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    I have to pick my a levels in november and have no idea which to choose, what is english language a level like? Is it hard? easy? coursework or exam? thanks
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    It's a lot different from GCSE because all your basically learn is new terminology and their definitions and how they are used in the texts you will be analysing and writing about. You'd never believe how many different types of verbs/adjectives there are! This part of A-level English Language is called linguistics!

    On the other hand you will learn something that's called Children's Language Acquisition or Children's Reading and Writing which you will learn how children learn to speak from their "oo" and their coos, from their grammatical structures of their talking. Reading and Writing you will learn how children read and how they progress from 'scribbles' to transformational writing.

    This is mainly for the exams.

    Coursework will require you to write about a representation in language. For exam how does technology influence the way language is used or how something for example footballers represented in tabloids through language. This is where you find sources and analyze them by comparing their linguistic features in their differences and similarities.

    I do both English A-levels (separately) and I found Language harder as I don't enjoy quite as much as I enjoy Lit. But ironically I received higher marks in Language than Lit. Personally I think it's due to the Lit exams being harder than Language.

    Oh and Language, there's a lot of theories!! You'll study theories in if not all most A-levels you do! And there's loads of theories for your children's section and a lot for the language/mode section such as Face Theory, Co-operative Approach and then you've got Skinner, Jean Aitchinson and people on the Child Language stuff.

    It's hard work but that's what A-levels are!
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    Thanks, it sounds interesting, would you say its relatively easy to get a good grade compared to some other a levels?
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    (Original post by Chloe106)
    Thanks, it sounds interesting, would you say its relatively easy to get a good grade compared to some other a levels?
    Sorry, I rushed my answer the other day -- I am not incompetent, I'm just lazy to re-read what I put.

    Erm, well I did English Language, English Literature, History and Philosophy & Ethics and General Studies (compulsory).

    Well, because both my English A-levels were 40% coursework, it really helped with my overall grades compared to my 100% A-levels. I secured high B (2 marks of an A) in my Language coursework and a mid B in my Lit coursework. The grade you get for your coursework depends on how engagement you put in. If you miss deadlines you won't get extra chances to improve your coursework and this will affect your overall grade if you don't do so well in your exam.

    English exams vary so much. Language exams are easier because you know what you have to revise. You have to revise for EVERYTHING. This years AQA A Language was alright for Section A. Section B however, was quite shaky for me. It asked something like "Explain how Grammar is developed and used in Children's Language Development." I didn't revised Grammar that much. I revised everything else for it but only about 10% of Grammar. But I manage to get a B (2 marks of an A for the whole paper). So for Language, make sure you revise everything to secure a top grade.

    Literature however is different. There's no real way to revise for Literature for me. I did AQA A WW1 Lit. How I revised for the exam was that I memorized 24 quotes for different themes which is what we had to do. And the Poetry Section, in class we just analyzed crazy-loads of poetry (40 hours worth of analyzing poetry). The only advice I could give (depending on what exam board you're with) is to know your set text and practise, practise, practise and MORE practise essay skills for your exam. I thought I was alright for my essay skills so I didn't practice. But, when it came to the Poetry section I was stuck for 15 mins because I didn't know how to structure it, and I didn't finish on time so my overall grade suffered (not badly, but I could have done better).

    Comparing to English and other A-levels are different. Some A-levels require you to strictly go through a structured essay plan like History because that's what you get marked for alongside what you right which makes History really hard! Some other A-levels you can get away with just writing all the right information without a fool-proof essay plan.

    If you want to know more, ask away!
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    I've just completed my English language AS, and like Cool_Jord, I do both lit and lang separately. Let me tell you now that they are completely different, and cannot be approached in the same way, which is what I tried to do. I received a B in language, but an A in literature, so as you may be able to tell, I'm more inclined towards the literature side of things. It can be a lot of fun, especially if your class is small, but it is certainly not any easier than other courses. Good luck!
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    (Original post by Cool_JordH)
    Sorry, I rushed my answer the other day -- I am not incompetent, I'm just lazy to re-read what I put.

    Erm, well I did English Language, English Literature, History and Philosophy & Ethics and General Studies (compulsory).

    Well, because both my English A-levels were 40% coursework, it really helped with my overall grades compared to my 100% A-levels. I secured high B (2 marks of an A) in my Language coursework and a mid B in my Lit coursework. The grade you get for your coursework depends on how engagement you put in. If you miss deadlines you won't get extra chances to improve your coursework and this will affect your overall grade if you don't do so well in your exam.

    English exams vary so much. Language exams are easier because you know what you have to revise. You have to revise for EVERYTHING. This years AQA A Language was alright for Section A. Section B however, was quite shaky for me. It asked something like "Explain how Grammar is developed and used in Children's Language Development." I didn't revised Grammar that much. I revised everything else for it but only about 10% of Grammar. But I manage to get a B (2 marks of an A for the whole paper). So for Language, make sure you revise everything to secure a top grade.

    Literature however is different. There's no real way to revise for Literature for me. I did AQA A WW1 Lit. How I revised for the exam was that I memorized 24 quotes for different themes which is what we had to do. And the Poetry Section, in class we just analyzed crazy-loads of poetry (40 hours worth of analyzing poetry). The only advice I could give (depending on what exam board you're with) is to know your set text and practise, practise, practise and MORE practise essay skills for your exam. I thought I was alright for my essay skills so I didn't practice. But, when it came to the Poetry section I was stuck for 15 mins because I didn't know how to structure it, and I didn't finish on time so my overall grade suffered (not badly, but I could have done better).

    Comparing to English and other A-levels are different. Some A-levels require you to strictly go through a structured essay plan like History because that's what you get marked for alongside what you right which makes History really hard! Some other A-levels you can get away with just writing all the right information without a fool-proof essay plan.

    If you want to know more, ask away!
    Thanks, I think I'll go with english language. What did you have to do for your coursework? Also, do have any tips on how to write/plan a really good essay? Congratulations on your grades
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    (Original post by Chloe106)
    Thanks, I think I'll go with english language. What did you have to do for your coursework? Also, do have any tips on how to write/plan a really good essay? Congratulations on your grades
    Why English Lang? Sounds easier, but there's a lot more to learn like different frameworks and theories! And erm we did two. One was Representation and I did a representation on how technology had influenced language. The production one, you had to choose a topic and represent it in a certain way. I did something like 'Take A Break' magazine and did a creative piece of a life story of a woman who got domestically abused and it was called 'A Woman of No Importance' but irony was she was telling her story because she wants to be a woman of importance. I had to do the layout and stuff. Then comment on all the linguistic stuff I chose to do. Like why I decided to name it, the clauses I used different types of adjectives and how this reflected the message and reader, etc.

    And thank you!
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    I've just finished my AS language course this year and I really enjoy it, you can read a range of texts where as in Lit it's all just books/poetry and that appealed to me more. Once you learn the theories it is straightforward and you need to gain a good grasp of grammar (we did a refresher unit because we all only had basic knowledge!) but the coursework in particular is enjoyable if you like creative writing and once you get into study of dialect and such it's interesting.
 
 
 
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