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    Hi the title basically says it all.

    I'm about to start an MA in English Literature and hope to eventually have a career teaching in further education. I would really love to become a lecturer but I would need a PhD to do this. I've looked into funding and have found that there are scholarships but these are rarer for arts subjects. With this in mind, as the course that I'd like to do would cost about £3000 a year I was wondering if there were any other options?

    Thanks in advance
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    The other problem is that self-funding a PhD does not look as good as being funded when it comes to getting a lectureship. The options for self-funding are saving up and scraping through by any means possible, or doing the PhD part-time and working alongside it; but neither are desirable as they are a huge investment of time and money.
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    (Original post by Baula)
    Hi the title basically says it all.

    I'm about to start an MA in English Literature and hope to eventually have a career teaching in further education. I would really love to become a lecturer but I would need a PhD to do this. I've looked into funding and have found that there are scholarships but these are rarer for arts subjects. With this in mind, as the course that I'd like to do would cost about £3000 a year I was wondering if there were any other options?

    Thanks in advance
    You do not need a doctorate to work in further education. You do not even need a master's degree. Heck, you might not even need a teaching qualification in some cases.

    Assuming you meant higher education, if you do not secure doctorate funding then take that as a sign you are not likely to secure a lectureship too.

    But lots of people self-fund by studying and working part time if you really want to go that route (i.e. cheaper tuition fees over six years).
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    (Original post by Baula)
    Hi the title basically says it all.

    I'm about to start an MA in English Literature and hope to eventually have a career teaching in further education. I would really love to become a lecturer but I would need a PhD to do this. I've looked into funding and have found that there are scholarships but these are rarer for arts subjects. With this in mind, as the course that I'd like to do would cost about £3000 a year I was wondering if there were any other options?

    Thanks in advance
    just out of interest, are you self-funding your MA?
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    (Original post by evantej)
    You do not need a doctorate to work in further education. You do not even need a master's degree. Heck, you might not even need a teaching qualification in some cases.

    Assuming you meant higher education, if you do not secure doctorate funding then take that as a sign you are not likely to secure a lectureship too.

    But lots of people self-fund by studying and working part time if you really want to go that route (i.e. cheaper tuition fees over six years).
    Sorry I didn't explain what I meant clearly I'm interested in teaching young adults/adults basically and have been looking into teaching at colleges etc but, in honesty, my dream job would be to become a lecturer. I wasn't planning to fund it entirely as that would be a huge commitment and, like you said, wouldn't look very good. So far I've found a few generic scholarships and noticed that for science degrees there are a lot of paid ones for research but obviously that would be more awkward for one in English. I guess I was wondering if there are any sites that I should be looking at in particular as I'm not really sure where to begin to be honest?

    (Original post by flywithemma)
    just out of interest, are you self-funding your MA?
    Yes - I've been saving up since first year to cover the tuition fee and I will be studying it part-time over two years so that I can take up extra hours at work to pay towards other expenses
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    (Original post by Baula)
    Sorry I didn't explain what I meant clearly I'm interested in teaching young adults/adults basically and have been looking into teaching at colleges etc but, in honesty, my dream job would be to become a lecturer. I wasn't planning to fund it entirely as that would be a huge commitment and, like you said, wouldn't look very good. So far I've found a few generic scholarships and noticed that for science degrees there are a lot of paid ones for research but obviously that would be more awkward for one in English. I guess I was wondering if there are any sites that I should be looking at in particular as I'm not really sure where to begin to be honest? [...]
    There is next to no funding in the arts and humanities. Your best bet is AHRC funding then individual scholarships. Even top universities have very little funding (i.e. one scholarship per year). Unless you are an exceptional student I would keep higher education as a back-up rather than your first choice just to be realistic.
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    (Original post by evantej)
    There is next to no funding in the arts and humanities. Your best bet is AHRC funding then individual scholarships. Even top universities have very little funding (i.e. one scholarship per year). Unless you are an exceptional student I would keep higher education as a back-up rather than your first choice just to be realistic.
    I thought as much but figured I'd best ask just in case there was something I missed thank you for helping!
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    Here's the number of studentships from AHRC:

    http://www.ahrc.ac.uk/Funding-Opport...dentships.aspx
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    If your main goal is teaching then being a university lecturer may not be as great a job as you think - the most important thing for academics at decent universities is research, and teaching is usually viewed as secondary (and is certainly less important when it comes to hiring/promotions). If you dont think that you would be passionate about research, you will find the PhD unrewarding (and may drop out), and academia unpleasant.

    Have you considered teaching in a further education college? I doubt you need a PhD for that, although given that most humanities PhDs are unable to get academic jobs (there are no jobs in the humanities) I wouldnt be surprised if it was still a competitive field at that leve.
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    (Original post by poohat)
    If your main goal is teaching then being a university lecturer may not be as great a job as you think - the most important thing for academics at decent universities is research, and teaching is usually viewed as secondary (and is certainly less important when it comes to hiring/promotions). If you dont think that you would be passionate about research, you will find the PhD unrewarding (and may drop out), and academia unpleasant.

    Have you considered teaching in a further education college? I doubt you need a PhD for that, although given that most humanities PhDs are unable to get academic jobs (there are no jobs in the humanities) I wouldnt be surprised if it was still a competitive field at that leve.
    I hadn't thought of that. I guess I thought that the research during the PhD would be worth it to be able to teach at that level. I've looked into teaching at colleges but was worried about that option as many say to do the traditional pgce first as further education teaching is a bit iffy atm with the proposed plans for kids to stay in school until 18. I read that I wouldn't be able to work at a sixth form with the teaching qualification needed for that as well. :/

    I know for certain that I want to teach people over 16 and am considering teaching as a second language too. It's just with primary or secondary teaching there's a good chance of a job at the end. I'm just worried of spending all this time and money on further education qualifications and then discovering I can't get a job if that makes sense?

    Sorry for the essay and thank you for your advice! Think a trip to the careers adviser might be in order
 
 
 
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