like Samsung, where they have spent millions to help care for their worker families living in Egypt who have been affected by the civil war.
    There are some companies who have acted well and others who have acted not so well. Throughout their lives there will be some humans who act in a way which we deem to be moral and those who act in ways we deem to be immoral, if you take humans as a mass and do not regulate any action your going to end up in a world with many more immoral actions.
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    (Original post by captainchalk)
    If the company focuses on purely profit making and the government focuses on regulation, how would we know that we could appease the financial hunger of the corporation? Giving them no responsibility at all and letting them focus on profit maximising would encourage these corporations to commit bribery and we all know that government officials aren't filled with virtues.
    Yes they do, do that. They bribe our government, they bribe the government in the US and they bribe every other government in the world. We can stop this by having regulations in place which prevent this. For example government funded political parties would completely eliminate political party bribery.
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    You do know that bribery laws in the USA and the EU are exceptionally strong and that any company based in either of these countries found to have partaken in it even if the bribery occurs in a country where such behaviour is the norm they are dealt with extremely harshly? It is not a matter that we don't have regulations in place to prevent bribery...
 
 
 
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