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    Does anyone have any advice when it comes to studying a degree with the open university with the aim to become a primary school teacher? If I really dedicated myself to it I think I could spare about 28 hrs a week, would 28 hours be realistic for full time study per week? I read it's recommended to do about 32-36 hours a week for full time. Perhaps 90 credits is more realistic for me? Another question is when is the study time (start to finish, months wise?), and do you have to go to a centre to take actual exams? Sorry to seem dim but I just want to be very clear before I commit to something/start applying.
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    What degree do you actually want to do? A BA/BSc followed by the PGCE or something like that? Once you know what specific degree you want to be doing, look around the website and look at the modules involved in the degree. For example, with BA Childhood and Youth Studies, click on the pathway and it shows you the modules that the degree is made up of. If you click those links it'll tell you about the start dates and duration of each module.

    For exams you will go to a centre in your region. You're usually informed of the date well in advance (at least 4 months I think) and the location is sometimes a little nearer the time but still with plenty of notice. The exam centres are often at local universities or colleges where they hire out rooms, but they can be basically anywhere that has a suitable room for hire. My last one was at a place in Birmingham that usually has rooms for hire for business functions and conferences, and my one before that was at the University of Birmingham.

    I studied 90 credits a year for my first 3 years with the OU, and now 60 in my final year. On average I doubt I've spent any more than 10 hours a week on my uni work. Honestly, I regularly go weeks without even thinking about it, then just do loads of work in the week before deadlines. At the moment I haven't done anything on one module for at least a month (oops) and the other one it's been about 2 weeks. I have a deadline for the second one on Tuesday and I'll basically just work non-stop through the weekend and get the assignment in on Monday. I've always worked like this though, so I'm used to it. Doesn't matter how many plans or calendars I make, I'll never follow them. Plenty of people prefer to follow the study calendars and read the designated units/blocks every week. I'm just lazy It really depends on how you work, your knowledge of the subject, how quickly you pick things up - even how fast you type! I can knock up a basic essay really quickly because I read and type really fast. For some people it'll take a lot longer - when my mom was doing her uni work she would handwrite all her drafts (I avoid handwriting anything at all costs lol) so it took her a lot longer.
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    I'm hoping to start OU in February and i'm wondering the same thing. I want to keep earning money but i also want to do the best i can so i'm thinking about only doing 60 a year alongside a part time job. If that turns out to be too easy then i'll either go full time or study more credits the next year.

    I know that if you start in February the year ends in September but i'm not sure about October starts.

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    (Original post by Kate.)
    What degree do you actually want to do? A BA/BSc followed by the PGCE or something like that? Once you know what specific degree you want to be doing, look around the website and look at the modules involved in the degree. For example, with BA Childhood and Youth Studies, click on the pathway and it shows you the modules that the degree is made up of. If you click those links it'll tell you about the start dates and duration of each module.

    For exams you will go to a centre in your region. You're usually informed of the date well in advance (at least 4 months I think) and the location is sometimes a little nearer the time but still with plenty of notice. The exam centres are often at local universities or colleges where they hire out rooms, but they can be basically anywhere that has a suitable room for hire. My last one was at a place in Birmingham that usually has rooms for hire for business functions and conferences, and my one before that was at the University of Birmingham.

    I studied 90 credits a year for my first 3 years with the OU, and now 60 in my final year. On average I doubt I've spent any more than 10 hours a week on my uni work. Honestly, I regularly go weeks without even thinking about it, then just do loads of work in the week before deadlines. At the moment I haven't done anything on one module for at least a month (oops) and the other one it's been about 2 weeks. I have a deadline for the second one on Tuesday and I'll basically just work non-stop through the weekend and get the assignment in on Monday. I've always worked like this though, so I'm used to it. Doesn't matter how many plans or calendars I make, I'll never follow them. Plenty of people prefer to follow the study calendars and read the designated units/blocks every week. I'm just lazy It really depends on how you work, your knowledge of the subject, how quickly you pick things up - even how fast you type! I can knock up a basic essay really quickly because I read and type really fast. For some people it'll take a lot longer - when my mom was doing her uni work she would handwrite all her drafts (I avoid handwriting anything at all costs lol) so it took her a lot longer.
    You sound just like me when it comes to studying things haha ! Thank you so much for your help its really given me the confidence to start, I think I will definitely have the time for 90 credits a year and still enjoy life! I was considering an English degree, I like science and history but I feel English is an easier subject (and a core subject). Then take a year out of work to do the pgce. I live in essex so quite close to a lot of uni's which will be easy to reach for exams hopefully! I'm really excited to get going (never thought I'd say that about studies!). Good luck with the last bits of your degree and thanks again for your reply!
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    (Original post by PlatypusRex)
    I'm hoping to start OU in February and i'm wondering the same thing. I want to keep earning money but i also want to do the best i can so i'm thinking about only doing 60 a year alongside a part time job. If that turns out to be too easy then i'll either go full time or study more credits the next year.

    I know that if you start in February the year ends in September but i'm not sure about October starts.

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    I'm glad there is someone who feels the same as me! After reading Kate.'s reply I think I could do 90 a year. I think if you work part time you will do really well! Feb to sept doesn't sound too bad at all! I completely agree with the money thing, it would be inpossible to quit work and have no income right now. Good luck in your degree and thank you for your reply!
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    (Original post by Katie Nx)
    You sound just like me when it comes to studying things haha ! Thank you so much for your help its really given me the confidence to start, I think I will definitely have the time for 90 credits a year and still enjoy life! I was considering an English degree, I like science and history but I feel English is an easier subject (and a core subject). Then take a year out of work to do the pgce. I live in essex so quite close to a lot of uni's which will be easy to reach for exams hopefully! I'm really excited to get going (never thought I'd say that about studies!). Good luck with the last bits of your degree and thanks again for your reply!
    I study Science and you need to dedicate a lot of time to the subject it is not easy, on the other hand I have friends who do English and don't have a quarter of the workload I have.... 90 sounds perfect for you!! Good luck


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    (Original post by Kate.)
    What degree do you actually want to do? A BA/BSc followed by the PGCE or something like that? Once you know what specific degree you want to be doing, look around the website and look at the modules involved in the degree. For example, with BA Childhood and Youth Studies, click on the pathway and it shows you the modules that the degree is made up of. If you click those links it'll tell you about the start dates and duration of each module.

    For exams you will go to a centre in your region. You're usually informed of the date well in advance (at least 4 months I think) and the location is sometimes a little nearer the time but still with plenty of notice. The exam centres are often at local universities or colleges where they hire out rooms, but they can be basically anywhere that has a suitable room for hire. My last one was at a place in Birmingham that usually has rooms for hire for business functions and conferences, and my one before that was at the University of Birmingham.

    I studied 90 credits a year for my first 3 years with the OU, and now 60 in my final year. On average I doubt I've spent any more than 10 hours a week on my uni work. Honestly, I regularly go weeks without even thinking about it, then just do loads of work in the week before deadlines. At the moment I haven't done anything on one module for at least a month (oops) and the other one it's been about 2 weeks. I have a deadline for the second one on Tuesday and I'll basically just work non-stop through the weekend and get the assignment in on Monday. I've always worked like this though, so I'm used to it. Doesn't matter how many plans or calendars I make, I'll never follow them. Plenty of people prefer to follow the study calendars and read the designated units/blocks every week. I'm just lazy It really depends on how you work, your knowledge of the subject, how quickly you pick things up - even how fast you type! I can knock up a basic essay really quickly because I read and type really fast. For some people it'll take a lot longer - when my mom was doing her uni work she would handwrite all her drafts (I avoid handwriting anything at all costs lol) so it took her a lot longer.
    I wish my degree was like that :-(


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    Why not ask them?

    Seriously, very few people can cope with a full-time course and a full-time job, and since the OU was designed for people in work you can vary the work-load to match the study time that you have available. Obviously, the fewer credits you take each year the more years you need to complete your degree, but it is better to begin with too light a load and increase it later than to take on too much and fail something. Anyway, they have calculated in great detail how much study time you need for each module and have trained advisors to help people work out how much to take on.
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    I did 110 level 1 credits in my first year alongside full-time work. That was comfortable. At level 2 I haven't exactly noticed a workload increase in terms of module materials, just a sense that shortcuts cannot be taken. At L1 you can often fall back on prior knowledge and the TMA questions are structured like an exam paper. The L2 stuff guides you less but you truly realise the value of yhe activities, which questions feed off sometimes.

    My advice:
    - Take 40 as a starting point, then another 30 later on, and if you fancy it another 10/20 (gives you 70-90 credits)
    - Read your TMAs as soon as possible after they come out. Get key words and jot down page numbers in the textbooks that seem relevant
    - Don't throw out your course books as new modules may build upon them.

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    (Original post by PlatypusRex)
    I'm hoping to start OU in February and i'm wondering the same thing. I want to keep earning money but i also want to do the best i can so i'm thinking about only doing 60 a year alongside a part time job. If that turns out to be too easy then i'll either go full time or study more credits the next year.

    I know that if you start in February the year ends in September but i'm not sure about October starts.

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    They often overlap, and when taking courses alongside one another, the OU really have mastered how to clash deadlines in the most inconvenient way. You learn to manage it, though.

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    (Original post by Katie Nx)
    OU

    Hi,

    I'm doing B65 (Engineering) and also work full time 12 hour shifts 4 days per week. Like you I didn't wanna be dragging my degree out for 5, 6, 7 odd years so tried to blast it out as quick as I can without compromising my results.

    In my first year I done MST121, MS221, T173, TXR120 (100 credits). This was a breeze, however my social life took a little but of a hit and a few late nights were involved. I felt fully prepared for all assignments and exams.

    In my second year I done MST209, T191, TXR220, T207 (145 credits). This was nasty. I picked a hard module (MST209) along with T207 which was time consuming. I had to ask for extensions repeatedly for MST209 but still maintained good assignment marks (>75%) throughout. Eventually this began to overlap with T207 and TXR220 residential week so I took 4 months off work so that I wouldn't fall behind any more. I can honestly say that it wouldn't have been possible to study this much material and prep for an exam without this time off... Thankfully I got the grade I wanted in my July exam so it all paid off! Got my T207 exam coming up in October which I'm a little less worried about.

    For my level 3 modules I don't plan on doing anything as intense. I've got 15 credits starting in October 2013, than another 60 starting in February 2014. Then 30 the following October (2014), and the final 30 in February 2015. Not ideal but I don't wanna go through the stress of my second year again!

    This is from a science / mathematics degree, not sure what an English degree would be like in terms of workload. I found a definite step up from the level 1 materials to the level 2 stuff, and I'd imagine that it would be similar going from level 2 to level 3 so you've got to take that into consideration.

    Hope this helps! Good luck

    PS: Remember you can always visit your OU regional centre to check out the materials for the modules you want to start before committing.
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    (Original post by kjglen24)
    I study Science and you need to dedicate a lot of time to the subject it is not easy, on the other hand I have friends who do English and don't have a quarter of the workload I have.... 90 sounds perfect for you!! Good luck


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    Yes science modules can be very tough especially if you haven't done any related study in the topic you're focusing on. Concepts can be hard to grasp and need a lot of study time.

    With many science modules they stick in a load of activities for you to do inbetween the reading. It's tempting to skip them but you can get found out in the TMAs when they ask questions which assume that you've done the activities. You might think that you'll read a TMA well in advance and only do the activities relevant to the questions. But it's often only when you're getting into the nitty gritty of the questions you realise that you needed to have done an activity to give a comprehensive answer. You might try and do them last minute but if it's a 3 hour activity then that's a lot to catch up with close to a TMA deadline.

    Having said that if you do the work with science you'll get decent marks. From what I've seen with humanities modules, you can do the work and still get a duff mark. Marking is often much harsher because of the larger degree of subjectivity involved. But if you're a natural you can probably get away with a lighter work load.
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    (Original post by Bleak Lemming)
    x
    To add to this, I took in my first year:
    October
    S104 (60 credits)
    S154 (10 credits)
    S151 (10 credits)

    February
    MST121 (30 credits)

    = 110 credits

    In my second year:
    October
    S155 (10 credits)

    February
    SXC288 (30 credits) <-- First L2 module, in progress now

    = 40 credits

    This year might be a slow one, unless anyone can recommend an easy module to take alongside T213 which starts in Feb? I'm planning on doing the ******* S207 next October which starts for the last time I think.
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    (Original post by Bleak Lemming)
    Hi,

    I'm doing B65 (Engineering) and also work full time 12 hour shifts 4 days per week. Like you I didn't wanna be dragging my degree out for 5, 6, 7 odd years so tried to blast it out as quick as I can without compromising my results.

    In my first year I done MST121, MS221, T173, TXR120 (100 credits). This was a breeze, however my social life took a little but of a hit and a few late nights were involved. I felt fully prepared for all assignments and exams.

    In my second year I done MST209, T191, TXR220, T207 (145 credits). This was nasty. I picked a hard module (MST209) along with T207 which was time consuming. I had to ask for extensions repeatedly for MST209 but still maintained good assignment marks (>75%) throughout. Eventually this began to overlap with T207 and TXR220 residential week so I took 4 months off work so that I wouldn't fall behind any more. I can honestly say that it wouldn't have been possible to study this much material and prep for an exam without this time off... Thankfully I got the grade I wanted in my July exam so it all paid off! Got my T207 exam coming up in October which I'm a little less worried about.

    For my level 3 modules I don't plan on doing anything as intense. I've got 15 credits starting in October 2013, than another 60 starting in February 2014. Then 30 the following October (2014), and the final 30 in February 2015. Not ideal but I don't wanna go through the stress of my second year again!

    This is from a science / mathematics degree, not sure what an English degree would be like in terms of workload. I found a definite step up from the level 1 materials to the level 2 stuff, and I'd imagine that it would be similar going from level 2 to level 3 so you've got to take that into consideration.

    Hope this helps! Good luck

    PS: Remember you can always visit your OU regional centre to check out the materials for the modules you want to start before committing.
    thank you! I will speak to the open uni of course but I find it helpful to know about other people's studies and how much is possible etc engineering sounds like a hard degree, English should be a doddle in comparison! I'm so glad you can pick exactly how much to do. Good luck with the rest of your degree
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    (Original post by addylad)
    To add to this, I took in my first year:
    October
    S104 (60 credits)
    S154 (10 credits)
    S151 (10 credits)

    February
    MST121 (30 credits)

    = 110 credits

    In my second year:
    October
    S155 (10 credits)

    February
    SXC288 (30 credits) <-- First L2 module, in progress now

    = 40 credits

    This year might be a slow one, unless anyone can recommend an easy module to take alongside T213 which starts in Feb? I'm planning on doing the ******* S207 next October which starts for the last time I think.
    Thank you addylad all your posts have been helpful to me. I like to know how much people can manage, it's more confidence boosting to get a picture from people who have done the degrees themselves rather than the uni saying you can do this much.
    As per your previous post I think I will ease myself in as you advise, knowing me I would of just thrown myself in the deep end just to get it done! Good luck with the rest of your degree - better to have a slow year and get the grade than to pressure yourself too much!
 
 
 
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