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    Hi, I hope this is in the right forum, I wasn't sure where to put it.

    I just finished my AS year and I want to do an EPQ next year, which I was hoping to start in the summer. Unfortunately my teacher didn't really tell me where I could begin so I'm not sure what work I can do to get a headstart. I'm doing one based on physics and I have a question which I think is okay, do I just start doing research into this? How can I determine whether the facts from a credible source, what sort of places am I supposed to look? Also, my teacher said you had to do primary research e.g. a survey, but I'm not sure how to make this work with something science based? I'd really appreciate any advice or pointers on where to start.
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    Hi! I am also planning on doing an EPQ this year, mine is going to be 'The Future of Human Space Travel', so it is in the same category as yours.

    What my tutors told me was that the summer should be a time for getting used to the subject area you have selected, and for making a basic plan of the content you wish to include. I for example have made a huge mindmap linking various subjects together in some sort of useful order.

    Primary research could also be an experiment or observation, which may be more appropriate than a questionnaire in this case.

    Determining the credibility of a source isn't too hard, here is a guide on how to do it: http://www.wikihow.com/Evaluate-the-...ty-of-a-Source

    Do not shy away from using places such as wikipedia for your research, but if you want to use any of the information you find there, follow one of the citations on the page (the numbers in the square brackets) to find the place that the editors of that page originally found the info. Then evaluate that for credibility, and reference it rather than the wiki page.

    Good luck!
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    Heya, having just found out I got an A in my EPQ in my AS year at college I have some advice. I wasn't actually supposed to do it this year but there were no other AS Levels I was interested in so I took it a year early. After the first few weeks I didn't attend any of the weekly lessons either, so here is my take on it.

    First of all, you need to come up with a question, or at least a title you can write a conclusion about. Throughout the whole project, make sure your content links back to the title. Do not become sidetracked in doing research or including citations that aren't relevant because they look good.

    Second, I would split your project into a few sections, I believe mine had six (6600 words, minimum allowed is 5000). Each included several paragraphs, a few diagrams (where necessary) and also my own analysis of something within my chosen field. An introduction and a conclusion are important and you can make your introduction a little more personal, explaining why you believe finding the answer to your title question is important. Sound enthusiastic for your subject: a bit like your personal statement, it should help sway your examiner.

    I think one thing that surprised me somewhat about my A grade is that I really didn't put THAT much in depth research into my project. Be sure to include references from one or two books/journals as it looks bad if you've filled your bibliography with webpages. After writing a draft of each section, go through it and ensure your language and grammar sounds suitable. When going through mine I found a lot of words/sentences that sounded extremely dumbed down, but with use of a thesaurus and a little bit of paraphrasing I was able to improve it.

    It seems a daunting task at first, but go with your instinct. Even if you can't think of a title you're 100% sure on, research the surrounding area; although it sounds silly, you can actually edit your title to suit your project rather than vice versa. Good luck!
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    (Original post by MelonSponge)
    Hi! I am also planning on doing an EPQ this year, mine is going to be 'The Future of Human Space Travel', so it is in the same category as yours.

    What my tutors told me was that the summer should be a time for getting used to the subject area you have selected, and for making a basic plan of the content you wish to include. I for example have made a huge mindmap linking various subjects together in some sort of useful order.

    Primary research could also be an experiment or observation, which may be more appropriate than a questionnaire in this case.

    Determining the credibility of a source isn't too hard, here is a guide on how to do it: http://www.wikihow.com/Evaluate-the-...ty-of-a-Source

    Do not shy away from using places such as wikipedia for your research, but if you want to use any of the information you find there, follow one of the citations on the page (the numbers in the square brackets) to find the place that the editors of that page originally found the info. Then evaluate that for credibility, and reference it rather than the wiki page.

    Good luck!
    (Original post by MarkProbio)
    Heya, having just found out I got an A in my EPQ in my AS year at college I have some advice. I wasn't actually supposed to do it this year but there were no other AS Levels I was interested in so I took it a year early. After the first few weeks I didn't attend any of the weekly lessons either, so here is my take on it.

    First of all, you need to come up with a question, or at least a title you can write a conclusion about. Throughout the whole project, make sure your content links back to the title. Do not become sidetracked in doing research or including citations that aren't relevant because they look good.

    Second, I would split your project into a few sections, I believe mine had six (6600 words, minimum allowed is 5000). Each included several paragraphs, a few diagrams (where necessary) and also my own analysis of something within my chosen field. An introduction and a conclusion are important and you can make your introduction a little more personal, explaining why you believe finding the answer to your title question is important. Sound enthusiastic for your subject: a bit like your personal statement, it should help sway your examiner.

    I think one thing that surprised me somewhat about my A grade is that I really didn't put THAT much in depth research into my project. Be sure to include references from one or two books/journals as it looks bad if you've filled your bibliography with webpages. After writing a draft of each section, go through it and ensure your language and grammar sounds suitable. When going through mine I found a lot of words/sentences that sounded extremely dumbed down, but with use of a thesaurus and a little bit of paraphrasing I was able to improve it.

    It seems a daunting task at first, but go with your instinct. Even if you can't think of a title you're 100% sure on, research the surrounding area; although it sounds silly, you can actually edit your title to suit your project rather than vice versa. Good luck!
    Hey thanks for your replies.

    MelonSponge, that sounds like a good idea, I will get started on a nice big mindmap tomorrow in order to see where I could go with this. I was hoping to do some experiments in school as my physics teacher offered to help with this, the thing is the teacher that is leading the EPQs doesn't seem quite sure how to handle science based ones. The way she told me I needed to write the project was for it to be less factual and more weighing up opinions to reach a conclusion, like an english essay. This has confused me a bit so I think I'm going to need to find some examples of successful science EPQs to have a clearer idea of how to write them. Thanks for the link and advice, your topic sounds really interesting btw!

    MarkProbio, congratulations on getting an A, would you mind if you possibly showed me an example of some of the work you did? I think it'd be really helpful to get an idea of how to do well. What sort of thing did you write for your own analysis too? I'm just concerned that if I try to investigate something it's probably all been done before, what with it being physics, and I'd just really be confirming known facts. Your advice was very helpful though, thanks a lot.
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    For my analysis I did analysis on a football match, counting how many times certain events happened in matches. It took ages but it was simple enough to do - proves you don't need anything special.

    Don't worry about if somebody has already done the research, its about your data collection and analysis skills. State how you made the data reliable/accurate as that will impress the examiner.

    I'm not home atm but when I am I'll send you my EPQ if you're interested.
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    (Original post by MarkProbio)
    For my analysis I did analysis on a football match, counting how many times certain events happened in matches. It took ages but it was simple enough to do - proves you don't need anything special.

    Don't worry about if somebody has already done the research, its about your data collection and analysis skills. State how you made the data reliable/accurate as that will impress the examiner.

    I'm not home atm but when I am I'll send you my EPQ if you're interested.
    Ooh okay so it would be sort of like writing a report for a practical experiment? That sounds pretty good. And yeah that'd be great thankyou!
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    Yeah, don't go overboard on writing about how you gathered your data but it's definitely worth a mention.

    Here is my EPQ project if you (or anyone else) would like to know what it took to get an A. I should say it can be improved as I didn't get an A*!

    EPQ Project.docx
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    (Original post by MarkProbio)
    Yeah, don't go overboard on writing about how you gathered your data but it's definitely worth a mention.

    Here is my EPQ project if you (or anyone else) would like to know what it took to get an A. I should say it can be improved as I didn't get an A*!

    EPQ Project.docx
    Thanks so much, you're really helpful.
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    (Original post by MarkProbio)
    Yeah, don't go overboard on writing about how you gathered your data but it's definitely worth a mention.

    Here is my EPQ project if you (or anyone else) would like to know what it took to get an A. I should say it can be improved as I didn't get an A*!

    EPQ Project.docx
    That is one sexy title which i look forward to reading!! I was also wondering, what was your log like in terms of length and detail? I hear thats one of the most important parts!
 
 
 
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