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    My parents both studied law so I suppose an inclination towards law was inevitable. I was always dead set against doing Law because both my parents seemed to hate their jobs and I was all for studying Psychology in uni (already wrote my first personal statement draft) but then I realised maybe I shouldn't study psychology because i'm rubbish at sciences at maths.

    So is there a strong correlation between the a levels i do (economics, english and history) and law? My mom says there is and that I should study law because I'd probably be good at it since I've always been quite good at writing essays. I went to a law summer camp in Toronto and really enjoyed learning criminal law and learning about criminal defenses. I didn't really enjoy constitutional law or international law as much though.

    I did surprisingly alright for my AS levels (3 As and a B in biology) if it matters at all as to whether or not I should do Law. Also one of the reasons why I didn't really consider Law and went for Psychology was because I didn't expect to do well enough to get into Law.
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    i want to know this too
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    Do you watch Suits?

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    (Original post by StUdEnTIGCSE)
    Do you watch Suits?

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    Yes. Very often actually. Bump!
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    For law you need to be able to express yourself clearly and precisely, analyse complex material carefully, and construct a coherent argument. These are all things that you need to be able to do to write good essays in most subjects (e.g. history, philosophy, literature slightly less so in my opinion). So if you're good at essays because you're good at doing those things, chances are you'll be good at law. If you're good at essays for other reasons - literary creativity and imagination, for example, which can be of great benefit in writing about art and literature - then there will be less carryover. (But of course you might be good at all those things!)

    As an aside, and even though I'm sure it's obvious - don't do law because your parents think you should do! It may well be that you'd be good at law, but you'd probably be good at lots of other things too. So make the decision based on what appeals to you most. (Although I agree that if you genuinely are rubbish at science and maths then psychology is not a great choice!)
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    (Original post by Estreth)
    For law you need to be able to express yourself clearly and precisely, analyse complex material carefully, and construct a coherent argument. These are all things that you need to be able to do to write good essays in most subjects (e.g. history, philosophy, literature slightly less so in my opinion). So if you're good at essays because you're good at doing those things, chances are you'll be good at law. If you're good at essays for other reasons - literary creativity and imagination, for example, which can be of great benefit in writing about art and literature - then there will be less carryover. (But of course you might be good at all those things!)

    As an aside, and even though I'm sure it's obvious - don't do law because your parents think you should do! It may well be that you'd be good at law, but you'd probably be good at lots of other things too. So make the decision based on what appeals to you most. (Although I agree that if you genuinely are rubbish at science and maths then psychology is not a great choice!)
    I'm not sure because I was very interested in Psychology but I guess my skill set doesn't match up to what the course requires. Maths and science constantly gets in my way ugh. I don't even know what other courses might possibly interest me to be honest but I really did enjoy some bits of the law camp I went to.
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    From what I've done so far - first year of law - english doesn't prepare you as well for the writing style. Whilst English is flowerly, Law is not. Depending on how you are taught History it can be good practice. E.g. We were taught to include less description, more fact and then analysis of each point. Law is very similar in that sense.

    But ultimately if you don't want to study Law then you won't enjoy it! Criminal Law is interesting to most people but the other elements - Contact and Constitutional Law - are often dry if you aren't engaged. Don't let your parents push you into deciding.
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    (Original post by Estreth)
    For law you need to be able to express yourself clearly and precisely, analyse complex material carefully, and construct a coherent argument. These are all things that you need to be able to do to write good essays in most subjects (e.g. history, philosophy, literature slightly less so in my opinion). So if you're good at essays because you're good at doing those things, chances are you'll be good at law. If you're good at essays for other reasons - literary creativity and imagination, for example, which can be of great benefit in writing about art and literature - then there will be less carryover. (But of course you might be good at all those things!)

    As an aside, and even though I'm sure it's obvious - don't do law because your parents think you should do! It may well be that you'd be good at law, but you'd probably be good at lots of other things too. So make the decision based on what appeals to you most. (Although I agree that if you genuinely are rubbish at science and maths then psychology is not a great choice!)
    ^completely agree.

    It is very likely that you will be good at law, but you have to like it too!

    Have you thought about doing a different undergrad degree and then doing law afterwards (as a law conversion, the GDL)?




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