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    Just out of curiosity........does anyone know why Cambridge focuses on UMS and Oxford on GCSE results?

    I'm sure there is no definitive answer so points of view appreciated.

    Thanks.
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    I thought it was that Oxford uses is admissions tests and GCSE's when cambridge focuses on UMS. This is because cambridge believes high ums - high work ethic - good degree whereas oxford believes admissions tests are much more similar to university exams and so provide a better indicator
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    So Oxford focuses both on GCSE's and admission tests? Whilst Cambridge has admissions tests the focus is primarily on UMS?
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    (Original post by Arketec)
    So Oxford focuses both on GCSE's and admission tests? Whilst Cambridge has admissions tests the focus is primarily on UMS?
    As far as I understand. (That's for getting an interview) then the interview is more important
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    Does Oxford have more admissions tests than Cambridge?
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    (Original post by Arketec)
    Does Oxford have more admissions tests than Cambridge?
    Yeah loads more (e.g. for subjects like History, Languages, Physics, PPE, etc)
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    i'm pretty sure cambridge did research and found ums average correlates strongly with degree performance
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    The accuracy of the statement "Oxford focuses on GCSE results, Cambridge focuses on UMS" is very unclear.

    Definitely the pre-intereview aptitude tests play an important role for Oxford (otherwise they wouldn't bother!). So I'd be willing to accept "Oxford focuses on pre-interview tests, Cambridge focuses on UMS", although that's still a generalisation.

    As of the question of why they do that.... that's an interesting question!
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    (Original post by fluteflute)
    The accuracy of the statement "Oxford focuses on GCSE results, Cambridge focuses on UMS" is very unclear.

    Definitely the pre-intereview aptitude tests play an important role for Oxford (otherwise they wouldn't bother!). So I'd be willing to accept "Oxford focuses on pre-interview tests, Cambridge focuses on UMS", although that's still a generalisation.

    As of the question of why they do that.... that's an interesting question!
    Agree with this.
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    (Original post by Arketec)
    why Cambridge focuses on UMS
    This is also a very interesting area because the current government wants to kind of scrap AS levels (they want to make it so that the AS exams don't count towards the A2 mark, and so inevitably not all schools will bother doing the AS exams). Labour have pledged to prevent the changes if they are elected: Labour says reforms 'a serious threat'.

    Anyhow, if the changes go through, and AS levels do disappear, it will mean Cambridge have to rethink their approach. It's some way of yet though (we're talking about people starting A levels in 2015, so applying to university in 2016 for 2017 entry).
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    (Original post by JPL9457)
    i'm pretty sure cambridge did research and found ums average correlates strongly with degree performance
    ............and that GCSE's don't?
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    (Original post by fluteflute)
    The accuracy of the statement "Oxford focuses on GCSE results, Cambridge focuses on UMS" is very unclear.

    Definitely the pre-intereview aptitude tests play an important role for Oxford (otherwise they wouldn't bother!). So I'd be willing to accept "Oxford focuses on pre-interview tests, Cambridge focuses on UMS", although that's still a generalisation.

    As of the question of why they do that.... that's an interesting question!
    The general theory of popular belief.
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    (Original post by Arketec)
    ............and that GCSE's don't?
    You can see some statistics here:

    GCSEs do tend to correlate, just not as well as UMS. http://www.admin.cam.ac.uk/news/spec...sion-study.pdf
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    I read a few years back in some cambridge litt that......low gcse results do not indicate the level of ability as well as a level results......that a level results are a better indicator than gcse of ability at degree level-my words-it was a long time ago.

    Though gcse's could be a better correlation of aptitude?
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    There are a variety of statistical indicators used by Cambridge. One of the ones that has proved the best is using UMS to predict how likely you are to succeed on the degree course at Cambridge. There is a stronger correlation between those that got good UMS (90%) and a first, than those that got great GCSEs (7+A*s), but only just. Remember, it is an indicator; it can't actually tell the future.

    Another brilliant indicator that Cambridge use, which is in some cases better at indicating potential on their degree course than ums is scaling your GCSE performance with your schools average GCSE performance. If you went to a school that had a 23% A*-C pass rate, and managed to come out with 11A*, then there's obviously something special about you, "potentially" more so than someone who comes out with the same grades from a top grammar or private school that measures itself not on A*-C pass rate (as it's already 100%) but in terms of percentage achieving A*-A.
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    (Original post by Chief Wiggum)
    You can see some statistics here:

    GCSEs do tend to correlate, just not as well as UMS. http://www.admin.cam.ac.uk/news/spec...sion-study.pdf

    So cambridge firmly believe in the UMS and not in the aptitude tests except for mathematics.
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    (Original post by carpe diem 123)
    There are a variety of statistical indicators used by Cambridge. One of the ones that has proved the best is using UMS to predict how likely you are to succeed on the degree course at Cambridge. There is a stronger correlation between those that got good UMS (90%) and a first, than those that got great GCSEs (7+A*s), but only just. Remember, it is an indicator; it can't actually tell the future.

    Another brilliant indicator that Cambridge use, which is in some cases better at indicating potential on their degree course than ums is scaling your GCSE performance with your schools average GCSE performance. If you went to a school that had a 23% A*-C pass rate, and managed to come out with 11A*, then there's obviously something special about you, "potentially" more so than someone who comes out with the same grades from a top grammar or private school that measures itself not on A*-C pass rate (as it's already 100%) but in terms of percentage achieving A*-A.
    I would have thought that the disadvantaged pupil will have done a lot of independent study whereas the independent pupil has been taught in a more effective way at school.
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    (Original post by Arketec)
    I would have thought that the disadvantaged pupil will have done a lot of independent study whereas the independent pupil has been taught in a more effective way at school.
    If you were an admissions tutor admitting people to your course that required an incredible aptitude to study independently as well as self-motivate, which GCSE performance indicates, on the face of it, a more 'fitting' student?
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    personally, i prefer cambridge view of UMS being really important compared to oxford's view of GCSEs being really important, as how well you do in some subjects at GCSE has little to do with what you will be studying at university, e.g. getting a Bs in history and geography doesn't mean you are bad at maths

    (Original post by Arketec)
    ............and that GCSE's don't?
    they do, just not as strongly

    (Original post by carpe diem 123)
    There are a variety of statistical indicators used by Cambridge. One of the ones that has proved the best is using UMS to predict how likely you are to succeed on the degree course at Cambridge. There is a stronger correlation between those that got good UMS (90%) and a first, than those that got great GCSEs (7+A*s), but only just. Remember, it is an indicator; it can't actually tell the future.

    Another brilliant indicator that Cambridge use, which is in some cases better at indicating potential on their degree course than ums is scaling your GCSE performance with your schools average GCSE performance. If you went to a school that had a 23% A*-C pass rate, and managed to come out with 11A*, then there's obviously something special about you, "potentially" more so than someone who comes out with the same grades from a top grammar or private school that measures itself not on A*-C pass rate (as it's already 100%) but in terms of percentage achieving A*-A.
    what cambridge would call 'great GCSEs' varies a lot on the school's results, getting only 5A*s from Eton won't look as good as somebody getting 3A*s from one of the worst schools in the country

    (Original post by Goods)
    I thought it was that Oxford uses is admissions tests and GCSE's when cambridge focuses on UMS. This is because cambridge believes high ums - high work ethic - good degree whereas oxford believes admissions tests are much more similar to university exams and so provide a better indicator
    cambridge also have admission tests, and then for maths they give you an offer involving the dreaded STEP maths tests
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    (Original post by JPL9457)


    what cambridge would call 'great GCSEs' varies a lot on the school's results, getting only 5A*s from Eton won't look as good as somebody getting 3A*s from one of the worst schools in the country


    The tutors are clear to not make routine allowances for poor GCSE results. "great GCSEs' and 'great GCSEs' - the definition does not swing wildly. Yes, there is come consideration, but not on the scale you seem to be indicating.
 
 
 
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